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Author: Marcen, Miriam
Resulting in 2 citations.
1. Bellido, Hector
Marcen, Miriam
On the Relationship between Body Mass Index and Marital Dissolution
Economic Modelling published online (22 June 2020): DOI: 10.1016/j.econmod.2020.05.024.
Also: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0264999319316621
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Body Mass Index (BMI); Marital Dissolution; Marital Stability

The economic literature on body mass index (BMI) and marital dissolution uses simple correlations to suggest that it is the latter than alters the former. We argue here that the opposite is also potential because the higher the BMI, the lower the remarriage potential and the greater the demand for health care, which should decrease the probability of marital dissolution. We empirically explore the role of BMI on marital dissolution showing that those who are overweight are more likely to stay married. This is maintained when we examine causality by exploiting the exogeneity of the dates in which data are collected combined with BMI's seasonality. Although BMI appears to stabilize marriage, this implies a reduction in the bargaining power of individuals with a high BMI in marriage, which, according to our findings, has a greater impact on White women.
Bibliography Citation
Bellido, Hector and Miriam Marcen. "On the Relationship between Body Mass Index and Marital Dissolution." Economic Modelling published online (22 June 2020): DOI: 10.1016/j.econmod.2020.05.024.
2. Bellido, Hector
Marcen, Miriam
Molina, Jose Alberto
The Effect of Culture on Fertility Behavior of US Teen Mothers
Feminist Economics 22,3 (2016): 101-126.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/13545701.2015.1120881
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY97
Publisher: Routledge ==> Taylor & Francis (1998)
Keyword(s): Adolescent Fertility; Census of Population; Family Background and Culture; Fertility; Teenagers

This paper studies the impact of culture on the fertility behavior of teenage women in the US. To identify this effect, it took an epidemiological approach, exploiting the variations in teenage women's fertility rates by ancestral home country. Using three different databases (the US National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979, the US National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997, and the 2000 US Census), the results show that culture has quantitatively important effects on the fertility behavior of teenage women. This finding is robust to alternative specifications, to the introduction of a range of home country variables to proxy culture, and to the measurement of individual characteristics present when teenage women continue with a pregnancy to have a child.
Bibliography Citation
Bellido, Hector, Miriam Marcen and Jose Alberto Molina. "The Effect of Culture on Fertility Behavior of US Teen Mothers." Feminist Economics 22,3 (2016): 101-126.