Search Results

Author: Meghir, Costas
Resulting in 8 citations.
1. Abbott, Brant
Gallipoli, Giovanni
Meghir, Costas
Violante, Giovanni L.
Education Policy and Intergenerational Transfers in Equilibrium
NBER Working Paper No. 18782, National Bureau of Economic Research, February 2013.
Also: http://www.nber.org/papers/w18782
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79, NLSY97
Publisher: National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)
Keyword(s): Armed Forces Qualifications Test (AFQT); Credit/Credit Constraint; Current Population Survey (CPS) / CPS-Fertility Supplement; Educational Costs; Financial Assistance; I.Q.; Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission; Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Transfers, Family; Transfers, Financial

This paper compares partial and general equilibrium effects of alternative financial aid policies intended to promote college participation. We build an overlapping generations life-cycle, heterogeneous-agent, incomplete-markets model with education, labor supply, and consumption/ saving decisions. Altruistic parents make inter vivos transfers to their children. Labor supply during college, government grants and loans, as well as private loans, complement parental transfers as sources of funding for college education. We find that the current financial aid system in the U.S. improves welfare, and removing it would reduce GDP by two percentage points in the long-run. Any further relaxation of government-sponsored loan limits would have no salient effects. The short-run partial equilibrium effects of expanding tuition grants (especially their need-based component) are sizeable. However, long-run general equilibrium effects are 3-4 times smaller. Every additional dollar of government grants crowds out 20-30 cents of parental transfers.
Bibliography Citation
Abbott, Brant, Giovanni Gallipoli, Costas Meghir and Giovanni L. Violante. "Education Policy and Intergenerational Transfers in Equilibrium." NBER Working Paper No. 18782, National Bureau of Economic Research, February 2013.
2. Carneiro, Pedro M.
Meghir, Costas
Parey, Matthias
Intergenerational Effects of Mothers Schooling on Children's Outcomes: Causal Links and Transmission Channels
Working Paper, Institute for Fiscal Studies (IFS), London, October 12, 2005.
Also: http://www.fundacionareces.es/PDF/educacion/carneiro.pdf
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Institute for Fiscal Studies (IFS), London
Keyword(s): Armed Forces Qualifications Test (AFQT); Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Educational Aspirations/Expectations; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission; Mothers, Education; Parental Influences; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); School Progress; Tuition; Variables, Instrumental

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The objective of this paper is to investigate mothers education as a driving force behind children's schooling outcomes and to explore channels through which the effect of mothers schooling is transmitted. Using matched data from the female participants of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY79) and their children, we study the causal effect of mothers education on children's outcomes when they are aged nine to ten. We exploit geographical and intertemporal variation in mothers schooling cost at the time when the mother grew up. The data allows to control for mothers ability and family background factors. Our results indicate substantial intergenerational returns to education. We find that children's math test score and a measure of grade repetition are significantly affected by mothers education, but we do not find effects on an index of behavioural problems. The rich data set allows us to study different channels which may transmit the effect of mothers education on children's outcomes, including aspects of mother characteristics and parental investments. In particular, we find a significant effect of mothers education on the mothers age when she gave birth to her first child, on available family income and on the cognitive home environment provided by the parents. In line with related literature, we find IV results that are substantially higher than OLS results, indicating heterogeneity in returns.
Bibliography Citation
Carneiro, Pedro M., Costas Meghir and Matthias Parey. "Intergenerational Effects of Mothers Schooling on Children's Outcomes: Causal Links and Transmission Channels." Working Paper, Institute for Fiscal Studies (IFS), London, October 12, 2005.
3. Carneiro, Pedro M.
Meghir, Costas
Parey, Matthias
Maternal Education, Home Environments and the Development of Children and Adolescents
IZA Discussion Paper No. 3072, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA), September 2007.
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA)
Keyword(s): Armed Forces Qualifications Test (AFQT); Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Educational Aspirations/Expectations; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission; Mothers, Education; Parental Influences; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading); School Progress; Variables, Instrumental

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

We study the intergenerational effects of maternal education on children's cognitive achievement, behavioral problems, grade repetition and obesity. We address endogeneity of maternal schooling by instrumenting with variation in schooling costs when the mother grew up. Using matched data from the female participants of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 (NLSY79) and their children, we can control for mother's ability and family background factors. Our results show substantial intergenerational returns to education. For children aged 7-8, for example, our IV results indicate that an additional year of mother's schooling increases the child's performance on a standardized math test by almost 0.1 of a standard deviation, and reduces the incidence of behavioral problems. Our data set allows us to study a large array of channels which may transmit the effect of maternal education to the child, including family environment and parental investments at different ages of the child. We find that income effects, delayed childbearing, and assortative mating are likely to be important, and we show that maternal education leads to substantial differences in maternal labor supply. We investigate heterogeneity in returns, and we present results focusing both on very early stages in the child's life as well as adolescent outcomes. We present a falsification exercise to support the validity of our instruments, and our results are found to be robust in a sensitivity analysis. We discuss policy implications and relate our findings to intergenerational mobility.
Bibliography Citation
Carneiro, Pedro M., Costas Meghir and Matthias Parey. "Maternal Education, Home Environments and the Development of Children and Adolescents." IZA Discussion Paper No. 3072, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA), September 2007.
4. Carneiro, Pedro M.
Meghir, Costas
Parey, Matthias
Maternal Education, Home Environments and the Development of Children and Adolescents
Presented: Denver, CO, American Economic Association Annual Meeting, January 2011. Forthcoming: Journal of European Economic Association.
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: American Economic Association
Keyword(s): Armed Forces Qualifications Test (AFQT); Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Behavioral Problems; Cognitive Development; Educational Aspirations/Expectations; Grade Retention/Repeat Grade; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission; Mothers, Education; Obesity; Parental Influences; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading); School Progress; Variables, Instrumental

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

We study the intergenerational effects of maternal education on children's cognitive achievement, behavioral problems, grade repetition and obesity. We address endogeneity of maternal schooling by instrumenting with variation in schooling costs when the mother grew up. Using matched data from the female participants of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 (NLSY79) and their children, we can control for mother's ability and family background factors. Our results show substantial intergenerational returns to education. For children aged 7-8, for example, our IV results indicate that an additional year of mother's schooling increases the child's performance on a standardized math test by almost 0.1 of a standard deviation, and reduces the incidence of behavioral problems. Our data set allows us to study a large array of channels which may transmit the effect of maternal education to the child, including family environment and parental investments at different ages of the child. We find that income effects, delayed childbearing, and assortative mating are likely to be important, and we show that maternal education leads to substantial differences in maternal labor supply. We investigate heterogeneity in returns, and we present results focusing both on very early stages in the child's life as well as adolescent outcomes. We present a falsification exercise to support the validity of our instruments, and our results are found to be robust in a sensitivity analysis. We discuss policy implications and relate our findings to intergenerational mobility.
Bibliography Citation
Carneiro, Pedro M., Costas Meghir and Matthias Parey. "Maternal Education, Home Environments and the Development of Children and Adolescents." Presented: Denver, CO, American Economic Association Annual Meeting, January 2011. Forthcoming: Journal of European Economic Association.
5. Carneiro, Pedro M.
Meghir, Costas
Parey, Matthias
The Effect of Mother's Schooling on Children's Outcomes: Causal Links and Transmission Channels
Working Paper, University College London and Institute for Fiscal Studies, May 3, 2006.
Also: http://www.tinbergen.nl/cost/london/parey.pdf
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Institute for Fiscal Studies (IFS), London
Keyword(s): Armed Forces Qualifications Test (AFQT); Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Educational Aspirations/Expectations; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission; Mothers, Education; Parental Influences; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); School Progress; Variables, Instrumental

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Several economists have recently tried to isolate the causal effect of parental schooling on child outcomes through the use of different empirical designs, analogous to those used to examine the impact of schooling on wages, namely twin studies and instrumental variables. In this paper we follow the latter strategy and estimate the effect of maternal schooling on children's outcomes. We use white children from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 (NLSY79), a rich dataset that contains detailed information on children outcomes at several ages, home environments and maternal characteristics. The available information allows to estimate the importance of maternal schooling for several outcomes of the child at different ages, and potential channels by which an increase in maternal education translates into improved child outcomes. We instrument mother's schooling with the presence of a public four year college in the county of residence at age 14, average tuition in public 4 year colleges in the county of residence at age 17, and average unemployment rate and blue collar wages in the state of residence at age 17.
Bibliography Citation
Carneiro, Pedro M., Costas Meghir and Matthias Parey. "The Effect of Mother's Schooling on Children's Outcomes: Causal Links and Transmission Channels." Working Paper, University College London and Institute for Fiscal Studies, May 3, 2006.
6. Carneiro, Pedro
Meghir, Costas
Parey, Matthias
Maternal Education, Home Environments, and the Development of Children and Adolescents
Journal of the European Economic Association 11, s1 (January 2013): 123-160.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1542-4774.2012.01096.x/abstract
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Wiley Online
Keyword(s): Achievement; Armed Forces Qualifications Test (AFQT); Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Body Mass Index (BMI); Cognitive Development; Grade Retention/Repeat Grade; Home Environment; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission; Mothers, Education; Motor and Social Development (MSD); Obesity; Parental Investments; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

We study the intergenerational effects of maternal education on children’s cognitive achievement, behavioral problems, grade repetition, and obesity, using matched data from the female participants of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 (NLSY79) and their children. We address the endogeneity of maternal schooling by instrumenting it with variation in schooling costs during the mother’s adolescence. Our results show substantial intergenerational returns to education. Our data set allows us to study a large array of channels which may transmit the effect of maternal education to the child, including family environment and parental investments at different ages of the child. We discuss policy implications and relate our findings to the literature on intergenerational mobility. © 2013 European Economic Association
Bibliography Citation
Carneiro, Pedro, Costas Meghir and Matthias Parey. "Maternal Education, Home Environments, and the Development of Children and Adolescents." Journal of the European Economic Association 11, s1 (January 2013): 123-160.
7. Lise, Jeremy
Meghir, Costas
Robin, Jean-Marc
Matching, Sorting and Wages
Review of Economic Dynamics 19 (January 2016): 63-87.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S109420251500071X
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Society for Economic Dynamics
Keyword(s): Employment, History; Job Search; Modeling; Wage Determination

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

We develop an empirical search-matching model which is suitable for analyzing the wage, employment and welfare impact of regulation in a labor market with heterogeneous workers and jobs. To achieve this we develop an equilibrium model of wage determination and employment which extends the current literature on equilibrium wage determination with matching and provides a bridge between some of the most prominent macro models and microeconometric research. The model incorporates productivity shocks, long-term contracts, on-the-job search and counter-offers. Importantly, the model allows for the possibility of assortative matching between workers and jobs due to complementarities between worker and job characteristics. We use the model to estimate the potential gain from optimal regulation and we consider the potential gains and redistributive impacts from optimal unemployment benefit policy. Here optimal policy is defined as that which maximizes total output and home production, accounting for the various constraints that arise from search frictions. The model is estimated on the NLSY using the method of moments.
Bibliography Citation
Lise, Jeremy, Costas Meghir and Jean-Marc Robin. "Matching, Sorting and Wages." Review of Economic Dynamics 19 (January 2016): 63-87.
8. Lise, Jeremy
Meghir, Costas
Robin, Jean-Marc
Mismatch, Sorting and Wage Dynamics
Working Paper W13/16, Institute for Fiscal Studies (IFS), Economic and Social Research Council, January 2013.
Also: http://www.ifs.org.uk/wps/wp201316.pdf
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Institute for Fiscal Studies (IFS), London
Keyword(s): Employment; Modeling; Unemployment Insurance; Wage Determination

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

We develop an empirical search-matching model which is suitable for analyzing the wage, employment and welfare impact of regulation in a labor market with heterogeneous workers and jobs. To achieve this we develop an equilibrium model of wage determination and employment which extends the current literature on equilibrium wage determination with matching and provides a bridge between some of the most prominent macro models and microeconometric research. The model incorporates productivity shocks, long-term contracts, on-the-job search and counter-offers. Importantly, the model allows for the possibility of assortative matching between workers and jobs due to complementarities between worker and job characteristics. We use the model to estimate the potential gain from optimal regulation and we consider the potential gains and redistributive impacts from optimal unemployment insurance policy. The model is estimated on the NLSY using the method of moments.
Bibliography Citation
Lise, Jeremy, Costas Meghir and Jean-Marc Robin. "Mismatch, Sorting and Wage Dynamics." Working Paper W13/16, Institute for Fiscal Studies (IFS), Economic and Social Research Council, January 2013.