Search Results

Source: Journal of Regional Science
Resulting in 7 citations.
1. Cooper, Joyce M. Richard
Migration and Market Wage Risk
Journal of Regional Science 34,4 (November 1994): 563-582.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1467-9787.1994.tb00883.x/abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Blackwell Publishing, Inc. => Wiley Online
Keyword(s): Human Capital; Migration; Modeling, Probit; Wage Dynamics

This paper departs from the human capital tradition in the migration literature by formalizing the market- specific information contained in wages along the lines suggested by Phelp's (1969) 'island parable' of search. It allows us to incorporate the role of market wage variability as a source of information in individual migration decisions. A linear approximation to the expected utility comparison that migrants make is used to formulate a probit specification of the move or stay decision conditional on origin market and individual characteristics. The focus here is on quantifying the effects of the origin market acting through amenities and the share of market-specific wage variability as it affects forecasts of alternative wages and forecast precision. A subsample of employed males, not in school or in the military, from the US National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLS) ages 16 to 22 yr. is used for estimation. The empirical results are consistent with the theoretically predicted relationship between migration propensities and regional differences in the information content of wages.
Bibliography Citation
Cooper, Joyce M. Richard. "Migration and Market Wage Risk." Journal of Regional Science 34,4 (November 1994): 563-582.
2. Finney, Miles M.
Kohlhase, Janet E.
The Effect of Urbanization on Labor Turnover
Journal of Regional Science 48,2 (May 2008): 311-328.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1467-9787.2008.00553.x/abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Blackwell Publishing, Inc. => Wiley Online
Keyword(s): Endogeneity; Labor Market Demographics; Urbanization/Urban Living

The paper empirically examines labor market matching as a source of urban agglomeration economies. We work from the hypothesis that job turnover leads to tighter labor matches and estimate the relationship between urbanization and the job mobility of young men. Using a panel from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, we find evidence that young men change jobs more frequently in their early career if they live in larger or in more educated urban areas. The sensitivity of the results to whether the young men were "movers" or "stayers" suggests the possible endogeneity of location. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]

Copyright of Journal of Regional Science is the property of Blackwell Publishing Limited and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts)

Bibliography Citation
Finney, Miles M. and Janet E. Kohlhase. "The Effect of Urbanization on Labor Turnover." Journal of Regional Science 48,2 (May 2008): 311-328.
3. Guettabi, Mouhcine
Munasib, Abdul
Urban Sprawl, Obesogenic Environment, and Child Weight
Journal of Regional Science 54,3 (June 2014): 378-401.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/jors.12123/abstract
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Blackwell Publishing, Inc. => Wiley Online
Keyword(s): Body Mass Index (BMI); Child Health; Environment, Pollution/Urban Density; Exercise; Gender Differences; Geocoded Data; Maternal Employment; Mobility, Residential; Obesity; Physical Activity (see also Exercise); Residence; Weight

Using the 1979 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth along with the child survey, we examine the relationship between urban sprawl of U.S. metro counties and the body mass index (BMI) of children who reside in these counties. We make a distinction between urban sprawl in a county and its geographical placement in the urban hierarchy. Even after accounting for unobserved individual heterogeneity and resulting selection bias, we find that urban sprawl is positively related to child BMI and distance to large metros is negatively related to child BMI. These effects are somewhat pronounced among girls and middle/high school children.
Bibliography Citation
Guettabi, Mouhcine and Abdul Munasib. "Urban Sprawl, Obesogenic Environment, and Child Weight." Journal of Regional Science 54,3 (June 2014): 378-401.
4. Haurin, Donald R.
Haurin, R. Jean
Net Migration, Unemployment, and the Business Cycle
Journal of Regional Science 28,2 (May 1988): 239-253.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1467-9787.1988.tb01211.x/abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Blackwell Publishing, Inc. => Wiley Online
Keyword(s): Business Cycles; Endogeneity; Job Turnover; Local Labor Market; Migration; Mobility, Job; Unemployment Rate

An empirical test of the effects of exogenous shocks upon a region's population size is conducted in the framework of an equilibrium locational model. The model emphasizes the separation of endogenous from exogenous factors, a point omitted in most empirical studies of aggregate migration. Exogenous changes are manifested in the local relative cost of living and the local relative unemployment rate. Hypotheses are supported in analyses of data from both the NLSY as well as Census. Surprisingly, a simple measure of the size of a shock to a regional economy has the greatest explanatory power compared with more sophisticated measures based on prior business cycles.
Bibliography Citation
Haurin, Donald R. and R. Jean Haurin. "Net Migration, Unemployment, and the Business Cycle." Journal of Regional Science 28,2 (May 1988): 239-253.
5. Knapp, Thomas A.
White, Nancy E.
The Effect of Youth Poverty Rates and Migration on Adult Wages
Journal of Regional Science 56,2 (March 2016): 239-256.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/jors.12241/abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Blackwell Publishing, Inc. => Wiley Online
Keyword(s): Earnings; Geocoded Data; Human Capital; Male Sample; Migration; Poverty; Rural/Urban Differences

We created a migration and earnings history from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth to analyze the effects of youth county poverty rates on the adult earnings of white male migrants. We estimate a log wage equation that includes human capital measures, migration types, county poverty rates, and a rural-poverty rate interaction variable. Growing up in a rural county has a negative impact on adult wages independent of youth county poverty rates, but the rural effect is significantly greater for those who grew up in high poverty counties. Youth county poverty rates indirectly affect wages through the returns to migration.
Bibliography Citation
Knapp, Thomas A. and Nancy E. White. "The Effect of Youth Poverty Rates and Migration on Adult Wages." Journal of Regional Science 56,2 (March 2016): 239-256.
6. Plantinga, Andrew J.
Bernell, Stephanie
The Association Between Urban Sprawl And Obesity: Is It A Two-Way Street?
Journal of Regional Science 47,5 (December 2007): 857-879.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1467-9787.2007.00533.x/abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Blackwell Publishing, Inc. => Wiley Online
Keyword(s): Body Mass Index (BMI); Data Linkage (also see Record Linkage); Demography; Geocoded Data; Geographical Variation; Marital Status; Modeling, Instrumental Variables; Neighborhood Effects; Obesity; Urban and Regional Planning; Urbanization/Urban Living; Weight

Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=1017961 or DOI: 10.1111/j.1467-9787.2007.00533.x

We empirically examine the relationship between obesity and urban development patterns where individuals reside. Previous analyses treat urban form as exogenous to weight, and find higher body mass indices (BMI) among residents of areas with sprawl patterns of development. Using samples of recent movers, we find that the causality runs in both directions. Individuals who move to denser locations lose weight. As well, BMI is a determinant of the choice of a dense or sprawling location. In sum, while moving to a dense area results in weight loss, such locations are unlikely to be selected by individuals with high BMI.

Bibliography Citation
Plantinga, Andrew J. and Stephanie Bernell. "The Association Between Urban Sprawl And Obesity: Is It A Two-Way Street?" Journal of Regional Science 47,5 (December 2007): 857-879.
7. Yankow, Jeffrey Jon
Migration, Job Change, and Wage Growth: A New Perspective on the Pecuniary Return to Geographic Mobility
Journal of Regional Science 43,3 (August 2003): 483-517.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/1467-9787.00308/abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Blackwell Publishing, Inc. => Wiley Online
Keyword(s): Educational Attainment; Educational Returns; Male Sample; Migration; Mobility, Job; School Completion; Wage Dynamics

Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979, this study examines the pattern of early career job mobility and migration in a sample of young male workers. Primary interest lies in the between-job wage change accompanying job transitions as well as the extended time-profile of migrant earnings. When the sample of job transitions is partitioned by education level, contemporaneous returns are found only for workers with twelve or less years of completed schooling. In contrast, highly educated workers demonstrate significant extended returns to migration with the bulk of pecuniary rewards accruing with a lag of nearly two years. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
Bibliography Citation
Yankow, Jeffrey Jon. "Migration, Job Change, and Wage Growth: A New Perspective on the Pecuniary Return to Geographic Mobility." Journal of Regional Science 43,3 (August 2003): 483-517.