Search Results

Author: Martin, Anne
Resulting in 5 citations.
1. Gardner, Margo
Martin, Anne
Petitclerc, Amelie
Mothers' Postsecondary Entry during Early Childhood: Short- and Long-term Effects on Children
Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology 62 (May-June 2019): 11-25.
Also: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0193397318300856
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Children, Academic Development; Education, Adult; Mothers, Education; Parental Influences; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading)

This study explored the implications of low-income mothers' entry into post-secondary education (PSE) during their children's first five years of life. Using propensity score matching to analyze data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth of 1979, we examined associations between maternal entry into PSE during early childhood and children's short- and long-term (ages 7 and 13, respectively) academic and socioemotional outcomes. We found that mothers' entry into PSE during early childhood had no short-term effects on children. There were, however, long-term positive effects on academic outcomes among children with a coresident father figure, and negative effects on behavior. We also tested explanatory mechanisms and found that maternal PSE entry had positive long-term effects on household income, but income did not mediate effects on long-term child outcomes. Further, maternal PSE had no effects on the home learning environment, mothers' educational expectations for children, maternal presence at home, or family climate.
Bibliography Citation
Gardner, Margo, Anne Martin and Amelie Petitclerc. "Mothers' Postsecondary Entry during Early Childhood: Short- and Long-term Effects on Children." Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology 62 (May-June 2019): 11-25.
2. Leventhal, Tama
Martin, Anne
Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne
EC-HOME Across Five National Data Sets in the 3rd to 5th Year of Life
Parenting: Science and Practice 4, 2-3 (April-September 2004): 161-188.
Also: http://www.parentingscienceandpractice.com/Past_Contents/V4_2_3/v4_2_3.htm
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates ==> Taylor & Francis
Keyword(s): Behavior; Cognitive Ability; Cognitive Development; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID)

Permission to reprint the abstract has been denied by the publisher.

Bibliography Citation
Leventhal, Tama, Anne Martin and Jeanne Brooks-Gunn. "EC-HOME Across Five National Data Sets in the 3rd to 5th Year of Life." Parenting: Science and Practice 4, 2-3 (April-September 2004): 161-188.
3. Linver, Miriam R.
Martin, Anne
Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne
Measuring Infants' Home Environment: The IT-HOME for Infants between Birth and 12 Months in Four National Datasets
Parenting: Science and Practice 4, 2-3 (April-September 2004): 259-270.
Also: http://www.parentingscienceandpractice.com/Past_Contents/V4_2_3/v4_2_3.htm
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates ==> Taylor & Francis
Keyword(s): Home Environment; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Infants; Self-Reporting

Permission to reprint the abstract has been denied by the publisher.

Bibliography Citation
Linver, Miriam R., Anne Martin and Jeanne Brooks-Gunn. "Measuring Infants' Home Environment: The IT-HOME for Infants between Birth and 12 Months in Four National Datasets." Parenting: Science and Practice 4, 2-3 (April-September 2004): 259-270.
4. Martin, Anne
Gardner, Margo
College Expectations for All? The Early Adult Outcomes of Low-Achieving Adolescents Who Expect to Earn a Bachelor's Degree
Applied Developmental Science 20,2 (2016): 108-120.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/10888691.2015.1080596
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
Keyword(s): Achievement; College Degree; Depression (see also CESD); Educational Aspirations/Expectations; Educational Attainment; Income; National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (AddHealth)

Critics of the college-for-all ethos argue that it encourages low-achieving adolescents to develop unrealistically high expectations. This argument posits that low-achievers waste time and money, and risk disappointment and self-recrimination, pursuing college when they are unlikely to complete it. The present study uses two national data sets--Add Health and the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979--to test the proposition that expecting to earn a bachelor's degree (BA) puts low-achieving students at risk of disadvantageous early adult outcomes. Youth reported their educational expectations in high school, and their income-to-needs ratios and depressive symptoms were measured approximately a decade later. Results in both data sets suggest that the expectation of a BA was advantageous for all students, regardless of achievement level. Low-achievers who expected to earn a BA had higher educational attainment, higher income-to-needs ratios, and fewer depressive symptoms than low-achievers who did not expect to earn a BA.
Bibliography Citation
Martin, Anne and Margo Gardner. "College Expectations for All? The Early Adult Outcomes of Low-Achieving Adolescents Who Expect to Earn a Bachelor's Degree." Applied Developmental Science 20,2 (2016): 108-120.
5. Martin, Anne
Gardner, Margo
Petitclerc, Amelie
Low-income Mothers' Entry into Postsecondary Education during Middle Childhood: Effects on Adolescents
Children and Youth Services Review published online (19 August 2019): DOI: 10.1016/j.childyouth.2019.104470.
Also: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0190740919304670
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Adolescent Behavior; Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Delinquency/Gang Activity; Education, Adult; Income Level; Mothers, Education; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading); Socioeconomic Status (SES); Substance Use

This study tests whether young adolescents' achievement and behavior are associated with their mother's entry into post-secondary education (PSE) during their middle childhood years. It also examines five family processes that may link maternal PSE to development in middle childhood (income, home learning environment, mother's educational expectations for child, maternal presence, and family affective climate). The sample selects low-income families from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth of 1979. Propensity score weighting adjusts for mothers' self-selection into PSE. We find that adolescents whose mothers entered PSE in their middle childhood scored higher than their peers on math, but similarly on reading, behavior problems, delinquency, and substance use. There were no associations between mothers' PSE entry and the proposed mediators.
Bibliography Citation
Martin, Anne, Margo Gardner and Amelie Petitclerc. "Low-income Mothers' Entry into Postsecondary Education during Middle Childhood: Effects on Adolescents." Children and Youth Services Review published online (19 August 2019): DOI: 10.1016/j.childyouth.2019.104470.