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Source: Sociological Perspectives
Resulting in 12 citations.
1. Cozzolino, Elizabeth
Smith, Chelsea
Crosnoe, Robert
Family-related Disparities in College Enrollment across the Great Recession
Sociological Perspectives 61,5 (October 2018): 689-710.
Also: https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/0731121418760542
Cohort(s): NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Pacific Sociological Association
Keyword(s): College Enrollment; Current Population Survey (CPS) / CPS-Fertility Supplement; Economic Changes/Recession; Family History; Family Income; Geocoded Data; Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission; Unemployment Rate, Regional

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The economic crisis of the Great Recession in the late 2000s had implications for the intergenerational transmission of inequality within families. Studying patterns of college enrollment across the Great Recession among U.S. youth from diverse family contexts provides insight into how economic volatility can either compound or undercut the advantages that some parents can give their children. Although college enrollment among 18- to 21-year-olds did not decline during or after the Great Recession, analyses of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979-Young Adult cohort revealed that this general trend subsumed variability by family history, local economic conditions, and age. Histories of family stability and sufficiency were associated with higher odds of college enrollment over time and across age, but this advantage was largest during the Recession in high-unemployment communities. These results illuminate how life course consequences of early family life can fluctuate with volatility and opportunity in the broader economy.
Bibliography Citation
Cozzolino, Elizabeth, Chelsea Smith and Robert Crosnoe. "Family-related Disparities in College Enrollment across the Great Recession." Sociological Perspectives 61,5 (October 2018): 689-710.
2. Davis, Shannon N.
Pearce, Lisa D.
Adolescents' Work-Family Gender Ideologies and Educational Expectations
Sociological Perspectives 50,2 (Summer 2007): 249-271.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1525/sop.2007.50.2.249
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: University of California Press
Keyword(s): Attitudes; Educational Aspirations/Expectations; Family Structure; Gender Attitudes/Roles; Gender Differences; Religion; Religious Influences; Self-Esteem

Much empirical research has been devoted to examining how early life socialization and experiences shape adolescent aspirations. This article adds to this body of research by examining adolescent educational expectations at a crucial developmental stage with a focus on ideational processes. The authors test hypotheses derived from the Eccles et al. model of achievement-related choices regarding links between the previously neglected concept of work-family gender ideology and expected educational attainment. Using recent survey data from children of a nationally representative sample of women in the United States, the authors demonstrate a positive relationship between gender egalitarianism views of gendered work and family roles makes one more likely to desire a college education and a graduate or professional degree, although the relationship is stronger for girls than for boys. The authors' findings suggest the pivotal role of work-family gender ideologies in shaping adolescents' educational expectations and more generally highlight the importance of ideology and worldview in the construction of status attainment goals.
Bibliography Citation
Davis, Shannon N. and Lisa D. Pearce. "Adolescents' Work-Family Gender Ideologies and Educational Expectations." Sociological Perspectives 50,2 (Summer 2007): 249-271.
3. MacLean, Alair
Skills Mismatch? Military Service, Combat Occupations, and Civilian Earnings
Sociological Perspectives 60,2 (April 2017): 229-250.
Also: http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/0731121416632011
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Pacific Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Earnings; Military Service; Occupations; Veterans

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Research has evaluated the impact of military service on socioeconomic outcomes, but little research has assessed the association between such outcomes and military occupations. The following article examines this relationship by analyzing the National Longitudinal Study of Youth 1979. It evaluates whether military occupations produce associations that are consistent with hypotheses based on theories of skills mismatch, selection, or turning points. Contrary to expectations, veterans of combat occupations did not have different earnings from those of other occupations, which suggests that any apparent effects of combat exposure reflect neither skills mismatch nor selection into these roles. Yet veterans earned less than nonveterans at the same years of combined military and civilian experience, regardless of occupation. These findings indicate that employers did not value time in the military as much as time in the civilian labor market.
Bibliography Citation
MacLean, Alair. "Skills Mismatch? Military Service, Combat Occupations, and Civilian Earnings." Sociological Perspectives 60,2 (April 2017): 229-250.
4. MacLean, Alair
Parsons, Nicholas L.
Unequal Risk: Combat Occupations in the Volunteer Military
Sociological Perspectives 53,3 (Fall 2010): 347-372.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1525/sop.2010.53.3.347
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: University of California Press
Keyword(s): Armed Forces Qualifications Test (AFQT); Family Background; Military Enlistment; Military Service; Occupations; Occupations, Male

This study evaluates the characteristics of the men who served in the volunteer military in combat occupations. It examines whether these characteristics stem from supply-side or demand-side decisions, or reflect class bias. The findings suggest that, on the supply side, men who had greater academic abilities were more likely to go to college, thereby avoiding military service and the possibility of serving in a combat occupation. On the demand side, the armed forces were more likely to exclude men with lower academic abilities but were more likely to assign such men in the military to combat occupations. Net of the impacts of these supply-side and demand-side decisions, men who served in combat occupations still differed from those who did not in terms of their family background. The impact of family background was stronger on entering the military than on being assigned to combat occupations once in the military.
Bibliography Citation
MacLean, Alair and Nicholas L. Parsons. "Unequal Risk: Combat Occupations in the Volunteer Military." Sociological Perspectives 53,3 (Fall 2010): 347-372.
5. Monk-Turner, Elizabeth A.
Effects of High School Delinquency on Educational Attainment and Adult Occupational Status
Sociological Perspectives 32,3 (Autumn 1989): 413-418.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1389126
Cohort(s): Young Men
Publisher: University of California Press
Keyword(s): Delinquency/Gang Activity; Educational Attainment; Occupational Attainment; Occupational Status; Work Experience

This paper analyzes the impact of high school delinquency on adult occupational status. Using data from the NLS of Young Men, it was found that high school delinquency negatively affects educational attainment. However, when controlling for years of schooling attained and other background variables, high school delinquency does not significantly shape adult occupational status. If high school delinquents are able to obtain as much schooling as others, their past delinquency does not exert a negative independent effect on occupational achievement.
Bibliography Citation
Monk-Turner, Elizabeth A. "Effects of High School Delinquency on Educational Attainment and Adult Occupational Status." Sociological Perspectives 32,3 (Autumn 1989): 413-418.
6. Okamoto, Dina G.
England, Paula A.
Is There a Supply Side to Occupational Sex Segregation?
Sociological Perspectives 42,4 (Winter 1999): 557-583.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1389574
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: University of California Press
Keyword(s): Gender; Job Aspirations; Occupational Choice; Occupational Segregation; Occupations, Female; Occupations, Male; Sexual Division of Labor; Sociability/Socialization/Social Interaction

We examine evidence for supply-side explanations of occupational sex segregation, using the 1979-93 NLSY. Supply-side explanations, such as those derived from neoclassical economic theory and gender socialization, look to individual characteristics of workers, such as values, aspirations, and roles, to explain occupational outcomes. Contrary to human capital theory, we find no tendency for individuals with early plans for employment intermittency or more actual breaks in employment to work in predominantly female occupations. This suggests that women who anticipate breaks in employment do not choose female occupations because of lower wage penalties for time out of the labor force. A second neoclassical view, from the theory of compensating differentials, posits that women sacrifice some pay for "mother-friendly" features of jobs. Consistent with this, white and Latina mothers are in more female jobs than are nonmothers, but the opposite is true for African-American women. The gender socialization perspective posits a long-term effect of gendered attitudes and aspirations formed in youth. Consistent with this, we find that those aspiring to or expecting to work in predominantly female jobs are in more heavily female jobs fourteen years later. Also, for women (but not men), more liberal gender role attitudes predicts working in a more sex-typical occupation. For men (but not women), having had either a father or mother who worked in a female occupation predicts working in a more heavily female occupation.
Bibliography Citation
Okamoto, Dina G. and Paula A. England. "Is There a Supply Side to Occupational Sex Segregation?" Sociological Perspectives 42,4 (Winter 1999): 557-583.
7. Pitcher, Brian L.
Hong, Sung Young
Older Men's Perceptions of Personal Control: The Effect of Health Status
Sociological Perspectives 29,3 (July 1986): 397-419.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1389027
Cohort(s): Older Men
Publisher: University of California Press
Keyword(s): Age and Ageing; Control; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Locus of Control (see Rotter Scale); Rotter Scale (see Locus of Control)

Data from the Older Men's cohort of the NLS are analyzed in this study to investigate antecedents of perceptions of personal control. Particular attention is given to the effects of individual health factors. The findings support the life stress model which assumes that social conditions and environmental changes impact individual perceptions of control via opportunities and resources for carrying out efficacious actions. The analysis suggests, however, that various untested moderating conditions determine the nature and direction of the impact. Future investigations are needed to identify these moderating variables and specify their differential effects.
Bibliography Citation
Pitcher, Brian L. and Sung Young Hong. "Older Men's Perceptions of Personal Control: The Effect of Health Status." Sociological Perspectives 29,3 (July 1986): 397-419.
8. Powers, Daniel A.
Transitions into Idleness Among White, Black, and Hispanic Youth: Some Determinants and Policy Implications of Weak Labor Force Attachment
Sociological Perspectives 37,2 (Summer 1994): 183-201.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1389319
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: University of California Press
Keyword(s): Employment, Youth; Hispanics; Human Capital; Labor Force Participation; Racial Differences; Sociability/Socialization/Social Interaction; Social Environment; Social Influences; Training; Transitional Programs

Explores determinants of entering labor market inactivity for 1,731 initially active young men, ages 14-17, drawing on data from 7 waves (1979-1985) of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth. Results indicate that social context variables play a key role in explaining weak labor force attachment among young nonwhite men, but are relatively less important for white youth. Local opportunity structure & individual human capital characteristics are the most important determinants of inactivity for youth as a whole. These findings encourage a social policy solution centered around job creation & training programs that smooth the transition between school & work. 5 Tables, 2 Figures, 26 References. Adapted from the source document. (Copyright 1994, Sociological Abstracts, Inc., all rights reserved.)
Bibliography Citation
Powers, Daniel A. "Transitions into Idleness Among White, Black, and Hispanic Youth: Some Determinants and Policy Implications of Weak Labor Force Attachment." Sociological Perspectives 37,2 (Summer 1994): 183-201.
9. Teachman, Jay D.
Family Life Course Statuses and Transitions: Relationships with Health Limitations
Sociological Perspectives 53,2 (Summer 2010): 201–219.
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: University of California Press
Keyword(s): Divorce; Family Structure; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Life Course; Marital Status; Marriage; Modeling, Fixed Effects; Parenthood; Turbulence

In this study, the author uses 25 years of data taken from the 1979 National Longitudinal Study of Youth to examine the relationship between family life course statuses and transitions and work-related health limitations. The author uses a detailed set of statuses and transitions that include marriage, divorce, cohabitation, and parenthood. The measures of health used tap health limitations in the kind and amount of work that can be performed. Using a fixed-effects estimator for dichotomous outcomes, the author finds that marriage is positively related to the health of men but negatively related to the health of women. The author also finds that parenthood is not related to the health of men but is positively related to the health of women. The results also indicate that statuses are more important for determining health limitations than are transitions.
Bibliography Citation
Teachman, Jay D. "Family Life Course Statuses and Transitions: Relationships with Health Limitations." Sociological Perspectives 53,2 (Summer 2010): 201–219.
10. Teachman, Jay D.
Tedrow, Lucky M.
Anderson, Carter
The Relationship between Military Service and Childbearing for Men and Women
Sociological Perspectives 58,4 (December 2015): 595-608.
Also: http://spx.sagepub.com/content/58/4/595.abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Pacific Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Childbearing; Fertility; Gender Differences; Military Service; Modeling, Fixed Effects

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Using data taken from the 1997 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY-97), we examine the relationship between military service and childbearing for both men and women. Using a fixed-effects procedure on longitudinal data, we find that military service reduces the fertility of male and female recruits. The negative effect of military service is much larger for women than for men. In addition, the negative effects of military service on childbearing persist after service members leave the military, although the effects diminish over time. Overall, even though military service may not lead to lower completed fertility, the evidence suggests a delaying effect on childbearing.
Bibliography Citation
Teachman, Jay D., Lucky M. Tedrow and Carter Anderson. "The Relationship between Military Service and Childbearing for Men and Women." Sociological Perspectives 58,4 (December 2015): 595-608.
11. Triplett, Ruth
Jarjoura, G. Roger
Specifying the Gender-Class-Delinquency Relationship: Exploring the Effects of Educational Expectations
Sociological Perspectives 40,2 (Summer 1997): 287-316.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1389526
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: University of California Press
Keyword(s): Crime; Delinquency/Gang Activity; Educational Aspirations/Expectations; Educational Attainment; Gender Differences; Social Roles

Explores the role of educational expectation, as shaped by both class and gender, in delinquency, drawing on data from a sample of 4,587 respondents, ages 14-18, from two waves of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth. Three issues are focal: (1) Is social class significantly related to female, as well as male, delinquency? (2) Does social class shape educational expectations and do they, in turn, enhance the likelihood of delinquent involvement? (3) Are there gender differences in the ways that social class conditions educational expectations? Findings suggest that gender and class are both important factors shaping educaitonal expectations and through them, delinquency.
Bibliography Citation
Triplett, Ruth and G. Roger Jarjoura. "Specifying the Gender-Class-Delinquency Relationship: Exploring the Effects of Educational Expectations." Sociological Perspectives 40,2 (Summer 1997): 287-316.
12. Wadsworth, Tim
The Meaning of Work: Conceptualizing the Deterrent Effect of Employment on Crime Among Young Adults
Sociological Perspectives 49,3 (Fall 2006): 343-368.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1525/sop.2006.49.3.343
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: University of California Press
Keyword(s): Academic Development; Behavior, Violent; Crime; Delinquency/Gang Activity; Educational Attainment; Youth Problems

Data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY) are used to examine the influence of employment characteristics and other age-appropriate investments on young adults' participation in both violent and property crime. The findings suggest that quality of employment has a stronger influence on individuals' involvement in both economic and noneconomic criminal behavior than do income, job stability, educational achievement, and a variety of background factors. The implications of these findings for theoretical development and public policy are discussed.
Bibliography Citation
Wadsworth, Tim. "The Meaning of Work: Conceptualizing the Deterrent Effect of Employment on Crime Among Young Adults." Sociological Perspectives 49,3 (Fall 2006): 343-368.