Search Results

Author: Mandara, Jelani
Resulting in 11 citations.
1. Larzelere, Robert E.
Cox, Ronald B. Jr.
Danelia, Ketevan
Mandara, Jelani
Do Child Outcomes of All Disciplinary Enforcements Vary By Ethnicity?
Presented: Little Rock, AR, Annual Conference of the National Council on Family Relations, November 2008
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: National Council on Family Relations
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Discipline; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Parents, Behavior; Punishment, Corporal

The association of spanking with externalizing behavior problems varies by ethnicity in many studies comparing Black and White Americans. This study investigates whether the outcomes of other disciplinary enforcements also varies by ethnicity in 7- to 11-year-olds. Ethnic interactions were found for spanking, privilege removal, grounding, and, marginally, for sending children to their room. The significant simple effects were never detrimental for Hispanics or Blacks and never beneficial for Whites. At these ages, privilege removal appeared effective except for Whites and grounding was effective for Hispanics. Spanking and sending children to their room showed opposite effects for Blacks and Whites. This study uses data from two waves (1996 & 1998) of the well-known National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY). The children were 7.5 to 11.4 years olds in 1996 and included 53% boys. The NLSY oversampled ethnic minorities, yielding 22% Hispanic-Americans (HAs), 27% African-Americans (AAs), and 51% European-Americans (EAs). The sample size was 868 for most analyses after dropping cases with missing data.
Bibliography Citation
Larzelere, Robert E., Ronald B. Jr. Cox, Ketevan Danelia and Jelani Mandara. "Do Child Outcomes of All Disciplinary Enforcements Vary By Ethnicity?." Presented: Little Rock, AR, Annual Conference of the National Council on Family Relations, November 2008.
2. Mandara, Jelani
An Empirically Derived Parenting Typology
Working Paper, Program in Human Development and Social Policy, Northwestern University, 2010
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Northwestern University
Keyword(s): Armed Forces Qualifications Test (AFQT); Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Child Self-Administered Supplement (CSAS); Depression (see also CESD); Discipline; Family Income; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Parent-Child Interaction; Parenting Skills/Styles; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The purpose of this study was to uncover dispositional types of parents among 4754 adolescents and their parents from the NLSY-79. Cluster analytic methods were used and five qualitatively different parenting types were uncovered. Moreover, the profiles and effects of parenting type were consistent for African, European, and Hispanic Americans. Authoritative and strict authoritative parents had much higher SES, achievement and mental health than the permissive, authoritarian or neglectful parents. Even after adjusting for the background factors, those with authoritative parents had higher achievement, fewer depressive symptoms and less externalizing problems for each ethnic group. However, European American youth were twice as likely as Hispanic and African American youth to have authoritative parents. It was concluded that the traditional conception of authoritative parenting may be optimal for all American ethnic groups, even if it is not culturally normative for some. A stricter version of authoritative parenting was also adequate.
Bibliography Citation
Mandara, Jelani. "An Empirically Derived Parenting Typology." Working Paper, Program in Human Development and Social Policy, Northwestern University, 2010.
3. Mandara, Jelani
Economic Resources and Achievement Oriented Parenting Explain Most Ethnic Disparities in Child and Adolescent Achievement
Presentation: Montreal QC, Canada: Invited Address, SRCD Biennial Meeting, March 31 - April 2, 2011.
Also: http://www.srcd.org/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=495
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD)
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Birth Order; Ethnic Differences; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Modeling, Structural Equation; Parenting Skills/Styles; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading); Siblings; Sociability/Socialization/Social Interaction

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

In this talk, Jelani Mandara will argue that ethnic differences in achievement are completely social in origin. He will argue that the significant differences in SES of past generations led to ethnic differences in the use of achievement oriented parenting strategies. Such parenting strategies are fundamental to the development of certain cognitive skills and achievement motivation, which, along with school factors, account for current ethnic disparities in achievement. Using SEM with latent variables to test the tenets of this model with data from the NLSY79, NLSY97 and smaller datasets, Dr. Mandara will show that once SES and parenting are appropriately measured, the family factors explain no less than 90% of the achievement gap in each dataset. He also will show that these achievement disparities are somewhat different by gender, birth order, and region of the country. Dr. Mandara will conclude by discussing the importance of effective parent training interventions and other policy recommendations.
Bibliography Citation
Mandara, Jelani. "Economic Resources and Achievement Oriented Parenting Explain Most Ethnic Disparities in Child and Adolescent Achievement." Presentation: Montreal QC, Canada: Invited Address, SRCD Biennial Meeting, March 31 - April 2, 2011.
4. Mandara, Jelani
How Socialization Contributes to Gender Disparities in Health and Achievement
Presented: Washington DC: Innovative Research to Reduce Addiction, Trauma and Related Co-Morbidities, A Research Development & Technical Assistance Conference (NIDA, NICHD), November 1-2, 2010.
Also: http://www.acclaroresearch.com/spo/healthdisparities/pdf/Mandara.pdf
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: National Institute of Child Health and Human Development
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Birth Order; Child Self-Administered Supplement (CSAS); Ethnic Differences; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Parent-Child Interaction; Parenting Skills/Styles; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading); Siblings; Sociability/Socialization/Social Interaction

See above link: 44 slides.
Bibliography Citation
Mandara, Jelani. "How Socialization Contributes to Gender Disparities in Health and Achievement." Presented: Washington DC: Innovative Research to Reduce Addiction, Trauma and Related Co-Morbidities, A Research Development & Technical Assistance Conference (NIDA, NICHD), November 1-2, 2010.
5. Mandara, Jelani
The Effects of Parenting Styles on Adolescent Achievement Test Scores: Ethnic and Gender Differences (And Similarities)
Working Paper, School of Education and Social Policy, Northwestern University, 2006
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: School of Education and Social Policy, Northwestern University
Keyword(s): Armed Forces Qualifications Test (AFQT); Birth Order; Hispanics; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Parent-Child Interaction; Parenting Skills/Styles; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading); Racial Differences; Testing Conditions; Tests and Testing

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Objective. The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of parenting styles on Black, White, and Hispanic adolescents achievement test scores.

Design. A total of 3290 adolescents and their mothers from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth were assessed on various measures of parenting, math and reading achievement, SES, cognitive stimulation, and child motivation and health. The study also used different measures of demandingness, less extreme classification criteria, more control variables, and a higher proportion of Black and Hispanic youth than in previous studies.

Results. Authoritative parenting was associated with high scores for all race and gender groups, even after the background factors were controlled. Authoritarian parenting was not as beneficial to African Americans or as detrimental to European Americans as in previous studies. Permissive and neglectful parenting styles were associated with lower test scores for all groups, especially for African Americans. Consequently, the race gap in achievement was non-existent for those with authoritative parents, but was rather dramatic for those with non-authoritative parents.

Conclusion. Baumrind's conception of authoritative parenting is optimal for all American race and gender groups' achievement. Parenting interventions that teach this conception of authoritative parenting should be the focus of family-based prevention interventions.

Bibliography Citation
Mandara, Jelani. "The Effects of Parenting Styles on Adolescent Achievement Test Scores: Ethnic and Gender Differences (And Similarities)." Working Paper, School of Education and Social Policy, Northwestern University, 2006.
6. Mandara, Jelani
Greene, Nereira
Varner, Fatima
Intergenerational Predictors of the Black-White Achievement Gap in Adolescence
Presented: Cambridge, MA, Achievement Gap Initiative Conference, Harvard University, June 2006.
Also: http://agi.harvard.edu/events/download.php?id=41
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Graduate School of Education, Harvard University
Keyword(s): Child Self-Administered Supplement (CSAS); Ethnic Differences; Grandparents; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission; Parenthood; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Intergenerational predictors of the Black-White achievement gap among 2108 adolescents from the NLSY were examined. The results showed that the gaps in SES and achievement significantly reduced over the past few generations. Moreover, grandparents' education and occupational prestige accounted for 20% of the achievement gap, but were completely mediated by parent and adolescent factors. Parents' SES, achievement, and parenting accounted for almost all of the remaining ethnic differences in math and reading scores. Parental demandingness and adolescent health and motivation had particularly large unique effects on achievement. It was concluded that adjusting for these differences across generations would, theoretically, all but eliminate the Black-White test score gap. The need for culturally specific parenting interventions was also discussed.
Bibliography Citation
Mandara, Jelani, Nereira Greene and Fatima Varner. "Intergenerational Predictors of the Black-White Achievement Gap in Adolescence." Presented: Cambridge, MA, Achievement Gap Initiative Conference, Harvard University, June 2006.
7. Mandara, Jelani
Greene, Nereira
Varner, Fatima
Intergenerational Predictors of the Black-White Achievement Gap in Adolescence
Working Paper, School of Education and Social Policy, Northwestern University, 2006
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: School of Education and Social Policy, Northwestern University
Keyword(s): Birthweight; Family Structure; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Household Composition; Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission; Parenting Skills/Styles; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading); Racial Differences; Test Scores/Test theory/IRT

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Intergenerational predictors of the Black-White achievement gap among 2108 adolescents from the NLSY were examined. The results showed that the gaps in SES and achievement significantly reduced over the past few generations. Moreover, grandparents' education and occupational prestige accounted for 20% of the achievement gap, but were completely mediated by parent and adolescent factors. Parents' SES, achievement, and parenting accounted for almost all of the remaining ethnic differences in math and reading scores. Parental demandingness and adolescent health and motivation had particularly large unique effects on achievement. It was concluded that adjusting for these differences across generations would, theoretically, all but eliminate the Black-White test score gap. The need for culturally specific parenting interventions was also discussed.
Bibliography Citation
Mandara, Jelani, Nereira Greene and Fatima Varner. "Intergenerational Predictors of the Black-White Achievement Gap in Adolescence." Working Paper, School of Education and Social Policy, Northwestern University, 2006.
8. Mandara, Jelani
Rogers, Sheba Y.
Zinbarg, Richard E.
The Effects of Family Structure on African American Adolescents' Marijuana Use
Journal of Marriage and Family 73,3 (June 2011): 557–569.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1741-3737.2011.00832.x/full
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Blackwell Publishing, Inc. => Wiley Online
Keyword(s): Child Self-Administered Supplement (CSAS); Children, Poverty; Drug Use; Family Structure; Neighborhood Effects; Risk-Taking; Self-Regulation/Self-Control

The relationship between family structure and marijuana use throughout adolescence was assessed among 1,069 African Americans from the NLSY. A model was also tested suggesting that the effects of family structure on marijuana use would be mediated by poverty, neighborhood quality, and adolescents' self-control. As most prior studies have found, family structure was not related to female adolescents' marijuana use. For young men, being raised with both biological parents was associated with less marijuana use throughout adolescence compared to those whose mothers never married, divorced early and never remarried, or divorced and remarried. Some support for the model was also found. We concluded that being raised without the presence of a biological father is a risk factor for marijuana use among young men, but African American young women from single-parent households have unique resources that protect them from marijuana use. Understanding those resources may offer insight into prevention programs for other youth.
Bibliography Citation
Mandara, Jelani, Sheba Y. Rogers and Richard E. Zinbarg. "The Effects of Family Structure on African American Adolescents' Marijuana Use." Journal of Marriage and Family 73,3 (June 2011): 557–569. A.
9. Mandara, Jelani
Varner, Fatima
Greene, Nereira
Richman, Scott
Intergenerational Family Predictors of the Black–White Achievement Gap
Journal of Educational Psychology 101,4 (November 2009): 867-878.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science?_ob=ArticleURL&_udi=B6WYD-4XRB1BJ-8&_user=10&_coverDate=11%2F30%2F2009&_rdoc=1&_fmt=high&_orig=search&_origin=search&_sort=d&_docanchor=&view=c&_searchStrId=1445411383&_rerunOrigin=google&_acct=C000050221&_version=1&_urlVersion=0&_userid=10&md5=a58744d92191a40bde5e2d07444cc995&searchtype=a
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: American Psychological Association (APA)
Keyword(s): Child Self-Administered Supplement (CSAS); Chores (see Housework); Ethnic Differences; Family Structure; Grandparents; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Housework/Housewives; Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission; Parenting Skills/Styles; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading)

The authors examined intergenerational family predictors of the Black–White achievement gap among 4,406 adolescents from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth. An intergenerational model of the process by which family factors contribute to the achievement gap was also tested. The results showed that the ethnic gaps in socioeconomic status (SES) and achievement had significantly reduced over the past few generations. Moreover, measures of grandparent SES, mothers' achievement, parent SES, and a comprehensive set of reliable parenting practices explained all of the ethnic differences in achievement scores. Parenting practices such as creating a school-oriented home environment, allowing adolescents to make decisions, and not burdening them with too many chores had particularly important effects on the achievement gap. The authors conclude that adjusting for these differences would eliminate the ethnic achievement gap.
Bibliography Citation
Mandara, Jelani, Fatima Varner, Nereira Greene and Scott Richman. "Intergenerational Family Predictors of the Black–White Achievement Gap." Journal of Educational Psychology 101,4 (November 2009): 867-878.
10. Mandara, Jelani
Varner, Fatima
Richman, Scott
Do African American Mothers Really "Love" Their Sons and "Raise" Their Daughters?
Journal of Family Psychology 24,1 (February 2010): 41-50.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0893320010600062
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: American Psychological Association (APA)
Keyword(s): Behavioral Differences; Behavioral Problems; Black Family; Black Studies; Gender Differences; Siblings; Sociability/Socialization/Social Interaction

This study assessed 1500 adolescents from the National Longitudinal Study of Youth to test the hypothesis that African American mothers differentially socialize their girls and boys. The results showed that later-born boys had fewer chores, argued more with their mothers, lived in less cognitively stimulating homes, and were not allowed to make the same decisions as were the girls or firstborn boys at the same age. The later-born boys were also lowest in achievement and highest in externalizing behaviors. Parenting differences accounted for the achievement differences but not for the externalizing behavior differences. It was concluded that the later-born boys would achieve at the same rates as their siblings if they were socialized in the same manner as their siblings.
Bibliography Citation
Mandara, Jelani, Fatima Varner and Scott Richman. "Do African American Mothers Really "Love" Their Sons and "Raise" Their Daughters? ." Journal of Family Psychology 24,1 (February 2010): 41-50.
11. Varner, Fatima
Mandara, Jelani
Marital Transitions and Changes in African American Mothers' Depressive Symptoms: The Buffering Role of Financial Resources.
Journal of Family Psychology 23,6 (December 2009): 839-847.
Also: http://psycnet.apa.org/index.cfm?fa=search.displayRecord&uid=2009-23534-009
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: American Psychological Association (APA)
Keyword(s): Assets; Black Family; Depression (see also CESD); Divorce; Health, Mental; Marital Status

The effects of changes in marital status on the changes in depressive symptoms of 443 African American mothers from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 (NLSY) were examined. Results showed that those mothers who exited marriage increased in depressive symptoms relative to continuously married and newly married mothers. Moreover, mothers who entered marriage later experienced the same level of depressive symptoms as continuously married mothers. However, financial resources moderated the effects of marital transitions. Those mothers with more financial resources did not experience an increase in depressive symptoms after divorce, but those with fewer resources experienced a large increase. It was concluded that divorce is a risk factor for mental health concerns among African American mothers, but financial resources serve as a protective factor.
Bibliography Citation
Varner, Fatima and Jelani Mandara. "Marital Transitions and Changes in African American Mothers' Depressive Symptoms: The Buffering Role of Financial Resources." Journal of Family Psychology 23,6 (December 2009): 839-847.