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Author: Artis, Julie E.
Resulting in 3 citations.
1. Artis, Julie E.
Pavalko, Eliza K.
Explaining The Decline In Women's Household Labor: Individual Change and Cohort Differences
Journal of Marriage and Family 65,3 (August 2003): 746-762.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1741-3737.2003.00746.x/abstract
Cohort(s): Mature Women, Young Women
Publisher: National Council on Family Relations
Keyword(s): Behavior; Earnings, Wives; Housework/Housewives; Life Course; Marital Status; Women

Women's hours of housework have declined, but does this change represent shifts in the behavior of individuals or differences across cohorts? Using data from the National Longitudinal Surveys, individual and cohort change in housework are examined over a 13-year period. Responsibility for household tasks declined 10% from 1974-75 to 1987-88. For individual women, changes in housework are associated with life course shifts in time availability as well as with changes in gender attitudes and marital status, but are not related to changes in relative earnings. Cohort differences exist in responsibility for housework in the mid-1970s and they persist over the 13-year period. Overall, these findings suggest that aggregate changes in women's household labor reflect both individual change and cohort differences. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
Bibliography Citation
Artis, Julie E. and Eliza K. Pavalko. "Explaining The Decline In Women's Household Labor: Individual Change and Cohort Differences." Journal of Marriage and Family 65,3 (August 2003): 746-762.
2. Pavalko, Eliza K.
Artis, Julie E.
Caregiving and Paid Work in Women's Lives
Presented: New York, NY, American Sociological Association, August 1996
Cohort(s): Mature Women
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Disability; Employment; Employment, History; Labor Force Participation; Life Course; Retirement/Retirement Planning; Women; Work History; Work Hours

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Care of an ill or disabled family member or friend is disproportionately done by women, typically in late mid-life. Because this is also a time in the life course when women's labor force participation peaks, many women faced with caregiving demands have to decide how to balance them with their employment. Data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Mature Women are used to examined the relationship between employment & caring for an ill or disabled friend or relative over a 3-year period. It is found that the relationship between caregiving & employment is complex. Employed women are as likely as nonemployed women to start caregiving, but among the employed, work history is related to starting caregiving. Starting caregiving has a strong effecton reduction in employment hours, & these hours are not regained after women stop caregiving. Hour reductions among caregivers are not affected by the woman's attitudes toward her paid work, her proximity to retirement, or her prior employment history. (Copyright 1996, Sociological Abstracts, Inc., all rights reserved.)
Bibliography Citation
Pavalko, Eliza K. and Julie E. Artis. "Caregiving and Paid Work in Women's Lives." Presented: New York, NY, American Sociological Association, August 1996.
3. Pavalko, Eliza K.
Artis, Julie E.
Women's Caregiving and Paid Work: Causal Relationships in Late Midlife
Journals of Gerontology: Series B: Psychological Sciences and Social Sciences 52B,4 (July 1997): S170-S179.
Also: http://psychsocgerontology.oxfordjournals.org/content/52B/4/S170.abstract
Cohort(s): Mature Women
Publisher: Gerontological Society of America
Keyword(s): Employment; Health Care; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Part-Time Work

Used 1984 and 1987 data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Mature Women to examine the causal relationship between employment and caring for an ill or disabled friend or relative over the 3 yr. period, and to study the ways these women balanced their caregiving demands and their employment. A total of 3,147 women participated in both the 1984 and 1987 samples; 1,389 cases contained complete information on all independent variables: demographic data, caregiving, employment characteristics, and employment history. Results showed that employment did not affect whether or not women started caregiving, but that women who did start were more likely to reduce employment hours or to stop work.Thus, the causal relationship between employment and caregiving in late midlife is largely unidirectional, with women reducing work hours to meet caregiving demands. (PsycINFO Database Copyright 1998 American Psychological Assn, all rights reserved)
Bibliography Citation
Pavalko, Eliza K. and Julie E. Artis. "Women's Caregiving and Paid Work: Causal Relationships in Late Midlife." Journals of Gerontology: Series B: Psychological Sciences and Social Sciences 52B,4 (July 1997): S170-S179.