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Title: The Effect of Cumulative Job Mobility on Early-career Wage Development: Does Job Mobility Actually Pay?
Resulting in 1 citation.
1. Yankow, Jeffrey Jon
The Effect of Cumulative Job Mobility on Early-career Wage Development: Does Job Mobility Actually Pay?
Social Science Quarterly published online (5 May 2022): DOI: 10.1111/ssqu.13161.
Also: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/ssqu.13161
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Wiley Online
Keyword(s): Job Tenure; Mobility, Job; Wage Models; Wages

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Objective: This study attempts to answer the question of whether cumulative job mobility in the early career actually pays.

Methods: Using a sample of men and women drawn from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997, a series of wage models are estimated that account for both the timing and frequency of job changes over the first decade of the working career as well as for complex interactions between job mobility, actual work experience, and job tenure.

Results: The wage estimates indicate that workers who demonstrate moderate job-changing in the first 2 years after labor market entry but then taper their mobility thereafter actually raise their log-wage path above that of either immobile workers or persistent job changers.

Bibliography Citation
Yankow, Jeffrey Jon. "The Effect of Cumulative Job Mobility on Early-career Wage Development: Does Job Mobility Actually Pay?" Social Science Quarterly published online (5 May 2022): DOI: 10.1111/ssqu.13161.