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Source: Journal of Black Studies
Resulting in 3 citations.
1. Braddock, Jomills H.
McPartland, James M.
Social Psychological Processes that Perpetuate Racial Segregation: The Relationship Between School and Employment Segregation
Journal of Black Studies 19,3 (March 1989): 267-289.
Also: http://jbs.sagepub.com/content/19/3/267.full.pdf+html
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Discrimination, Racial/Ethnic; Employment; Geographical Variation; High School; Life Cycle Research; Occupational Segregation; Occupations; Racial Differences; Schooling

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Interview data from the black subsample (N=472 females and 602 males) of the NLSY are used to investigate the effects of school desegregation on subsequent employment desegregation. Findings show that in the North, net of individual differences in sex, age, occupational status, and local demographic conditions, blacks from desegregated schools are more likely to be employed in desegregated occupational work groups. Moreover, in racially mixed employment settings, blacks from desegregated school backgrounds make fewer racial distinctions about the friendliness of their coworkers or about the competence of their employment supervisors. In contrast, blacks from segregated schools perceived desegregated coworker groups to be slightly less friendly and white supervisors to be significantly less competent. The results are discussed in terms of theories of intervening social-psychological processes that link desegregation across different institutional settings and stages of the life cycle. [Sociological Abstracts, Inc.]
Bibliography Citation
Braddock, Jomills H. and James M. McPartland. "Social Psychological Processes that Perpetuate Racial Segregation: The Relationship Between School and Employment Segregation." Journal of Black Studies 19,3 (March 1989): 267-289.
2. Mizell, C. André
Life Course Influences on African American Men's Depression: Adolescent Parental Composition, Self-Concept, and Adult Earnings
Journal of Black Studies 29,4 (March 1999): 467-490.
Also: http://jbs.sagepub.com/content/29/4/467.full.pdf+html
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Black Studies; Family Structure; Health, Mental; Life Course; Locus of Control (see Rotter Scale); Pearlin Mastery Scale; Self-Esteem; Socioeconomic Status (SES)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Examined how family structure, parental achievement, adolescent self-esteem, adult socioeconomic attainment, and adult self-concept contribute to adult depression in African American males. Data were used from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (1979-1992). At the time of the initial interview, the age range was 14-18 yrs. Data obtained from 892 African American and 1,454 White males were used in a series of cumulative regression equations to explain the effects of adolescent and adult factors on adult depression and in a comparative analysis comparing the outcomes of Blacks to Whites. Results show that a female-headed household did not produce significantly higher levels of depression in Black males. Parental education was a significant negative predictor of depression; however, African American males with higher earnings and higher mastery were less at risk for depression. Having the status of "White male" was a protective factor against depression. An appendix of the items comprising depression, self-esteem, and mastery is provided. ((c) 1999 APA/PsycINFO, all rights reserved.)
Bibliography Citation
Mizell, C. André. "Life Course Influences on African American Men's Depression: Adolescent Parental Composition, Self-Concept, and Adult Earnings." Journal of Black Studies 29,4 (March 1999): 467-490.
3. Parks-Yancy, Rochelle
The Effects of Social Group Membership and Social Capital Resources on Careers
Journal of Black Studies 36,4 (March 2006): 515-545.
Also: http://jbs.sagepub.com/content/36/4/515.abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Earnings; Employment; Gender Differences; Minorities; Racial Differences

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Using a nationally representative sample, this study looks at the effects of race, gender, and social capital resources on two career measures: (a) earnings and (b) promotions. The author finds that blacks suffer a social capital deficit relative to whites and that men and whites' career advantages accumulate over time, whereas blacks' disadvantages accumulate, as well. Thus, race, gender, and social capital resources contribute to unequal career trajectories, and these results generalize to the U.S. population.
Bibliography Citation
Parks-Yancy, Rochelle. "The Effects of Social Group Membership and Social Capital Resources on Careers." Journal of Black Studies 36,4 (March 2006): 515-545.