Search Results

Author: Gee, Gilbert C.
Resulting in 7 citations.
1. Gee, Gilbert C.
Pavalko, Eliza K.
Long, J. Scott
Age, Cohort and Perceived Age Discrimination: Using the Life Course to Assess Self-reported Age Discrimination
Social Forces 86,1 (September 2007): 265-290.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4495036
Cohort(s): Mature Women, Young Women
Publisher: University of North Carolina Press
Keyword(s): Age and Ageing; Discrimination, Age; Gender Differences; Life Course; Self-Reporting

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Self-reported discrimination is linked to diminished well-being, but the processes generating these reports remain poorly understood. Employing the life course perspective, this paper examines the correspondence between expected age preferences for workers and perceived age discrimination among a nationally representative sample of 7,225 working women, followed between 1972-1989. Analyses find that perceived age discrimination is high in the 20s, drops in the 30s and peaks in the 50s. This curvilinear pattern matches external reports of age preferences and is robust to a variety of controls and model specifications. Additionally, the primary driver of perceived age discrimination is age--not cohort or historical period. These findings suggest that perceived age discrimination is a useful indicator of population-level exposure to work-related age discrimination among women. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]

Copyright of Social Forces is the property of University of North Carolina Press and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts)

Longitudinal data from the Mature and Young Women's Cohorts of the National Longitudinal Surveys (NLS) are used to examine reports of discrimination between 1972 and 1988. Unlike previous cross-sectional studies of age discrimination, the NLS cohorts allow us to follow a nationally representative sample of U,S. women spanning several birth cohorts.

Bibliography Citation
Gee, Gilbert C., Eliza K. Pavalko and J. Scott Long. "Age, Cohort and Perceived Age Discrimination: Using the Life Course to Assess Self-reported Age Discrimination." Social Forces 86,1 (September 2007): 265-290.
2. Gee, Gilbert C.
Walsemann, Katrina Michelle
Does Health Predict the Reporting of Racial Discrimination or Do Reports of Discrimination Predict Health? Findings from The National Longitudinal Study Of Youth
Social Science and Medicine 68,9 (May 2009): 1676-1684.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0277953609000872
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Discrimination, Racial/Ethnic; Ethnic Studies; Health Factors; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Racial Studies; Well-Being

Racial discrimination may contribute to diminished well-being, possibly through stress and restricted economic advancement. Our study examines whether reports of racial discrimination predict health problems, and whether health problems predict the reporting of racial discrimination. Data come from years 1979 to 1983 of the US National Longitudinal Study of Youth, focusing on respondents of Black (n = 1851), Hispanic (n = 1170), White (n = 3450) and other (n = 1387) descent. Our analyses indicate that reports of racial discrimination in seeking employment predict health-related work limitations, although these limitations develop over time, and not immediately. We also find that reports of discrimination at two time-points appear more strongly related to health-related work limitations than reports at one time-point. A key finding is that these limitations do not predict the subsequent reporting of racial discrimination in seeking employment. These findings inform our knowledge of the temporal ordering of racial discrimination in seeking employment and health-related work conditions among young adults. The findings also indicate that future research should carefully attend to the patterns and timing of discrimination. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2009 APA, all rights reserved)
Bibliography Citation
Gee, Gilbert C. and Katrina Michelle Walsemann. "Does Health Predict the Reporting of Racial Discrimination or Do Reports of Discrimination Predict Health? Findings from The National Longitudinal Study Of Youth." Social Science and Medicine 68,9 (May 2009): 1676-1684.
3. Walsemann, Katrina Michelle
Ailshire, Jennifer A.
Gee, Gilbert C.
Student Loans and Racial Disparities in Self-reported Sleep Duration: Evidence from a Nationally Representative Sample of US Young Adults
Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health 70,1 (January 2016): 42-48.
Also: http://jech.bmj.com/content/70/1/42.abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: BMJ Publishing Group, Ltd. - British Medical Journal Publishing Group
Keyword(s): College Education; Debt/Borrowing; Racial Differences; Sleep; Student Loans

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Background: Student loans are the second largest source of personal debt in the USA and may represent an important source of financial strain for many young adults. Little attention has been paid to whether debt is associated with sleep duration, an important health-promoting behaviour. We determine if student loans are associated with sleep duration. Since black young adults are more likely to have student debt and sleep less, we also consider whether this association varies by race.

Methods: Data come from the US National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997. The main analytic sample includes 4714 respondents who were ever enrolled in college and who reported on sleep duration in 2010. Most respondents had completed their college education by 2010, when respondents were 25 to 31 years old. Multivariable linear regression models assessed the cross-sectional association between student loans accumulated over the course of college and sleep duration in 2010, as well as between student debt at age 25 and sleep duration in 2010.

Results: Black young adults with greater amounts of student loans or more student debt reported shorter sleep duration, controlling for occupation, hours worked, household income, parental net worth, marital status, number of children in the household and other sociodemographic and health indicators. There was no association between student loans or debt with sleep for white or latino adults and other racial/ethnic groups.

Conclusions: Student loans may contribute to racial inequities in sleep duration. Our findings also suggest that the student debt crisis may have important implications for individuals’ sleep, specifically and public health, more broadly.

Bibliography Citation
Walsemann, Katrina Michelle, Jennifer A. Ailshire and Gilbert C. Gee. "Student Loans and Racial Disparities in Self-reported Sleep Duration: Evidence from a Nationally Representative Sample of US Young Adults ." Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health 70,1 (January 2016): 42-48.
4. Walsemann, Katrina Michelle
Gee, Gilbert C.
Gentile, Danielle
Sick of Our Loans: Student Borrowing and the Health of U.S. Young Adults
Presented: Boston MA, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, May 2014
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): College Education; Debt/Borrowing; Financial Assistance; Health, Mental; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Student Loans; Wealth

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

We investigated how college loans are related to health during early adulthood, whether this relationship is stronger among those with less parental wealth or without a college degree, and if this relationship varied by type of college attended (e.g. 2-year versus 4-year). We analyzed data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997, a nationally representative sample of young adults, restricting our sample to persons who ever attended college (n=4,643). Multivariate regression tested the association between college loans and self-rated health and psychological functioning in 2010, adjusting for a robust set of socio-demographic indicators. Student loans were associated with poorer self-rated health and psychological functioning. This association varied by level of parental wealth, but not degree attainment or type of college attended. Our study raises provocative questions for further research regarding student loan debt and the possible spillover effects on other life circumstances, such as occupational trajectories and health inequities.
Bibliography Citation
Walsemann, Katrina Michelle, Gilbert C. Gee and Danielle Gentile. "Sick of Our Loans: Student Borrowing and the Health of U.S. Young Adults." Presented: Boston MA, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, May 2014.
5. Walsemann, Katrina Michelle
Gee, Gilbert C.
Gentile, Danielle
Sick of Our Loans: Student Borrowing and the Mental Health of Young Adults in the United States
Social Science and Medicine 124 (January 2015): 85-93.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0277953614007503
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): College Enrollment; Debt/Borrowing; Educational Attainment; Financial Assistance; Health, Mental; Human Capital; Modeling, Fixed Effects; Student Loans

Student loans are increasingly important and commonplace, especially among recent cohorts of young adults in the United States. These loans facilitate the acquisition of human capital in the form of education, but may also lead to stress and worries related to repayment. This study investigated two questions: 1) what is the association between the cumulative amount of student loans borrowed over the course of schooling and psychological functioning when individuals are 25-31 years old; and 2) what is the association between annual student loan borrowing and psychological functioning among currently enrolled college students? We also examined whether these relationships varied by parental wealth, college enrollment history (e.g. 2-year versus 4-year college), and educational attainment (for cumulative student loans only). We analyzed data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 (NLSY97), a nationally representative sample of young adults in the United States. Analyses employed multivariate linear regression and within-person fixed-effects models. Student loans were associated with poorer psychological functioning, adjusting for covariates, in both the multivariate linear regression and the within-person fixed effects models. This association varied by level of parental wealth in the multivariate linear regression models only, and did not vary by college enrollment history or educational attainment. The present findings raise novel questions for further research regarding student loan debt and the possible spillover effects on other life circumstances, such as occupational trajectories and health inequities. The study of student loans is even more timely and significant given the ongoing rise in the costs of higher education.
Bibliography Citation
Walsemann, Katrina Michelle, Gilbert C. Gee and Danielle Gentile. "Sick of Our Loans: Student Borrowing and the Mental Health of Young Adults in the United States." Social Science and Medicine 124 (January 2015): 85-93.
6. Walsemann, Katrina Michelle
Gee, Gilbert C.
Geronimus, Arline T.
Ethnic Differences in Trajectories of Depressive Symptoms: Disadvantage in Family Background, High School Experiences, and Adult Characteristics
Journal of Health and Social Behavior 50,1 (March 2009): 82-98.
Also: http://hsb.sagepub.com/content/50/1/82.abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): CESD (Depression Scale); Depression (see also CESD); Ethnic Groups/Ethnicity; Health, Mental; Life Course; Modeling, Random Effects; Racial Differences; Variables, Independent - Covariate

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Although research investigating ethnic differences in mental health has increased in recent years, we know relatively little about how mental health trajectories vary across ethnic groups. Do these differences occur at certain ages but not others? We investigate ethnic variation in trajectories of depressive symptoms, and we examine the extent to which disadvantages in family background, high school experiences, and adult characteristics explain these differences. Employing random-coefficient modeling using the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, we find that blacks and Hispanics experience higher symptom levels in early adulthood in comparison to whites, but equivalent levels by middle age. Ethnic differences remained in early adulthood after including all covariates, but those differences were eliminated by middle age for Hispanics after controlling for demographics only, and for blacks after accounting for the age-varying relationship between income and depressive symptoms. These results highlight the importance of integrating a life course perspective when investigating ethnic variations in mental health. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]

Copyright of Journal of Health & Social Behavior is the property of American Sociological Association and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts)

Bibliography Citation
Walsemann, Katrina Michelle, Gilbert C. Gee and Arline T. Geronimus. "Ethnic Differences in Trajectories of Depressive Symptoms: Disadvantage in Family Background, High School Experiences, and Adult Characteristics." Journal of Health and Social Behavior 50,1 (March 2009): 82-98.
7. Walsemann, Katrina Michelle
Geronimus, Arline T.
Gee, Gilbert C.
Accumulating Disadvantage over the Life Course: Evidence from a Longitudinal Study Investigating the Relationship Between Educational Advantage in Youth and Health in Middle Age
Research on Aging 30,2 (March 2008): 169-199.
Also: http://roa.sagepub.com/content/30/2/169.abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Education; Educational Attainment; Ethnic Differences; Health Care; Life Course; Racial Differences

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Recent studies suggest the importance of examining cumulative risk or advantage as potential predictors of health over the life course. Researchers investigating the cumulative health effects of education, however, have mainly conceptualized education in years or degrees, often disregarding educational quality and access to educational opportunities that may place individuals on divergent academic trajectories. We investigate whether educational advantages in youth are associated with an individual's health trajectory. We develop a novel index of educational advantage and employ random-intercept modeling using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth. A widening health disparity was found in adulthood between respondents with greater and those with fewer educational advantages in youth. Furthermore, among respondents with few educational advantages, Blacks experience a greater health burden as they age compared to Whites and Hispanics. These results suggest that differential access to educational advantages during youth may contribute to persisting health disparities in adulthood. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]

Copyright of Research on Aging is the property of Sage Publications Inc. and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts)

Bibliography Citation
Walsemann, Katrina Michelle, Arline T. Geronimus and Gilbert C. Gee. "Accumulating Disadvantage over the Life Course: Evidence from a Longitudinal Study Investigating the Relationship Between Educational Advantage in Youth and Health in Middle Age." Research on Aging 30,2 (March 2008): 169-199.