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Author: Hollister, Matissa
Resulting in 4 citations.
1. Hollister, Matissa
Employer and Occupational Instability in Two Cohorts of the National Longitudinal Surveys
The Sociological Quarterly 53,2 (Spring 2012): 238-263.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1533-8525.2012.01233.x/abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79, Young Men, Young Women
Publisher: Wiley Online
Keyword(s): Employment, History; Gender Differences; Labor Force Participation; Occupational Choice; Occupations; Wages

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Previous research on trends in employer and occupational stability found evidence of declines in stability among men but contradictory results for women. I provide new insights into these patterns by simultaneously analyzing employer and occupation changes, and by examining a more detailed set of transition types. I show that the patterns for women are quite similar to those of men but are masked by declines in transitions from employment to out of the labor force. Finally, I find that while some of the changes may bring increased opportunities for wage increases, they bring even greater risks of wage losses.
Bibliography Citation
Hollister, Matissa. "Employer and Occupational Instability in Two Cohorts of the National Longitudinal Surveys." The Sociological Quarterly 53,2 (Spring 2012): 238-263.
2. Hollister, Matissa
Is Optimal Matching Suboptimal?
Sociological Methods and Research 38,2 (November 2009): 235-264.
Also: http://smr.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/38/2/235
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Career Patterns; Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission; Job Patterns; Mobility, Job; Occupational Status; Occupations; Work Histories

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Optimal matching (OM) is a method for measuring the similarity between pairs of sequences (e.g., work histories). This article discusses two problems with optimal matching. First, the author identifies a flaw in OM "indel costs" and proposes a solution to this flaw. Second, the author discusses the need for benchmarks to measure the added value of OM and to test competing versions. To that end, the author conducts an empirical test of traditional OM, the alternative localized OM, and sequence comparison. The test documents the problem with traditional OM and shows that it is solved by localized OM. The test also demonstrates the value of OM and sequence comparison in examining occupational sequences; both methods capture variation beyond traditional human capital and status attainment measures, although the marginal improvements of OM over sequence comparison may not justify its computational complexity. These results point to the need for more systematic approaches to sequence analysis methods.
Bibliography Citation
Hollister, Matissa. "Is Optimal Matching Suboptimal?" Sociological Methods and Research 38,2 (November 2009): 235-264.
3. Hollister, Matissa
Rise in Occupation Changing Rates in the United States 1979-2007: Evidence from Three National Data Sources
Working Paper, Department of Sociology Dartmouth College, 2010.
Also: http://www.dartmouth.edu/~socy/pdfs/HollisterOccupationChange.pdf
Cohort(s): NLSY79, Young Men, Young Women
Publisher: Department of Sociology, Dartmouth College
Keyword(s): Current Population Survey (CPS) / CPS-Fertility Supplement; Educational Attainment; Mobility, Economic; Mobility, Job; Mobility, Labor Market; Mobility, Occupational; Occupational Choice; Occupations; Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Many people see job instability as a fundamental element of the New Economy. There is evidence that workers are changing employers more often than in the past. These findings raise questions regarding the role of occupations in the New Economy. On one hand, the Silicon Valley model of employment, often seen as the future of work, involves changing employers but not occupations. On the other hand, the New Economy may be leading to a more unpredictable labor market along all dimensions. Using data from the National Longitudinal Surveys, the Current Population Survey, and the Panel Study of Income Dynamics, this study finds consistent evidence that rates of occupation changing have increased over time. This trend persists even after controlling for changes in the demographic and occupational composition of the labor force. The increase in occupation changing was not confined to shifts between jobs with similar characteristics, but instead involved changes across most dimensions of occupational skill and working conditions. The increase in occupation changing was, however, particularly large among less-educated workers. Finally, the trends involve increases in both upward and downward occupational moves. The results, therefore, suggest a New Economy with widespread instability and particular disadvantages for less skilled workers.
Bibliography Citation
Hollister, Matissa. "Rise in Occupation Changing Rates in the United States 1979-2007: Evidence from Three National Data Sources." Working Paper, Department of Sociology Dartmouth College, 2010.
4. Hollister, Matissa
Why Didn't the Joneses Keep Up? The Unusual Occupational Outcomes of the Late Baby Boomers and the Future of Professional Work
Working Paper, Department of Sociology Dartmouth College, 2010.
Also: http://www.dartmouth.edu/~socy/pdfs/HollisterGenJones.pdf
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Department of Sociology, Dartmouth College
Keyword(s): Data Analysis; Labor Force Participation; Labor Market Outcomes; Methods/Methodology; Occupational Choice; Occupational Investment; Occupations; Unemployment; Unemployment Duration

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Overall, professional work has increased steadily since 1950. This paper, however, identifies considerable cohort variation hiding behind this broad trend. In particular, I show that "Generation Jones" (born 1955-1964) entered professional occupations at a particularly low rate. Furthermore, Generation X (born 1965-1974), returned to higher rates of professional work but the cohort was so small that professional workers in Generation X as a share of the total labor force fell to even lower levels. I discuss the implications of these results for understanding the causes of cohort variation, the nature of professional occupations, and the future of professional work.
Bibliography Citation
Hollister, Matissa. "Why Didn't the Joneses Keep Up? The Unusual Occupational Outcomes of the Late Baby Boomers and the Future of Professional Work." Working Paper, Department of Sociology Dartmouth College, 2010.