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Author: Hendrix, Joshua A.
Resulting in 4 citations.
1. Hendrix, Joshua A.
Nonstandard Work among Young Adults: Pathways into Poor Psychological Functioning
Presented: New York NY, American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, August 2013
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Depression (see also CESD); Health, Mental; Life Satisfaction; Psychological Effects; Relationship Conflict; Shift Workers; Sleep; Work Hours

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Individuals who work during nonstandard hours are at risk for psychological problems, yet little is known about the mechanisms that explain these links, and whether pathways are contingent on gender and family roles. I address these issues with a nationally representative sample of employed men and woman in their mid-to-late twenties (n=4,300). I investigate whether life dissatisfaction, job dissatisfaction, and sleep hours are mechanisms for explaining associations between nonstandard work hours and poor psychological functioning for single respondents, and whether these processes in addition to intimate-relationship conflict can explain associations for partnered respondents. Results indicate a number of adverse consequences of working nonstandard schedules. Most notably, evening work hours are associated with psychological functioning, although pathways are gender-specific. The link between evening work hours and poor psychological functioning operates through job dissatisfaction for partnered men and through life dissatisfaction for partnered women. Work schedules are not directly associated with psychological functioning for single respondents, although a number of indirect pathways are detected. Implications of findings are discussed.
Bibliography Citation
Hendrix, Joshua A. "Nonstandard Work among Young Adults: Pathways into Poor Psychological Functioning." Presented: New York NY, American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, August 2013.
2. Hendrix, Joshua A.
Angels and Loners: An Examination of Abstainer Subtypes
Deviant Behavior 37,12 (2016): 1361-1379.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/01639625.2016.1177391
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
Keyword(s): Adolescent Behavior; Modeling, Latent Class Analysis/Latent Transition Analysis

Scholars speculate that there may be both prosocial and antisocial modes of abstention; however, few attempts have been made to examine this idea empirically. Using a pooled sample from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979, group-based trajectory analysis is presented to identify adolescents who abstain from marijuana, vandalism, violence, and theft during their teenage years, and latent class analysis is used to examine within-group heterogeneity among abstainers. A subset of abstainers report weak peer integration, psycho-emotional instability, worse academic performance, and more conflict with their parents. Implications of findings are discussed.
Bibliography Citation
Hendrix, Joshua A. "Angels and Loners: An Examination of Abstainer Subtypes." Deviant Behavior 37,12 (2016): 1361-1379.
3. Hendrix, Joshua A.
Angels and Loners: An Examination of Abstention Processes and Abstainer Heterogeneity
Ph.D. Dissertation, North Carolina State University, 2014
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: ProQuest Dissertations & Theses (PQDT)
Keyword(s): Adolescent Behavior; Age at Menarche; Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Body Mass Index (BMI); Child Self-Administered Supplement (CSAS); Chores (see Housework); Delinquency/Gang Activity; Drug Use; Height; Modeling, Latent Class Analysis/Latent Transition Analysis; Neighborhood Effects; Parent-Child Relationship/Closeness; Parenting Skills/Styles; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading); Peers/Peer influence/Peer relations; Risk-Taking; Volunteer Work; Work Experience

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Although most adolescents do not frequently engage in delinquency, the majority do participate in criminal behavior at some point during their formative years. What accounts for the small minority who abstain entirely? Moffitt's (1993) life-course persistent and adolescent-limited model of offending suggests that abstention can be a function of a smaller-than-normal maturity gap, structural barriers to delinquency learning opportunities, atypical personal characteristics, or some combination of these. Although some empirical attention has been given to the atypical personal traits proposition, no research to date has examined Moffitt's abstention thesis in its entirety. A complete test requires an examination of the ways in which abstainers differ from non-abstainers, as well as from one another. Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979: Children and Young Adults (n=5,003), latent trajectory analysis is presented to produce delinquency taxonomies, to evaluate key theoretical predictors of abstention, and to elaborate on the distinguishing characteristics between abstaining and non-abstaining adolescents. Following this, latent class analysis is used to examine within-group heterogeneity, highlighting unique variation in developmental traits among abstaining youths. Models predicting the odds of taxonomy membership indicate some support for each of Moffitt's abstention propositions. Additionally, results from latent class analysis confirm that not all abstainers are alike and support the notion that there are both prosocial and antisocial modes of abstention. These findings may help to clarify inconsistent findings from past studies and they are potentially informative for understanding the early precursors to delayed criminal careers.
Bibliography Citation
Hendrix, Joshua A. Angels and Loners: An Examination of Abstention Processes and Abstainer Heterogeneity. Ph.D. Dissertation, North Carolina State University, 2014.
4. Hendrix, Joshua A.
Parcel, Toby L.
Parental Nonstandard Work, Family Processes, and Delinquency During Adolescence
Journal of Family Issues 35,10 (August 2014): 1363-1393.
Also: http://jfi.sagepub.com/content/35/10/1363.abstract
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Child Self-Administered Supplement (CSAS); Delinquency/Gang Activity; Parent-Child Relationship/Closeness; Parents, Single; Shift Workers; Work Hours

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Although past research suggests that nonstandard parental work arrangements have negative implications for children, researchers typically assess the effects of maternal and paternal work schedules independently, and studies among older adolescents are rare. Combining insights from family sociology and criminology, we evaluate the effects of household work arrangements on family processes and delinquency among a national sample of 10- to 17-year-old children. We find that children from households where both parents work nonstandard hours report weaker levels of family bonding, which in turn is associated with greater delinquency. Children from single-mother households in which the mother works evening or night shifts report weaker levels of parent–child closeness and family bonding, which fully mediate the association with greater delinquency. We also find that select maternal nonstandard schedules in conjunction with paternal standard schedules are associated with lower delinquency among children. We derive implications for parental work schedules in households with adolescents.
Bibliography Citation
Hendrix, Joshua A. and Toby L. Parcel. "Parental Nonstandard Work, Family Processes, and Delinquency During Adolescence." Journal of Family Issues 35,10 (August 2014): 1363-1393.