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Source: Sociological Inquiry
Resulting in 6 citations.
1. Hannon, Lance
Poverty, Delinquency, and Educational Attainment: Cumulative Disadvantage or Disadvantage Saturation?
Sociological Inquiry 73,4 (November 2003): 575-595.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/1475-682X.00072/abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: University of Texas Press
Keyword(s): Adolescent Behavior; Delinquency/Gang Activity; Disadvantaged, Economically; Educational Attainment; Poverty; School Dropouts; School Suspension/Expulsion

Permission to reprint the abstract has been denied by the publisher.

Bibliography Citation
Hannon, Lance. "Poverty, Delinquency, and Educational Attainment: Cumulative Disadvantage or Disadvantage Saturation?" Sociological Inquiry 73,4 (November 2003): 575-595.
2. Heflin, Colleen M.
Pattillo, Mary
Kin Effects on Black-White Account and Home Ownership
Sociological Inquiry 72,2 (Spring 2002): 220-239.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/1475-682X.00014/abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Wiley Online
Keyword(s): Assets; Black Studies; Family Structure; Home Ownership; Kinship; Poverty; Racial Differences; Siblings; Socioeconomic Factors; Wealth

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This article combines the literature on kin networks and racial disparities in asset ownership. Specifically, we examine the effects of kin characteristics—sibling poverty and parental poverty, education, and occupation—on financial account ownership and home ownership. We find that kin matter for these outcomes. Having a poor sibling and coming from a poor family are negatively associated with account and home ownership while mother's education has a positive effect. Separate analyses by race suggest that kin characteristics matter for both Blacks and Whites for account ownership, but for home ownership they are significant for Whites only. Racial differences in kin characteristics account for over half of the racial gap in account ownership, but are not important for understanding the racial gap in home ownership. The significant effects of extended family characteristics on socioeconomic well-being make a case for the inclusion of kin variables in the growing literature on wealth disparities among Blacks and Whites.
Bibliography Citation
Heflin, Colleen M. and Mary Pattillo. "Kin Effects on Black-White Account and Home Ownership." Sociological Inquiry 72,2 (Spring 2002): 220-239.
3. Maroto, Michelle Lee
Pathways into Bankruptcy: Accumulating Disadvantage and the Consequences of Adverse Life Events
Sociological Inquiry 85,2 (May 2015): 183-216.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/soin.12073/abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Wiley Online
Keyword(s): Bankruptcy; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Marital Dissolution; Modeling, Fixed Effects; Net Worth; Unemployment

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study combines theories of accumulating disadvantage and economic insecurity using the event of bankruptcy to investigate how certain adverse life events jointly affect inequality. I analyze National Longitudinal Survey of Youth data from 1985 through 2008 to highlight the complexities of financial hardship in the path to bankruptcy. By applying hybrid mixed effects models to parse out within- and between-person variation, I show that, in the case of bankruptcy, financial hardship unfolds over a specific series of events, which can lead to the accumulation of disadvantage connected to changes in employment, marital, and health statuses. I find that bankruptcy results from people's recent experiences of illness and marital dissolution, but not always directly from employment disruption. The effects of job loss on bankruptcy become more apparent as these events accumulate over time and limit wealth creation. The timing of events and their relationship with net worth also influence when a person will file for bankruptcy. As a whole, my findings demonstrate how adverse events and financial hardship lead to bankruptcy through multiple pathways.
Bibliography Citation
Maroto, Michelle Lee. "Pathways into Bankruptcy: Accumulating Disadvantage and the Consequences of Adverse Life Events." Sociological Inquiry 85,2 (May 2015): 183-216.
4. McDonald, Steve
Patterns of Informal Job Matching Across the Life Course: Entry-Level, Reentry-Level, and Elite Non-Searching
Sociological Inquiry 75,3 (August 2005): 403-429.
Also: http://search.epnet.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&an=17428803
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: University of Texas Press
Keyword(s): Job Search; Life Course; Work Experience

Permission to reprint the abstract has been denied by the publisher.

Bibliography Citation
McDonald, Steve. "Patterns of Informal Job Matching Across the Life Course: Entry-Level, Reentry-Level, and Elite Non-Searching." Sociological Inquiry 75,3 (August 2005): 403-429.
5. Mitra, Aparna
The Allocation of Blacks in Large Firms and Establishments and Black-White Wage Inequality in the U.S. Economy
Sociological Inquiry 69,3 (August 1999): 382-403.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1475-682X.1999.tb00877.x/abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: University of Texas Press
Keyword(s): Racial Differences; Wage Differentials; Wage Gap; Wages

Permission to reprint the abstract has been denied by the publisher.

Bibliography Citation
Mitra, Aparna. "The Allocation of Blacks in Large Firms and Establishments and Black-White Wage Inequality in the U.S. Economy." Sociological Inquiry 69,3 (August 1999): 382-403.
6. Tyndall, Benjamin D.
Christie-Mizell, C. André
Mastery, Homeownership, and Adult Roles During the Transition to Adulthood
Sociological Inquiry 86,1 (February 2016): 5-28.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/soin.12099/abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Wiley Online
Keyword(s): Cohabitation; Employment; Home Ownership; Marriage; Parenthood; Pearlin Mastery Scale; Transition, Adulthood

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

We investigate the relationship between homeownership and personal sense of mastery in the transition to adulthood and examine whether three important adult transitions (employment, marriage/cohabitation, and parenthood) moderate the impact of homeownership on mastery. Utilizing the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth--Young Adult Sample (N = 1,609), we estimate change models to assess the direct effects of homeownership on mastery as well as whether this impact is modified by the transition to adult roles. Homeownership increases the sense of mastery among young adults. Homeowners who are unemployed paradoxically receive a boost to mastery not experienced by those who are employed, and homeowners who are parents experience increased mastery, compared to those who do not have children. Owning a home has a positive influence on young adults' sense of mastery during a period when their mastery is in flux and they are accumulating new roles.
Bibliography Citation
Tyndall, Benjamin D. and C. André Christie-Mizell. "Mastery, Homeownership, and Adult Roles During the Transition to Adulthood." Sociological Inquiry 86,1 (February 2016): 5-28.