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Title: The Effect of Incarceration on Midlife Health: A Life-Course Approach
Resulting in 1 citation.
1. Kim, Yujin
The Effect of Incarceration on Midlife Health: A Life-Course Approach
Population Research and Policy Review 34,6 (December 2015): 827-849.
Also: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11113-015-9365-x
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Health, Mental; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Incarceration/Jail; Life Course; Propensity Scores; Transition, Adulthood

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

A significant association between incarceration and health is well established, but whether this association depends on the timing of incarceration is not known. Men who experience incarceration during the transition to adulthood are more likely to have their educational attainment and transition into the work force disrupted relative to others who are never incarcerated and to those who are first incarcerated in adulthood. Thus, I investigate whether age at first incarceration conditions the relationship between incarceration and men’s health, including general and mental health in midlife. I also examine whether the disadvantaged socioeconomic status and health behavior of ex-inmates function as a main mechanism explaining the relationship between incarceration and health. Using propensity score–weighted regressions with data from the NLSY79. I find that men with a first incarceration during the transition to adulthood (at ages 18–24) are less likely to be in good self-reported general and mental health than otherwise similar men who have never been incarcerated. Results suggest that these negative health conditions among ex-inmates are explained mostly by socioeconomic status such as educational attainment and employment. On the other hand, men with an incarceration experience later in adulthood (at ages 25–40) are not less likely to be in good general and mental health compared to otherwise similar men who have never been incarcerated. Overall, the results from this study encourage a life course approach to understanding the relationship between incarceration and health.
Bibliography Citation
Kim, Yujin. "The Effect of Incarceration on Midlife Health: A Life-Course Approach." Population Research and Policy Review 34,6 (December 2015): 827-849.