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Title: African American and White Mothers' Substance Abuse, Depression, and Criminality as Risk Factors for Child Behavior Problems
Resulting in 1 citation.
1. Smith-McKeever, T. Chedgzsey
Falconnier, Lydia
Gao, Weihua
African American and White Mothers' Substance Abuse, Depression, and Criminality as Risk Factors for Child Behavior Problems
Families in Society: The Journal of Contemporary Social Services 92,1 (January 2011): 63-68.
Also: http://www.familiesinsociety.org/ArticleArchive/2011/92-1_smith-mckeever.pdf
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Alliance for Children and Families
Keyword(s): Addiction; Age at First Birth; Alcohol Use; Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Behavioral Problems; Black Family; Black Studies; Depression (see also CESD); Drug Use; First Birth; Health, Mental; Risk-Taking; Socioeconomic Status (SES); Substance Use

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study, using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, examines the correlation among maternal substance abuse, depression, and criminality and their impact on child behavior problems, using a sample of African American and White mothers. Results show that maternal depression is the strongest predictor of child behavior problems. Race was significantly associated with income, a mother's age at the time of her first child's birth, and depression. Implications for practice include the need for practitioners to prioritize the treatment of maternal depression when working with children who have behavior problems and to not look at race as a cultural descriptor alone but rather to consider how it may be associated with other risk factors for child behavior problems. (Journal abstract)
Bibliography Citation
Smith-McKeever, T. Chedgzsey, Lydia Falconnier and Weihua Gao. "African American and White Mothers' Substance Abuse, Depression, and Criminality as Risk Factors for Child Behavior Problems." Families in Society: The Journal of Contemporary Social Services 92,1 (January 2011): 63-68.