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Author: Mansour, Hani
Resulting in 6 citations.
1. Kuhn, Peter
Mansour, Hani
Is Internet Job Search Still Ineffective?
The Economic Journal 124,581 (December 2014): 1213-1233.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/ecoj.12119/abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Royal Economic Society (RES)
Keyword(s): Computer Use; Job Search; Unemployment

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Using NLSY97 data for 2005-2008, we find that unemployed persons who look for work online are re-employed about 25 percent faster than comparable workers who do not search online. This finding contrasts with previous results for 1998-2001 and is robust to controls for cognitive test scores and detailed indicators of Internet access. Internet job search appears to be most effective in reducing unemployment durations when used to contact friends and relatives, to send out resumes or fill out applications, and also to look at ads. We detect a weak positive relationship between IJS and wage growth between jobs.
Bibliography Citation
Kuhn, Peter and Hani Mansour. "Is Internet Job Search Still Ineffective?" The Economic Journal 124,581 (December 2014): 1213-1233.
2. Mansour, Hani
Does Employer Learning Vary by Occupation?
Journal of Labor Economics 30,2 (April 2012): 415-444.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1086/663590
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
Keyword(s): Current Population Survey (CPS) / CPS-Fertility Supplement; Occupations; Wage Dynamics; Work Experience

Models of employer learning have two implications: first, the distribution of wages becomes more dispersed as a cohort of workers gains experience; second, the coefficient on an ability correlate that employers initially do not observe grows with experience. If learning by employers varies across occupations, both of these indicators of learning should covary positively across groups defined by a worker’s initial occupational assignment. This paper tests these implications using data from the NLSY79 and CPS. I find that there is significant heterogeneity in the employer learning process across occupations and that occupational assignment affects the learning process independently of education.
Bibliography Citation
Mansour, Hani. "Does Employer Learning Vary by Occupation?" Journal of Labor Economics 30,2 (April 2012): 415-444.
3. Mansour, Hani
The Career Effects of Graduating from College in a Bad Economy: The Role of Workers’ Ability
Working Paper, University of Colorado-Denver and DIW Berlin, November 2009.
Also: econ.ucdenver.edu/mansour/BC09.pdf
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: University of Colorado-Denver
Keyword(s): Career Patterns; Earnings; Economic Changes/Recession; Wage Dynamics

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The literature on cohort effects, particularly the effects of graduating from college in a bad economy on wages, provide a wide range of estimates that vary both in magnitude and persistence. In this paper, I provide a simple explanation that reconciles the results in the literature. Using data from the NLSY79 and CPS ORG covering the graduating cohorts of 1979-1989 and 1979-1997, respectively, I provide evidence that workers who graduate from college during higher unemployment rates are positively selected from the ability distribution of college graduates. Consequently, not accounting for a measure of the worker’s ability underestimates the effects of higher unemployment rates at graduation on wages and weakens their persistence. The results from both data sets suggest that an increase of one percentage point in the unemployment rate induces a modest 2 percent wage loss that fades after 5 years. However, once I control for the worker’s AFQT score, the initial effect of wages becomes larger, about a 5 percent wage loss, and the effect remains as large even after 12-15 years into the worker’s career. I also show that starting a career in a recession has a signifi…cant adverse impact on the worker’s initial occupational wage.
Bibliography Citation
Mansour, Hani. "The Career Effects of Graduating from College in a Bad Economy: The Role of Workers’ Ability." Working Paper, University of Colorado-Denver and DIW Berlin, November 2009.
4. Mansour, Hani
McKinnish, Terra
Who Marries Differently Aged Spouses? Ability, Education, Occupation, Earnings, and Appearance
Review of Economics and Statistics 96,3 (July 2014): 577-580.
Also: http://www.mitpressjournals.org/doi/abs/10.1162/REST_a_00377#.V4AKbnrqXNJ
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: MIT Press
Keyword(s): Age and Ageing; Census of Population; Cognitive Ability; Educational Attainment; Marriage; National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (AddHealth)

In direct contrast to conventional wisdom and most economic models of marital age gaps, we present robust evidence that men and women who are married to differently aged spouses are negatively selected. Empirical results show lower cognitive ability, lower educational attainment, lower occupational wages, lower earnings, and less attractive appearance among those married to a differently aged spouse. These results, obtained using samples of first marriages and controlling for age of marriage, are consistent with a model in which individuals with more schooling and more upwardly mobile occupations interact more heavily with similarly aged peers and are ultimately more likely to marry similarly-aged spouses.
Bibliography Citation
Mansour, Hani and Terra McKinnish. "Who Marries Differently Aged Spouses? Ability, Education, Occupation, Earnings, and Appearance." Review of Economics and Statistics 96,3 (July 2014): 577-580.
5. Mansour, Hani
McKinnish, Terra
Who Marries Differently-Aged Spouses? Earnings, Ability and Appearance
Working Paper Series, SSRN - Social Science Research Network, April 26, 2011.
Also: http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=1823746
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Social Science Electronic Publishing, Inc.
Keyword(s): Age and Ageing; Census of Population; Cognitive Development; Earnings, Husbands; Earnings, Wives; Gender Differences; Marriage; National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (AddHealth)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

In direct contrast to conventional wisdom and most economic models of gender differences in age of marriage, we present robust evidence that men and women who are married to differently-aged spouses are negatively selected. Earnings analysis of married couples in the 1970, 1980, 1990 and 2000 Decennial Censuses finds that male earnings decrease with within-couple age difference, regardless of whether the man is older or younger than his wife. In contrast, female earnings increase with within-couple age difference. We argue and present evidence that women in differently-aged couples have higher earnings not because of positive selection, but because their hours of work increase in response to partnering with a lower earning man. We test for negative selection into differently-aged couples using three measures: average earnings per hour in occupation using Census data, cognitive skills assessments from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 cohort (NLSY79), and measures of physical appearance from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add Health). The point estimates indicate negative selection on all of these characteristics, although statistical significance varies by outcome and sample.
Bibliography Citation
Mansour, Hani and Terra McKinnish. "Who Marries Differently-Aged Spouses? Earnings, Ability and Appearance." Working Paper Series, SSRN - Social Science Research Network, April 26, 2011.
6. McKinnish, Terra
Mansour, Hani
Within-Couple Age Differences and Sorting on Earnings
Presented: Washington, DC, Population Association of America Annual Meetings, March 31-April 2, 2011. Also:http://paa2011.princeton.edu/iphone/abstractViewer.aspx?submissionId=111067
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Age and Ageing; Armed Forces Qualifications Test (AFQT); Earnings; Earnings, Husbands; Earnings, Wives; Economics of Gender; Marriage

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

We investigate the relationship between within couple age differences and earnings using samples of married couples from the 1970-2000 Decennial Censuses. We find that among married men average earnings decrease with age difference from partner in either direction. Among women the earnings pattern is the exact inverse. Among women earnings increase with age difference in either direction. Our interpretation is that individuals in differently aged couples tend to be negatively selected, but that women respond to such pairings with increased labor market effort. We find some support for our hypothesis in that the higher earnings of women in differently aged couples are not the result of being in higher earning occupations. Additional analysis with the NLSY shows that men and women in differently aged couples on average have lower AFQT scores.
Bibliography Citation
McKinnish, Terra and Hani Mansour. "Within-Couple Age Differences and Sorting on Earnings." Presented: Washington, DC, Population Association of America Annual Meetings, March 31-April 2, 2011. Also:http://paa2011.princeton.edu/iphone/abstractViewer.aspx?submissionId=111067.