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Source: Journal of Divorce and Remarriage
Resulting in 4 citations.
1. Christie-Mizell, C. André
Racial Variation in the Effects of Sons versus Daughters on the Disruption of the First Marriage
Journal of Divorce and Remarriage 38,3-4 (2003): 41-60.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1300/J087v38n03_03
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Haworth Press, Inc.
Keyword(s): Divorce; Gender Differences; Marital Disruption; Marriage; Preschool Children; Racial Differences; Siblings; Socioeconomic Status (SES)

This research investigates whether there is racial variation in how the gender composition of the sibling group impacts the probability of divorce among couples in their first marriage. For African American families, the effect of children's sex is mediated by socioeconomic status. However, with regard to Whites, the number of sons heightens the probability of divorce, while daughters have no effect on the marital union. Other sibling group characteristics are pivotal to predicting the likelihood of divorce regardless of race. The presence of preschool children in the home is negatively related to divorce, and the age range of the sibling group is inversely associated with marital disruption. (PsycINFO Database Record 2003 APA, all rights reserved)
Bibliography Citation
Christie-Mizell, C. André. "Racial Variation in the Effects of Sons versus Daughters on the Disruption of the First Marriage." Journal of Divorce and Remarriage 38,3-4 (2003): 41-60.
2. Mauldin, Teresa A.
Economic Consequences of Divorce or Separation among Women in Poverty
Journal of Divorce and Remarriage 14,3-4 (1991): 163-177.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1300/J087v14n03_10
Cohort(s): Young Women
Publisher: Haworth Press, Inc.
Keyword(s): Children; Divorce; Educational Attainment; Income; Job Status; Job Training; Marital Disruption; Marital Dissolution; Poverty

Data from a subsample (N = 101) of the NLS Young Women cohort are used to investigate the characteristics of low-income women following divorce or separation, highlighting factors that help explain a woman's ability to move out of poverty in the year following marital disruption/dissolution. Discriminant analysis results indicate that the most important discriminators of this ability are current employment status, job training, education, race, and presence of a child under age 6. [Sociological Abstracts, Inc.]
Bibliography Citation
Mauldin, Teresa A. "Economic Consequences of Divorce or Separation among Women in Poverty." Journal of Divorce and Remarriage 14,3-4 (1991): 163-177.
3. Willetts, Marion C.
Maroules, Nick G.
Does Remarriage Matter? The Well-Being of Adolescents Living with Cohabiting versus Remarried Mothers
Journal of Divorce and Remarriage 41,3/4 (2004): 115-134.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1300/J087v41n03_06
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Haworth Press, Inc.
Keyword(s): Adolescent Behavior; Behavioral Problems; Cohabitation; Delinquency/Gang Activity; Family Structure; Parental Influences; Parenting Skills/Styles; Remarriage; Substance Use; Well-Being

We analyze data from the 1997 wave of the National Longitudinal Surveys of Youth (NLSY) to compare well-being (delinquency, substance abuse, and behavioral/emotional problems) among 12 to 17-year-old adolescents living with a cohabiting mother and her partner versus a remarried mother and her spouse. The results indicate that maternal remarriage does not provide benefits over maternal cohabitation with regard to adolescent well-being, as no differences were found between adolescents residing in cohabiting and married stepparent families. Instead, stresses, parental involvement, and parenting style (of both the biological parent and the stepparent) predict well-being, and these factors are not experienced differentially by adolescents of cohabiting and married step-families. We discuss the implications of our results for public policy. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
Bibliography Citation
Willetts, Marion C. and Nick G. Maroules. "Does Remarriage Matter? The Well-Being of Adolescents Living with Cohabiting versus Remarried Mothers." Journal of Divorce and Remarriage 41,3/4 (2004): 115-134.
4. Woods, Lakeesha N.
Emery, Robert E.
The Cohabitation Effect on Divorce: Causation or Selection?
Journal of Divorce and Remarriage 37,3/4 (April 22, 2003): 101-122.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1300/J087v37n03_06
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Haworth Press, Inc.
Keyword(s): Cohabitation; Delinquency/Gang Activity; Divorce; Ethnic Groups/Ethnicity; Religious Influences

The rate of cohabitation in the United States continues to increase. Some research suggests that cohabitation leads to, or causes, relationship instability, as it is well established that people who cohabit prior to marriage are more likely to divorce. Alternative research implicates selection rather than causal effects of cohabitation because background characteristics of cohabitors explain much of the relationship between cohabitation and divorce. The current prospective study tests the selection hypothesis using data from the 1979-1998 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY). Cohabitation accounted for little variance in divorce rates after controlling for the cultural factors of ethnicity and religion and the personal attribute of delinquency. The impact of delinquency, ethnicity, and religiosity are discussed in the context of acquiring a greater understanding of risk factors of divorce.
Bibliography Citation
Woods, Lakeesha N. and Robert E. Emery. "The Cohabitation Effect on Divorce: Causation or Selection?" Journal of Divorce and Remarriage 37,3/4 (April 22, 2003): 101-122.