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Source: Growth and Change
Resulting in 3 citations.
1. Knapp, Thomas A.
White, Nancy E.
Wolaver, Amy M.
The Returns to Migration: The Influence of Education and Migration Type
Growth and Change 44,4 (December 2013): 589-607.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/grow.12022/abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Wiley Online
Keyword(s): Educational Attainment; Migration; Wage Growth

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

We show the impact of migration type on real wages over time. We create a migration and earnings history from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth over the period 1979–2002. We estimate the effects of primary, onward, and two types of return migration on real wages using a panel data model with individual, location, and time fixed effects. Panel data are well suited for the study of the returns to U.S. internal migration because the influence of migration on wages has been found to occur years after the event. We differentiate return migration into two types: return to a location with ties that form a geographical anchor (“home”) and return to a prior place of work. We find that real wage growth varies by migration type. Education attainment is a significant factor in real wage growth. Our results show that onward migration is an important channel by which the monetary rewards to a college education are manifested.
Bibliography Citation
Knapp, Thomas A., Nancy E. White and Amy M. Wolaver. "The Returns to Migration: The Influence of Education and Migration Type." Growth and Change 44,4 (December 2013): 589-607.
2. Mangum, Stephen L.
Adams, Arvil Van
Labor Market Impacts of Post-school Occupational Training for Young Men
Growth and Change 18,4 (Fall 1987): 57-73
Cohort(s): Young Men
Publisher: College of Business and Economics, University of Kentucky
Keyword(s): Educational Attainment; Educational Returns; Job Training; Racial Differences; Schooling, Post-secondary; Training, Occupational; Training, Post-School

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The period 1966 to 1976 was a decade of change, contrast, and challenge. In this article, a model contrasting the labor market experience of young men who participated in post-school occupational training during this period with those young men who did not participate is developed and then estimated using data from the NLS of Young Men. Participation in post-school forms of occupational training is identified as a significant contributor to individual labor market success during the period and racial differences in returns to training are highlighted. The results prompt questions concerning the direction of current federal training policies for the disadvantaged.
Bibliography Citation
Mangum, Stephen L. and Arvil Van Adams. "Labor Market Impacts of Post-school Occupational Training for Young Men." Growth and Change 18,4 (Fall 1987): 57-73.
3. Wolaver, Amy M.
White, Nancy E.
Racial Wage Differences among Young Male Job Changers: The Relative Contribution of Migration, Occupation Change, Site Characteristics, and Human Capital
Growth and Change 37,1 (March 2006): 34-59.
Also: http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/doi/abs/10.1111/j.1468-2257.2006.00303.x
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: College of Business and Economics, University of Kentucky
Keyword(s): Black Youth; Employment; Human Capital; Male Sample; Migration; Racial Differences; Wage Gap

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

We demonstrated racial differences in the relationship between migration, location, and predicted wages for young male workers who have changed employers. An Oaxaca decomposition allowed a measuring of the contributions of migration, occupation change, site features, and human capital to the racial wage gap. Migration decreases black-white wage differences, and wage compensation for site attributes favors white householders. Constraints on occupation choice and migration dampen the ability of blacks to improve wages. Because most job changes occur in the first ten years of a career, these results on young workers give important general insights into the origins and persistence of racial wage gaps.
Bibliography Citation
Wolaver, Amy M. and Nancy E. White. "Racial Wage Differences among Young Male Job Changers: The Relative Contribution of Migration, Occupation Change, Site Characteristics, and Human Capital." Growth and Change 37,1 (March 2006): 34-59.