Search Results

Source: Education Finance and Policy
Resulting in 3 citations.
1. Grissom, Jason
Reininger, Michelle
Who Comes Back? A Longitudinal Analysis of the Re-entry Behavior of Exiting Teachers
Education Finance and Policy 7,4 (2012): 425-454.
Also: http://cepa.stanford.edu/content/who-comes-back-longitudinal-analysis-re-entry-behavior-exiting-teachershttp://cepa.stanford.edu/content/who-comes-back-longitudinal-analysis-re-entry-behavior-exiting-teachers
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Center for Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University
Keyword(s): Exits; Gender Differences; Labor Supply; Modeling, Hazard/Event History/Survival/Duration; Motherhood; Teachers/Faculty; Work Reentry

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

While a large literature examines the factors that lead teachers to leave teaching, few studies have systematically examined what factors impact teachers’ decisions to re-enter the profession after exiting. Drawing on research on the role of family characteristics in predicting teacher work behavior, we examine predictors of re-entry after a spell out. We employ survival analysis of time to re-entry for teachers who exit using longitudinal work data from the 1979 cohort of the National Longitudinal Surveys of Youth. We find that teachers who are younger, better paid and more experienced are more likely to re-enter. We also find that women are more likely to return to teaching than men. Child-rearing plays an important role in this difference. In particular, women are less likely to re-enter with young children in the home. We conclude that re-entrants may be an important source of teacher labor supply and that policies focused on the needs of teachers with young children may be effective means for districts to attract returning teachers.
Bibliography Citation
Grissom, Jason and Michelle Reininger. "Who Comes Back? A Longitudinal Analysis of the Re-entry Behavior of Exiting Teachers." Education Finance and Policy 7,4 (2012): 425-454.
2. Johnson, William R.
Are Public Subsidies to Higher Education Regressive?
Education Finance and Policy 1,3 (Summer 2006): 288-315.
Also: http://www.mitpressjournals.org/doi/pdf/10.1162/edfp.2006.1.3.288
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: MIT Press
Keyword(s): Higher Education; Household Income; Income Distribution; Income Level; Life Cycle Research; Taxes; Tuition

This article estimates the dollar amount of public higher education subsidies received by U.S. youth and examines the distribution of subsidies and the taxes that finance them across parental and student income levels. Although youths from high-income families obtain more benefit from higher education subsidies, high income households pay sufficiently more in taxes that the net effect of the spending and associated taxation is distributionally neutral or mildly progressive. These results are robust to alternative assumptions and are consistent with Hansen and Weisbrod's earlier celebrated findings for California, although not with the conclusions often drawn from those findings.
Bibliography Citation
Johnson, William R. "Are Public Subsidies to Higher Education Regressive?" Education Finance and Policy 1,3 (Summer 2006): 288-315.
3. Kreisman, Daniel M.
Stange, Kevin
Vocational and Career Tech Education in American High Schools: The Value of Depth Over Breadth
Education Finance and Policy published online (5 June 2018): DOI: 10.1162/edfp_a_00266.
Also: https://www.mitpressjournals.org/doi/abs/10.1162/edfp_a_00266
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: MIT Press
Keyword(s): Earnings; High School Curriculum; High School Transcripts; Vocational Education

Vocational education is a large part of the high school curriculum, yet we have little understanding of what drives vocational enrollment or whether these courses help or harm early careers. To address this we develop a framework for curriculum choice, taking into account ability and preferences for academic and vocational work. We test model predictions using detailed transcript and earnings information from the NLSY97. Our results are two-fold. First, students positively sort into vocational courses, suggesting the belief that low ability students are funneled into vocational coursework is unlikely true. Second, we find higher earnings among students taking more upper-level vocational courses -- a nearly 2% wage premium for each additional year, yet we find no gain from introductory vocational courses. These results suggest (a) policies limiting students' ability to take vocational courses may not be welfare enhancing, and (b) the benefits of vocational coursework accrue to those who focus on depth over breadth.
Bibliography Citation
Kreisman, Daniel M. and Kevin Stange. "Vocational and Career Tech Education in American High Schools: The Value of Depth Over Breadth." Education Finance and Policy published online (5 June 2018): DOI: 10.1162/edfp_a_00266.