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Author: Gottlieb, Aaron
Resulting in 7 citations.
1. Gottlieb, Aaron
Beyond Parental Incarceration: The Effects of Household Incarceration on the Intergenerational Transmission of Disadvantage through Family Structure
Presented: Boston MA, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, May 2014
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Childbearing, Premarital/Nonmarital; Family Structure; Heterogeneity; Household Influences; Incarceration/Jail

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Two of the most pronounced social trends in the United States over the last 40 years are the increase in childbearing outside of marriage and the increase in incarceration. Yet, no research has explored whether having a household member incarcerated influences a child’s risk of growing up to have a premarital birth. Using data on the children of mothers in the NLSY79, I find that having a household member incarcerated between ages 10 to 14 increases a child’s the risk of growing up to have a premarital first birth by approximately 40%. The findings also show heterogeneity in the consequences of household incarceration, with paternal incarceration and extended household incarceration being particularly important risk factors for having a premarital first birth. These findings suggest that research exclusively emphasizing the consequences of parental incarceration has likely underestimated the consequences of the prison boom.
Bibliography Citation
Gottlieb, Aaron. "Beyond Parental Incarceration: The Effects of Household Incarceration on the Intergenerational Transmission of Disadvantage through Family Structure." Presented: Boston MA, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, May 2014.
2. Gottlieb, Aaron
Beyond Parental Incarceration: The Effects of Household Incarceration on the Risk of Premarital First Birth
Presented: San Francisco CA, American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, August 2014
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Adolescent Behavior; Childbearing, Premarital/Nonmarital; Family Structure; Heterogeneity; Household Influences; Incarceration/Jail

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Two of the most pronounced social trends in the United States over the last 40 years are the increase in childbearing outside of marriage and the increase in incarceration. Yet, no research has explored whether having a household member incarcerated during childhood influences a child's risk of having a premarital birth. Using data on the children of mothers interviewed in the NLSY79, I find that having a household member incarcerated between ages 10 to 14 increases a child's risk of growing up to have a premarital first birth by approximately 40% in both covariate adjustment and propensity score matching approaches. The findings also show that both the incarceration of immediate and extended family household members are important risk factors for having a premarital first birth. Taken together, these findings suggest that research exclusively emphasizing the consequences of parental incarceration has likely underestimated the consequences of the prison boom. One important way that household incarceration transmits disadvantage is by impacting family structure across generations.
Bibliography Citation
Gottlieb, Aaron. "Beyond Parental Incarceration: The Effects of Household Incarceration on the Risk of Premarital First Birth." Presented: San Francisco CA, American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, August 2014.
3. Gottlieb, Aaron
Household Incarceration in Early Adolescence and Risk of Premarital First Birth
Children and Youth Services Review 61 (February 2016): 126-134.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0190740915301353
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Childbearing, Premarital/Nonmarital; First Birth; Household Influences; Incarceration/Jail

In the second half of the 20th century, the United States experienced a massive increase in incarceration. In response to this growth, a burgeoning scholarship has sought to explore the collateral consequences of incarceration for young children. However, this scholarship has less frequently explored the impact of incarceration on long-term outcomes, how incarceration experienced in periods other than early childhood impacts children, and whether the incarceration of family members other than parents has negative implications for children. Using data from the children of the mothers in the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, I explore whether household incarceration experienced in early adolescence is associated with a child's risk of growing up to have a premarital first birth. The results suggest that, even after including a rich set of covariates, children who experience household incarceration in early adolescence are at greater risk of having a premarital first birth, particularly when the father or an external household member is incarcerated.
Bibliography Citation
Gottlieb, Aaron. "Household Incarceration in Early Adolescence and Risk of Premarital First Birth." Children and Youth Services Review 61 (February 2016): 126-134.
4. Gottlieb, Aaron
Mass Incarceration in the United States: New Evidence on Implications and Ways Forward
Ph.D. Dissertation, Department of Sociology, Princeton University, 2016
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: ProQuest Dissertations & Theses (PQDT)
Keyword(s): Birth Outcomes; Childhood Adversity/Trauma; First Birth; Incarceration/Jail; Parental Influences

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Currently, the U.S. has the highest incarceration rate of all large countries in the world. Beginning in the 1970s, the U.S. criminal justice system underwent a dramatic transformation in its sentencing practices that is largely responsible for today's historic levels of incarceration. In this dissertation, I provide evidence on two questions: 1) What are the implications of the growth in incarceration; and 2) Can rhetoric be used to increase public support for rolling back U.S. incarceration rates? The first two empirical chapters of this dissertation provide evidence addressing the first question. In the first empirical chapter, I use data from 15 advanced democratic countries from 1971-2010 to explore whether cross-national variation in incarceration rates contributes to cross-national variation in relative poverty rates. The results suggest that there is no average association, but this obscures the fact the association is contingent on a country's level of welfare state generosity and female employment. In the second empirical chapter, I explore whether U.S children who experience the incarceration of household members are at greater risk of experiencing a premarital first birth. The results suggest that experiencing household incarceration in early adolescence is associated with an increase in a child's risk of growing up to have a premarital first birth, particularly when a father or extended household member is incarcerated.
Bibliography Citation
Gottlieb, Aaron. Mass Incarceration in the United States: New Evidence on Implications and Ways Forward. Ph.D. Dissertation, Department of Sociology, Princeton University, 2016.
5. Gottlieb, Aaron
Sugie, Naomi
Marriage, Cohabitation and Criminal Offending among Young Adults
Presented: New Orleans LA, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, April 2013
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Cohabitation; Crime; Delinquency/Gang Activity; Drug Use; Family Structure; Marriage

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Over the last 40 years, one of the most pronounced changes in the family is the increase in cohabitation and reduction in marriage. Despite the changing trends in the family, contemporary criminological theories have rarely considered the role of cohabitation in offending, continuing to emphasize the protective role of marriage. In this paper, we use data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 to examine the relationship between marriage, cohabitation, and offending among a sample of young adult men and women. We find that cohabitation protects against deviant behavior, although to a lesser degree than marriage. Partner characteristics appear to mediate the association for both marriage and cohabitation; partnership characteristics, on the other hand, appear to mediate the association for cohabitation to a much greater degree than for marriage.
Bibliography Citation
Gottlieb, Aaron and Naomi Sugie. "Marriage, Cohabitation and Criminal Offending among Young Adults." Presented: New Orleans LA, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, April 2013.
6. Gottlieb, Aaron
Sugie, Naomi
Marriage, Cohabitation, and Crime: Differentiating Associations by Partnership Stage
Justice Quarterly published online (11 April 2018): DOI: 10.1080/07418825.2018.1445275.
Also: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/07418825.2018.1445275
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences
Keyword(s): Cohabitation; Crime; Marital Status; Marriage

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

A wealth of scholarship generally finds that marriage protects against crime, but there is less consistent evidence for cohabitation. In this article, we contribute to scholarship on marriage and put forward new evidence about cohabitation by examining marital and cohabiting partnerships as transitions with distinct stages of entry, stability, and dissolution. We use within-person change models with contemporary data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 to analyze these stages for the full sample and separately for men and women. The findings show differential protective associations of marriage and cohabitation depending on the stage of the partnership. Both recently formed cohabiting partnerships and stable cohabiting partnerships are associated with reductions in the level of offending, although to a lesser degree than marital relationships. Cohabiting partnerships that are stable, in that they have lasted at least a year, are associated with larger decreases in offending, particularly among women.
Bibliography Citation
Gottlieb, Aaron and Naomi Sugie. "Marriage, Cohabitation, and Crime: Differentiating Associations by Partnership Stage." Justice Quarterly published online (11 April 2018): DOI: 10.1080/07418825.2018.1445275.
7. Grigoryeva, Angelina
Gottlieb, Aaron
Adult Child Imprisonment and Parent's Well-Being
Presented: Washington DC, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, March-April 2016
Cohort(s): NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Incarceration/Jail; Parental Influences

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Inspired by the American prison boom, extensive research has focused on the risk of incarceration, carceral inequalities, and its consequences. Initially focused on people who experienced incarceration directly, more recently researchers explored how incarceration alters the lives of family members, including spouses/partners and children. However, researchers have paid little attention to how incarceration reshapes the social experience of parenthood and aging for parents of adult children who experience incarceration. Using the NLSY79 child and young adult survey, this study extends existing research in two primary ways. First, using life-table methods, we provide the first empirical estimates of the risk of experiencing adult child imprisonment and explore how it varies by parent's race and education. Second, we examine how adult child's incarceration is associated with parent's mental, physical, and economic well-being.
Bibliography Citation
Grigoryeva, Angelina and Aaron Gottlieb. "Adult Child Imprisonment and Parent's Well-Being." Presented: Washington DC, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, March-April 2016.