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Author: Gershenson, Seth
Resulting in 2 citations.
1. Gershenson, Seth
Holt, Stephen B.
Wang, Rui
The Impact of Consequential Accountability Policies on Teachers' Mental Health
Presented: Washington DC, Association for Public Policy Analysis and Management (APPAM) Annual Fall Research Conference, November 2018
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY97
Publisher: Association for Public Policy Analysis and Management (APPAM)
Keyword(s): Geocoded Data; Health, Mental; Occupations; State-Level Data/Policy; Teachers/Faculty

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Teachers' mental health is an important, understudied teacher characteristic as it likely affects teacher effectiveness, engagement, and retention in the profession. In this paper, we study the impacts of accountability policies on K-12 teachers' mental health using nationally representative longitudinal survey data. We do so in two ways. First, we exploit state-level variation in the adoption of high-stakes accountability policies in the 1990s. Specifically, we follow Hanushek and Raymond (2005) in using a difference-in-differences (DD) strategy that compares the mental health of teachers in states that did adopt a high-stakes accountability policy to those that did not, before and after the policies were adopted. We also leverage a triple-difference (DDD) design that uses non-teachers in treatment and control states as an additional control group. Second, we exploit the enactment of No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) in 2001, which required states to adopt stringent accountability policies. The NCLB Act primarily affected states that had lax pre-existing accountability policies in place. Here, we implement the DD strategy developed by Dee and Jacob (2011) to examine the causal impacts of NCLB on teachers' mental health by considering teachers in states with pre-existing NCLB-type accountability policies as the control group. Both analyses use data from the nationally representative National Longitudinal Study of Youth (NLSY) 1979 and 1997 cohorts, which provides various measures of individuals' mental health from teenage years through adulthood. This data has previously been used to study teacher labor markets, as it includes occupation codes, and the NLSY surveys also include demographics and socioeconomic information on both teachers and non-teachers, prior to and after entering the workforce. By tracking an individual's mental health over a long period, this paper identifies the accountability's effects on teachers' mental health and provides policy implications for future education policy and suggestions on how to better support teachers.
Bibliography Citation
Gershenson, Seth, Stephen B. Holt and Rui Wang. "The Impact of Consequential Accountability Policies on Teachers' Mental Health." Presented: Washington DC, Association for Public Policy Analysis and Management (APPAM) Annual Fall Research Conference, November 2018.
2. Hardy, Bradley L.
Gershenson, Seth
Parental Involvement, Summer Activities, and the Intergenerational Transmission of Educational Attainment
Presented: New Orleans LA, Southern Economic Association Annual Meeting, October 2012. Updated May 2013.
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Southern Economic Association
Keyword(s): Armed Forces Qualifications Test (AFQT); Child Self-Administered Supplement (CSAS); Children, Academic Development; Educational Attainment; Extracurricular Activities/Sports; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission; Mobility, Economic; Mothers, Education; Parent-School involvement; Parental Influences

Several authors have speculated that differences in parental involvement across parents' educational attainment may influence the intergenerational transmission of education; however, these literatures have yet to be formally integrated. We begin to fill this gap in the literature by estimating augmented intergenerational mobility models that include measures of parental involvement and children's participation in "school like" summer activities using rich data from the Child and Young Adult Supplement to the National Longitudinal Survey (NLSY79). Adding parental involvement and summer activity measures to the vector of standard socioeconomic controls does not change the estimated intergenerational transmission of education coefficient. Participation in summer activities significantly influences children's educational attainment, and the transmission of education operates at least partially through highly-educated mothers facilitating their children's participation in stimulating summer activities.
Bibliography Citation
Hardy, Bradley L. and Seth Gershenson. "Parental Involvement, Summer Activities, and the Intergenerational Transmission of Educational Attainment." Presented: New Orleans LA, Southern Economic Association Annual Meeting, October 2012. Updated May 2013.