Search Results

Source: Washington Post
Resulting in 36 citations.
1. Badger, Emily
How Free Preschool May Help Poor Kids When They Become Parents
Washington Post, August 24, 2016, Wonkblog.
Also: https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/wonk/wp/2016/08/24/how-free-preschool-may-help-poor-kids-when-they-become-parents/?utm_term=.f212257f3892
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Washington Post
Keyword(s): College Degree; Educational Attainment; Head Start; High School Completion/Graduates; Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

[Excerpts from newspaper article] A new analysis from the Hamilton Project suggests that the lives today [of the first children of Head Start] are measurably better in some important ways than those of poor children who never enrolled in the program. Their chances of finishing high school, attending college and earning postsecondary degrees or certificates were higher. [This news story was based on research by Bauer, Lauren and Diane Whitmore Schanzenbach. "The Long-Term Impact of the Head Start Program." Economic Analysis, The Hamilton Project, Brookings Institution, August 19, 2016.]
Bibliography Citation
Badger, Emily. "How Free Preschool May Help Poor Kids When They Become Parents." Washington Post, August 24, 2016, Wonkblog.
2. Boodman, Sandra G.
New Findings Contradict Experts' Long-Held View; Big Families: Not Necessarily Duller
Washington Post, June 27, 2000, Health; Pg. Z06
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: Washington Post
Keyword(s): Birth Order; Children, Academic Development; Cognitive Ability; Family Formation; Family Size; Family Studies

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This article reports on the American Psychologist study (Rodgers et al.) which utilizes Children of the NLSY79 data to dispel the myth that larger family size causes children with lower IQs.
Bibliography Citation
Boodman, Sandra G. "New Findings Contradict Experts' Long-Held View; Big Families: Not Necessarily Duller." Washington Post, June 27, 2000, Health; Pg. Z06.
3. Boodman, Sandra G.
Sick Leave Inadequate For Many U.S. Families
Washington Post, September 10, 1996, Health; Pg. Z05
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Washington Post
Keyword(s): Child Care; Child Health; Health Care; Maternal Employment; Parents, Behavior; Poverty

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This article reports on S. Jody Heymann's study of the amount of sick leave families require to take care of children or aging relatives. The study, which utilized NLSY79 data, finds that 30% of families require more than two weeks of sick leave per year.
Bibliography Citation
Boodman, Sandra G. "Sick Leave Inadequate For Many U.S. Families." Washington Post, September 10, 1996, Health; Pg. Z05.
4. Boodman, Sandra G.
Study Urges Campaign On Teen Second Births
Washington Post, September 13, 1994, Health; Page Z5
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Washington Post
Keyword(s): Adolescent Fertility; Childbearing; Educational Attainment; Educational Status; Ethnic Groups; Family Background; Marital Status; Mothers, Adolescent; Mothers, Education; Parental Marital Status; Pregnancy and Pregnancy Outcomes; Pregnancy, Adolescent; Socioeconomic Factors

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This article reports on Kalmuss and Namerow's study of teenage mothers. The abstract from their published study is as follows: Data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth reveal that approximately one-quarter of teenage mothers have a second child within 24 months of their first birth. The prevalence of closely spaced second births is greatest (31%) among young women whose first birth occurred prior to age 17. Teenage mothers' characteristics before the first birth (such as race or ethnicity and parents' level of education) and at the time of the first birth (such as years of schooling completed and whether their first birth was wanted) influence whether they have a rapid second birth. For example, those with more educated parents are less likely than others to have had a closely spaced second birth. In addition, young mothers who obtain additional schooling in the period after their first birth are less likely to have a closely spaced second birth, while those who marry are more likely to have a rapid second birth.
Bibliography Citation
Boodman, Sandra G. "Study Urges Campaign On Teen Second Births." Washington Post, September 13, 1994, Health; Page Z5.
5. Cha, Ariana Eunjung
Loathe Your Job in Your 20s or 30s? That May Hurt Your Health by Your 40s
Washington Post, August 23, 2016, To Your Health section
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Washington Post
Keyword(s): Health, Mental; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Job Satisfaction; Life Course

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

An analysis by Ohio State University's Jonathan Dirlam and Hui Zheng, presented this week [August 2016] at the American Sociological Association's annual meeting, shows that job satisfaction in your late 20s and 30s appears to be linked to your health in your 40s.
Bibliography Citation
Cha, Ariana Eunjung. "Loathe Your Job in Your 20s or 30s? That May Hurt Your Health by Your 40s." Washington Post, August 23, 2016, To Your Health section.
6. Ehrenfreund, Max
Black Teens Who Commit a Few Crimes Go to Jail as Often as White Teens Who Commit Dozens
Washington Post, January 30, 2015, Wonkblog
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY97
Publisher: Washington Post
Keyword(s):

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

[Excerpts from newspaper article] Boys are less likely to commit crimes but they are more likely to be placed in a correctional facility than they were three decades ago, according to a new study that shows the justice system for juvenile offenders has become much more punitive. The trends are particularly pronounced among boys from racial minorities, according to the paper by Tia Stevens Andersen of the University of South Carolina and Michigan State University's Merry Morash.

The study compared results from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth in 1980 and 2000, which is the latest date for which detailed data are available. Surveyors asked youth whether they had stolen, destroyed property, attacked someone or sold drugs in the last year. Of the boys between the ages of 15 and 18 surveyed in 1980, 59 percent said they had, compared to just 28 percent of similarly aged boys surveyed in 2000.

Bibliography Citation
Ehrenfreund, Max. "Black Teens Who Commit a Few Crimes Go to Jail as Often as White Teens Who Commit Dozens." Washington Post, January 30, 2015, Wonkblog.
7. Ehrenfreund, Max
Poor White Kids Are less Likely to Go to Prison than Rich Black Kids
Washington Post, March 23, 2016, Wonkblog
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Washington Post
Keyword(s): Black Youth; Incarceration/Jail; Racial Equality/Inequality; Socioeconomic Background

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

[Excerpts from newspaper article]

In recent decades, rich black kids have been more likely to go to prison than poor white kids.

"Race trumps class, at least when it comes to incarceration," said Darrick Hamilton of the New School, one of the researchers who produced the study.

He and his colleagues, Khaing Zaw and William Darity of Duke University, examined data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, a national study that began in 1979 and followed a group of young people into adulthood and middle age. The participants were asked about their assets and debts, and interviewers also noted their type of residence, including whether they were in a jail or prison.

Bibliography Citation
Ehrenfreund, Max. "Poor White Kids Are less Likely to Go to Prison than Rich Black Kids." Washington Post, March 23, 2016, Wonkblog.
8. Ehrenfreund, Max
The Fascinating Connection between How Much Married People Make and How Likely They Are to Cheat
Washington Post, June 4, 2015, Wonkblog.
Also: https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/wonk/wp/2015/06/04/the-curious-relationship-between-how-much-married-people-make-and-how-likely-they-are-to-cheat/?utm_term=.07ae8bf72fd5
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Washington Post
Keyword(s): Husbands, Income; Marital Conflict; Marital Instability; Wives, Income

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Why husbands and wives cheat is one of the most difficult, painful and unanswerable questions of society. But a new study suggests, if not a reason for infidelity, an important piece of context. It turns out, according to [a] study in [the] American Sociological Review, that husbands and wives cheat more when their spouses make a lot more money. In other words, husbands and wives are less likely to cheat when they are both contributing equally to the household's earnings. [News media article is based on Munsch, Christin L. "Her Support, His Support: Money, Masculinity, and Marital Infidelity." American Sociological Review 80,3 (June 2015): 469-495]
Bibliography Citation
Ehrenfreund, Max. "The Fascinating Connection between How Much Married People Make and How Likely They Are to Cheat." Washington Post, June 4, 2015, Wonkblog.
9. Ferdman, Roberto A.
One of America's Healthiest Trends Has Had a Pretty Unexpected Side Effect
Washington Post, May 24, 2016, Wonkblog
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY97
Publisher: Washington Post
Keyword(s): Body Mass Index (BMI); Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Obesity; Smoking (see Cigarette Use)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This newspaper blog article discusses the Baum and Chou journal article "Why Has the Prevalence of Obesity Doubled?" (published in Review of Economics of the Household, Volume 14, Issue 2, 2016). In particular, the blog author highlights the findings showing that decreases in cigarette smoking might explain some of the increases in obesity and BMI.
Bibliography Citation
Ferdman, Roberto A. "One of America's Healthiest Trends Has Had a Pretty Unexpected Side Effect." Washington Post, May 24, 2016, Wonkblog.
10. Fineman, Susan
In Some Families, It Pays to Be a Teen
Washtington Post, January 22, 2000, Prince William Extra; Pg. V02
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Washington Post
Keyword(s): Allowance, Pocket Money; Teenagers

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This article is a reading comprehension exercise for children. The subject is NLSY data indicating that teens who receive an allowance "typically" receive $50 per week. A quote from a Columbus area teen who reports a $100 per week allowance is used to buttress the NLSY data.
Bibliography Citation
Fineman, Susan. "In Some Families, It Pays to Be a Teen." Washtington Post, January 22, 2000, Prince William Extra; Pg. V02.
11. Fletcher, Michael A.
Many in U.S. Slip from Middle Class, Study Finds
Washington Post, September 6, 2011, Business
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Washington Post
Keyword(s): Armed Forces Qualifications Test (AFQT); College Education; Divorce; Drug Use; Economic Changes/Recession; Education; Racial Differences; Socioeconomic Status (SES)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

[Excerpts from newspaper article] Nearly one in three Americans who grew up middle-class has slipped down the income ladder as an adult, according to a new report by the Pew Charitable Trusts.

Downward mobility is most common among middle-class people who are divorced or separated from their spouses, did not attend college, scored poorly on standardized tests, or used hard drugs, the report says.

Overall, African American men have a particularly hard time clinging to middle-class status. Thirty-eight percent of black men who grew up middle-class are downwardly mobile, nearly double the rate of white men, the report says. Hispanic men are slightly more likely than white males to fall down the economic ladder, but the difference was not statistically significant.

The findings in the report are drawn from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, a group of 12,000 interviews that researchers have followed since 1979.

Bibliography Citation
Fletcher, Michael A. "Many in U.S. Slip from Middle Class, Study Finds." Washington Post, September 6, 2011, Business.
12. Ginsberg, Steven
Switching Tracks In Search of the Right Career Path; For Young, Skilled Workers Who Jump From Job to Job, Earnings Potential Might Not Be Affected, But Benefits Are
Washington Post, April 05, 1998, Financial; Pg. H04.
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Washington Post
Keyword(s): Employment; Job Satisfaction; Job Search; Job Turnover; Occupational Aspirations; Wage Levels; Wages; Work History

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This article discusses the impact of young workers switching employers on their future wages. The article cites NLSY data which indicates that switching jobs early in one's career does not have a negative impact on future wages and that men who switched jobs earned 5-7% more than those who stayed with one employer.
Bibliography Citation
Ginsberg, Steven. "Switching Tracks In Search of the Right Career Path; For Young, Skilled Workers Who Jump From Job to Job, Earnings Potential Might Not Be Affected, But Benefits Are." Washington Post, April 05, 1998, Financial; Pg. H04.
13. McEwen, Lauren
Living Together Is Basically the Same as Marriage, Study Finds
Washington Post, December 10, 2015.
Also: https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/soloish/wp/2015/12/10/living-together-is-basically-the-same-as-marriage-study-finds
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Washington Post
Keyword(s): Cohabitation; Health, Mental; Marital History/Transitions

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

For "emerging adults," or those in their 20s, cohabitation may offer the same emotional health benefits as marriage, according to a recent study published by the Journal of Family Psychology. [News article based on research by Mernitz, Sara E. and Claire M. Kamp Dush. "Emotional Health Across the Transition to First and Second Unions Among Emerging Adults." Journal of Family Psychology 30,2 (March 2016): 233-244]
Bibliography Citation
McEwen, Lauren. "Living Together Is Basically the Same as Marriage, Study Finds." Washington Post, December 10, 2015.
14. Mooney, Chris
Paper Finds a Surprising Link between Warmer Temperatures and Math Test Scores
Washington Post, May 12, 2015, Energy and Environment.
Also: https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/energy-environment/wp/2015/05/12/paper-finds-a-surprising-link-between-warm-temperatures-and-math-test-scores/?utm_term=.0021c4fba45d
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: Washington Post
Keyword(s): Environment, Pollution/Urban Density; Geocoded Data; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading); Test Scores/Test theory/IRT; Testing Conditions

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

[Excerpted from the news article] Drawing on existing literature on how warmer temperatures can affect the brain, the researchers examined children's test scores from the NLSY. The dataset allowed them to overlay test scores with the average temperature in the county where they lived on the day of testing. Math performance declined significantly, though reading scores did not.

Note: This news item was based on a 2015 NBER working paper later published as the following journal article: Zivin, Joshua Graff, Solomon M. Hsiang and Matthew J. Neidell. "Temperature and Human Capital in the Short- and Long-Run." Journal of the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists 5,1 (January 2018): 77-105.

Bibliography Citation
Mooney, Chris. "Paper Finds a Surprising Link between Warmer Temperatures and Math Test Scores." Washington Post, May 12, 2015, Energy and Environment.
15. Morin, Richard
Is Eye Color Associated With Alcoholism Abuse?
Washington Post, September 16, 2001, Outlook; Pg. B05
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Washington Post
Keyword(s): Addiction; Alcohol Use

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This article reports on Jonathan Basset and James Dabb's study of the correlation between eye color and alcohol abuse. Using NLSY data, they find that light-eyed individuals have higher rates of alcohol abuse than dark-eyed individuals.
Bibliography Citation
Morin, Richard. "Is Eye Color Associated With Alcoholism Abuse?." Washington Post, September 16, 2001, Outlook; Pg. B05.
16. Morin, Richard
It Helps, Even If You Fake It/Property Value
Washington Post, Sunday, March 30, 2003, Final Edition, Outlook; Pg. B05.
Also: http://www.washingtonpost.com/ac2/wp-dyn?pagename=article&node=&contentId=A45195-2003Mar28¬Found=true
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Washington Post
Keyword(s): Adolescent Behavior; Education; Home Ownership; Schooling

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Newspaper article on study by Donald R. Haurin, professor of economics at Ohio State University, that found that parent home ownership positively affects their children's academic performance. The Study utilized NLSY79 Youth and Child data.
Bibliography Citation
Morin, Richard. "It Helps, Even If You Fake It/Property Value." Washington Post, Sunday, March 30, 2003, Final Edition, Outlook; Pg. B05.
17. Morin, Richard
More Evidence That Lefties Have the Right Stuff
Washington Post, August 9, 2006: Pg. A02.
Also: http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2006/08/08/AR2006080801631.html
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Washington Post
Keyword(s): Earnings; Education; Gender Differences; Handedness; Labor Market Demographics

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This article reports on the work of Ruebeck, Harrington, and Moffit, who studied the correlation between right- and left-handedness and earnings. They found that left-handed men earn more than their right-handed counterparts, while right- and left-handed women earn the same amount.
Bibliography Citation
Morin, Richard. "More Evidence That Lefties Have the Right Stuff." Washington Post, August 9, 2006: Pg. A02.
18. Morin, Richard
New Facts and Hot Stats from the Social Sciences
Washington Post, December 18, 1994, Outlook; Pg. C5
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Washington Post
Keyword(s): Economics of Minorities; I.Q.; Racial Differences; Test Scores/Test theory/IRT; Wage Gap

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This article reports on arguments made against Murray and Herrnstein's "The Bell Curve," a study which utilized NLSY79 data. Carnoy's study, based on "much of the same data as Herrnstein and Murray," maintains that Asian-American's high test scores prove that the wage gap is not solely based on race or I.Q. Thomas argues that the NLSY79 data relied on in "The Bell Curve" only tracked people into their twenties, whereas wage disparities based on race typically become more pronounced when an individual is in his or her thirties.
Bibliography Citation
Morin, Richard. "New Facts and Hot Stats from the Social Sciences." Washington Post, December 18, 1994, Outlook; Pg. C5.
19. Morin, Richard
Prescription for a Longer Life
Washington Post, April 18, 2004, Outlook section; B05
Cohort(s): Older Men
Publisher: Washington Post
Keyword(s): Male Sample; Mortality

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Newspaper article citing article in Demography by Mark D. Hayward and Bridget K. Gorman on the relationship of childhood circumstances to lifespan.
Bibliography Citation
Morin, Richard. "Prescription for a Longer Life." Washington Post, April 18, 2004, Outlook section; B05.
20. Morin, Richard
Shotgun Wedding Magic
Washington Post, November 11, 2001, Outlook; Pg. B05
Cohort(s): Young Men
Publisher: Washington Post
Keyword(s): Earnings; Earnings, Husbands; Husbands, Income; Marriage; Wage Determination; Wages; Wages, Men

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This article reports on Donna Ginther and Madeline Zavodny's study of the "marriage premium," the phenomenon of married men earning more than bachelors. Using NLS Young Men data, they analyze the earnings of men who were involved in "shotgun weddings" to discern whether it is the marital status which produces the increased wage or if it is simply that the qualities an employer finds desirable are also the qualities a spouse desires
Bibliography Citation
Morin, Richard. "Shotgun Wedding Magic." Washington Post, November 11, 2001, Outlook; Pg. B05.
21. Morin, Richard
Spillover Effect
Washington Post, April 18, 2002, Outlook; Pg. B05.
Also: http://www.washingtonpost.com/ac2/wp-dyn?pagename=article&node=&contentId=A29295-2002Aug17¬Found=true
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Washington Post
Keyword(s): College Education; College Graduates; Earnings; Economic Well-Being; Economics, Demographic; Economics, Regional; Education; Educational Returns; High School Dropouts

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Article on UCLA economist Enrico Moretti's "spillover effect," the theory that an increase in the proportion of college graduates in an area affects all worker's wages. High school dropouts experienced the greatest gain.
Bibliography Citation
Morin, Richard. "Spillover Effect." Washington Post, April 18, 2002, Outlook; Pg. B05.
22. Morin, Richard
Unconventional Wisdom: New Facts and Hot Stats from the Social Sciences. The Happy (Later) Life Of Orphanage Alums
Washington Post, 119, (Jan 14, 1996): C5 col 2
Cohort(s): Mature Women, NLS General
Publisher: Washington Post
Keyword(s): Career Patterns; Foster Care; Wages, Women; Women; Women's Studies

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Career vs. Family: The overwhelming majority of women still don't have it all. But the chances of getting a big chunk of it are improving for women who seek careers and families. Only about one out of seven women currently between the ages of 38 and 51 has managed to "have it all": A successful career and a family, reports Claudia Goldin, a research associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research. Goldin analyzed U.S. Census figures as well as data collected from thousands of women who participated in the National Longitudinal Survey, a massive study that began tracking the lives of thousands of young women beginning in 1968. Among middle-aged women with successful careers, only half had children. And among women who had children, fewer than one in five had achieved professional success, Goldin said. She defined professional success for a woman in a number of ways, including "exceeding the income of the male college graduate at the top of the bottom 25 percent of male graduates in two or three consecutive years. "Her definition of family was more straightforward: Having at least one child.
Bibliography Citation
Morin, Richard. "Unconventional Wisdom: New Facts and Hot Stats from the Social Sciences. The Happy (Later) Life Of Orphanage Alums." Washington Post, 119, (Jan 14, 1996): C5 col 2.
23. Morin, Richard
Unconventional Wisdom: The Marriage Money Gap
Washington Post, Sunday, May 25, 2003: Page B05.
Also: http://www.washingtonpost.com/ac2/wp-dyn?pagename=article&node=&contentId=A33612-2003May23¬Found=true
Cohort(s): Mature Women, NLSY79, Older Men, Young Men, Young Women
Publisher: Washington Post
Keyword(s): Earnings, Husbands; Earnings, Wives; Economic Well-Being; Family Income; Husbands, Income; Wives, Income

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Do husbands and wives have the same view of the family's financial situation? This research shows that when couples are asked separately about finances, very different views emerge of income and wealth. Quantifying the gap between husbands' and wives' financial statements shows half of all couples provide family income values that differ by more than 10% and net worth values that differ by more than 30%. The typical husband states the family receives more income each year and holds more gross assets than his wife states. The typical wife reports the family owes more debts than her husband.
Bibliography Citation
Morin, Richard. "Unconventional Wisdom: The Marriage Money Gap." Washington Post, Sunday, May 25, 2003: Page B05.
24. Morin, Richard
Up in Smoke
Washington Post, February 13, 2005: Pg. B05.
Also: http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A18475-2005Feb12.html
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Washington Post
Keyword(s): Assets; Cigarette Use (see Smoking); Smoking (see Cigarette Use); Wealth

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This article uses Jay Zagorsky's study on the effect of smoking on wealth. NLSY79 data show that non-smokers have a higher net worth than smokers do.
Bibliography Citation
Morin, Richard. "Up in Smoke." Washington Post, February 13, 2005: Pg. B05.
25. Morin, Richard
Deane, Claudia
Welfare Reform Reforms Teens, Study Says
Washington Post, (May 28, 2002): A15.
Also: http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A18727-2002May27.html
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY97
Publisher: Washington Post
Keyword(s): Adolescent Fertility; Behavior; Birth Rate; Educational Attainment; Household Composition; Legislation; Mothers, Education; Parents, Single; School Dropouts; Teenagers; Welfare

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Welfare reform has reduced the birth rate among teenage women who are at the greatest risk of going on public assistance, cut their welfare use and lowered their school dropout rate, according to a paper published last week by the National Bureau of Economic Research. Economists Robert Kaestner and June O'Neill of Baruch College in New York also said that teenage mothers were less likely to go on the dole and "more likely to live with a spouse or to live with at least one parent than in the pre-reform era." If confirmed by additional studies, these results suggest that the 1996 act overhauling the welfare system may be doing what parents, government and social agencies have failed to do: change the behaviors of teenagers -- particularly those most at risk of falling into welfare, Kaestner and O'Neill said. They based their conclusions on a detailed analysis of data from the federally funded National Longitudinal Survey of Youth. This ongoing series of polls annually samples young people and then reinterviews them in succeeding years. Kaestner and O'Neill were particularly interested in tracking the fortunes of "high risk" girls aged 17 and 19 in the 1979 sample and a group of similarly aged teens in the 1997 survey. Both groups were followed for about three years. High-risk teens were defined as girls who, among other things, lived at age 12 in a family headed by a single female and had a mother with relatively little education. The authors found that 28 percent of the 19-year-olds in the 1979 study group had given birth, compared with 19 percent in the 1997 group. The dropout rate stood at 26 percent among 19-year-olds in the 1979 sample but at 16 percent in the most recent group. About 10 percent of these teens in the earlier study had received welfare, compared with 5 percent in the post-reform group. The study comes at a politically propitious time. The 1996 welfare act expires in the fall. The House recently passed a Republican welfare plan but the Senate has not yet voted on welfare legislation.
Bibliography Citation
Morin, Richard and Claudia Deane. "Welfare Reform Reforms Teens, Study Says." Washington Post, (May 28, 2002): A15.
26. Paquette, Danielle
No, Millennials Aren’t Killing Stable Employment
Washington Post, August 28, 2017, Wonkblog.
Also: https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/wonk/wp/2017/08/28/no-millennials-arent-killing-stable-employment/?utm_term=.5840bae8e5d2
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Washington Post
Keyword(s): Job Tenure; Job Turnover

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

A new report from the Bureau of Labor Statistics suggests the older generation wasn't that much more rooted than the younger one. People born between 1957 and 1964, the later end of the baby boom, held an average of 11.9 jobs from age 18 to age 50, according to the Economic News Release from BLS, released August 24, 2017.
Bibliography Citation
Paquette, Danielle. "No, Millennials Aren’t Killing Stable Employment." Washington Post, August 28, 2017, Wonkblog.
27. Paquette, Danielle
The Quiet Struggle of Male Breadwinners
Washington Post, August 19, 2016, Wonkblog.
Also: https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/wonk/wp/2016/08/19/the-quiet-struggle-of-male-breadwinners
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Washington Post
Keyword(s): Earnings, Husbands; Earnings, Wives; Gender Attitudes/Roles; Marital Conflict

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

News article based on research by Munsch, Christin L. "Her Support, His Support: Money, Masculinity, and Marital Infidelity." American Sociological Review 80,3 (June 2015): 469-495.
Bibliography Citation
Paquette, Danielle. "The Quiet Struggle of Male Breadwinners." Washington Post, August 19, 2016, Wonkblog.
28. Raspberry, William
Kids Whose Goals Are Too Modest
Washington Post, August 15, 1998, Editorial; Page A13
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Washington Post
Keyword(s): Adolescent Behavior; Dropouts; Learning Motivation; Pregnancy, Adolescent; School Dropouts; Schooling; Youth Problems

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This article reports on studies analyzing the poor performance of "at-risk" youth as a symptom of their failure to properly envision their role in adult society or their fulfillment of future roles that are "too modest." Sue Berryman's research, which utilizes NLSY79 data, is emphasized.
Bibliography Citation
Raspberry, William. "Kids Whose Goals Are Too Modest." Washington Post, August 15, 1998, Editorial; Page A13.
29. Raspberry, William
The Best Preventive: Education
Washington Post, September 22, 1986, Editorial; Page A17
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Washington Post
Keyword(s): Adolescent Behavior; Education; Hispanics; Pregnancy, Adolescent

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This article reports on a Children's Defense Fund study of the relationship between academic education and teenage pregnancy. Using NLSY data, the study finds that "young women with poor or fair basic skills are three to four times as likely as those with average skills to have more than one child while in their teens -- a pattern that remains consistent for black, white and Hispanic teen-agers."
Bibliography Citation
Raspberry, William. "The Best Preventive: Education." Washington Post, September 22, 1986, Editorial; Page A17.
30. Rich, Spencer
Teen Fathers Trouble-Prone In Other Ways, Study Finds
Washington Post, January 8, 1988: Page A11
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Washington Post
Keyword(s): Adolescent Behavior; Crime; Delinquency/Gang Activity; Fatherhood; Pregnancy, Adolescent; Teenagers

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This article reports on Arthur Elster's study of the relationship between teenage fatherhood and trouble with the law. Using NLSY79 data, Elster finds that "there are various problem behaviors that seem to cluster together, including teen fatherhood, school problems, drugs and delinquency."
Bibliography Citation
Rich, Spencer. "Teen Fathers Trouble-Prone In Other Ways, Study Finds." Washington Post, January 8, 1988: Page A11.
31. Singletary, Michelle
Making No Allowance for Values
Washington Post, Sunday, (Jan 9, 2000): H01
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Washington Post
Keyword(s): Allowance, Pocket Money; Income Level; Parenthood; Teenagers; Transfers, Parental

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

These days, however, millions of kids are on their parents' payroll. In a survey by researchers at Ohio State University, half the children surveyed get a regular allowance, according to a survey by researchers at Ohio State University. But half of all teens aren't getting any money, and of the half that do, 25 percent get less than $7 a week. Not surprisingly, parents who earned less gave smaller allowances. As income rose, so did the allowance. The allowance survey was based on lengthy personal interviews conducted with nearly 9,000 randomly chosen teenagers participating in the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth. It was sponsored in part by the Labor Department and profiled in last month's issue of American Demographics magazine. "Allowance" was defined as any money disbursed to children by parents, other relatives or guardians.
Bibliography Citation
Singletary, Michelle. "Making No Allowance for Values." Washington Post, Sunday, (Jan 9, 2000): H01.
32. Squires, Sally
Price for Early School
Washington Post, May 13, 1997, Health; Pg. Z07
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Washington Post
Keyword(s): Behavioral Problems; Children; Children, Academic Development; Children, School-Age; Education; Peers/Peer influence/Peer relations; Schooling

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This article reports on Michael Weitzman's study of the effects of enrolling children younger than 5 in kindergarten. Utilizing NLSY79 and Children of the NLSY79 data, the study finds that children who entered kindergarten younger than their peers were twice as likely to have behavior problems and more than four times as likely to have academic problems as the children who were the average age.
Bibliography Citation
Squires, Sally. "Price for Early School." Washington Post, May 13, 1997, Health; Pg. Z07.
33. Swanson, Ana
Most Thieves Are Actually Really Bad at What They Do
Washington Post, October 12, 2015, Wonkblog.
Also: https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/wonk/wp/2015/10/12/the-surprising-truth-about-how-many-of-us-are-actually-thieves/?utm_term=.26cd59c15767
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Washington Post
Keyword(s): Adolescent Behavior; Crime

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

According to a new study of long-term data on theft, the typical story is one of bumbling teens, most of whom quickly grow out of their bad habits. Most thieves are active only for a short period of time and make very little money at it, economist Geoffrey Fain Williams of Transylvania University has found. In fact, theft looks not so much like a way of getting free stuff or money as a stage some people experience in adolescence -- and most grow out of. [News media article based on Williams, Geoffrey. "Property Crime: Investigating Career Patterns and Earnings." Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization 119 (November 2015): 124-138]
Bibliography Citation
Swanson, Ana. "Most Thieves Are Actually Really Bad at What They Do." Washington Post, October 12, 2015, Wonkblog.
34. Swanson, Ana
Small Families Are Better for Kids, New Research Says
Washington Post, January 1, 2016, Wonkblog.
Also: https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/wonk/wp/2016/01/01/small-families-are-better-for-kids-according-to-new-research/?utm_term=.6d92540e0816
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Washington Post
Keyword(s): Armed Forces Qualifications Test (AFQT); Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Cognitive Ability; Family Size; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Noncognitive Skills; Parental Investments; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

A paper from three economists that looks at 26 years of data on parents and children suggests that with every additional kid born, the other siblings are more likely to suffer from lower cognitive abilities and more behavioral issues, and have worse outcomes later in life. [News media article based on Juhn, Chinhui, Yona Rubinstein and Charles Andrew Zuppann. "The Quantity-Quality Trade-off and the Formation of Cognitive and Non-cognitive Skills." NBER Working Paper No. 21824, National Bureau of Economic Research, December 2015]
Bibliography Citation
Swanson, Ana. "Small Families Are Better for Kids, New Research Says." Washington Post, January 1, 2016, Wonkblog.
35. Vedantam, Shankar
Study Ties Wage Disparities To Outlook on Gender Roles
Washington Post, Monday, September 22, 2008: Page A02.
Also: http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2008/09/21/AR2008092102529.html?hpid=topnews
Cohort(s): NLS General, NLSY79
Publisher: Washington Post
Keyword(s): Gender Differences; Men's Studies; Wage Gap; Women's Roles; Women's Studies

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Men with egalitarian attitudes about the role of women in society earn significantly less on average than men who hold more traditional views about women's place in the world, according to a study being reported today.

It is the first time social scientists have produced evidence that large numbers of men might be victims of gender-related income disparities. The study raises the provocative possibility that a substantial part of the widely discussed gap in income between men and women who do the same work is really a gap between men with a traditional outlook and everyone else.

Bibliography Citation
Vedantam, Shankar. "Study Ties Wage Disparities To Outlook on Gender Roles." Washington Post, Monday, September 22, 2008: Page A02.
36. Vobeja, Barbara
Mothers' Employment Works for Children; Study Finds No Long-Term Damage
Washington Post, March 1, 1999, A Section; Pg. A01
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Washington Post
Keyword(s): Children, Academic Development; Children, Behavioral Development; Cognitive Development; Employment; Maternal Employment

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This article reports on Elizabeth Harvey's study of the relationship between maternal employment and child development. The study, which utilizes NLSY79 and Children of the NLSY79 data, found that children of working mothers did not suffer any permanent behavioral, psychological, or academic harm.
Bibliography Citation
Vobeja, Barbara. "Mothers' Employment Works for Children; Study Finds No Long-Term Damage." Washington Post, March 1, 1999, A Section; Pg. A01.