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Source: Department of Economics, University of California, San Diego
Resulting in 3 citations.
1. Betts, Julian R.
Does School Quality Matter? Evidence from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth
Working Paper No. 93-10, Department of Economics, University of California - San Diego, March 1993
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Department of Economics, University of California, San Diego
Keyword(s): Benefits, Fringe; Human Capital; School Quality; Wage Differentials; Wage Effects; Wage Levels

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The working paper investigates links between school quality and subsequent earnings of students. It uses data for white males from the NLSY and rejects the hypothesis that workers' earnings are independent of which high school they attended. Nevertheless, the traditional measures of school "quality" such as class size, teachers' salaries and teachers' level of education fail to capture these differences. This result is robust to changes in specification and subsample. This paper contrasts the results with those of Card and Krueger (1992), and speculates that structural changes may have weakened the bond between conventional measures of school quality and student outcomes.
Bibliography Citation
Betts, Julian R. "Does School Quality Matter? Evidence from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth." Working Paper No. 93-10, Department of Economics, University of California - San Diego, March 1993.
2. Betts, Julian R.
The Impact of School Resources on Women's Earnings and Educational Attainment: Findings from the National Longitudinal Survey of Young Women
Working Paper 96/24R, Department of Economics, University of California - San Diego, 1996. Also:http://www.econ.ucsd.edu/~jbetts/pap14.htm
Cohort(s): Young Women
Publisher: Department of Economics, University of California, San Diego
Keyword(s): Earnings; Human Capital; Job Tenure; Occupational Choice; Racial Differences; Schooling; Training, Occupational; Wage Differentials; Wage Levels

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The paper measures the impact of high school resources on women's educational attainment and earnings. No link emerges between education and school resources--as measured by the pupil-teacher ratio, spending per pupil, teachers' starting salaries or books per student. For white women, no significant connection between school resources and wages is found. But school inputs are in several cases significantly and positively related to black women's wages. Wage elasticities with respect to school inputs are uniformly larger for black women. Finally, the impact of school resources on earnings remains constant or in some cases weakens as workers grow older. Copyright: This record is part of the Abstracts of Working Papers in Economics (AWPE) Database, copyright (c) 2001 Cambridge University Press
Bibliography Citation
Betts, Julian R. "The Impact of School Resources on Women's Earnings and Educational Attainment: Findings from the National Longitudinal Survey of Young Women." Working Paper 96/24R, Department of Economics, University of California - San Diego, 1996. Also:http://www.econ.ucsd.edu/~jbetts/pap14.htm.
3. Wallace, Leslie Renee
The Emergent Contingent Workforce
Ph.D. Dissertation, Department of Economics, University of California, San Diego, 2008.
Also: https://escholarship.org/uc/item/9t09s2hx
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Department of Economics, University of California, San Diego
Keyword(s): Employment, Intermittent; Family Circumstances, Changes in; Family Income; Family Resources; Labor Force Participation; Work, Contingent

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This dissertation focuses on the labor supply decisions of temporary workers in order to determine who these workers are, the welfare of these workers and if their choice of employment is a result of their preferences or of labor market constraints.

In the Chapter 4 I use the NLSY79 to examine from the change from regular to contingent employment and vice versa, on family earnings. Since contingent employment is an increasingly common means of securing employment, it is important to understand whether the change in job status stated above adversely affects the economic outcome of the family unit. Results show that family earnings are adversely affected by the change in work status from regular to contingent employment although the spouse mitigates this through compensatory spousal contributions.

Bibliography Citation
Wallace, Leslie Renee. The Emergent Contingent Workforce. Ph.D. Dissertation, Department of Economics, University of California, San Diego, 2008..