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Author: Nazarov, Zafar
Resulting in 5 citations.
1. Nazarov, Zafar
Maternal Input Choices and Child Cognitive Development: Testing for Reverse Causality
RAND Working Paper WR-813, Rand Corporation, November 2010.
Also: http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=1721101
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: RAND
Keyword(s): Achievement; Child Care; Maternal Employment; Parental Investments; Parents, Single; Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test (PPVT); Test Scores/Test theory/IRT; Welfare

This paper assesses whether the results of child achievement tests affect maternal employment and the child-care choices of mothers with prekindergarten children. To test this hypothesis, it first incorporates into Bernal and Keane's (2010) model the mother's imperfect knowledge of the child's cognitive ability endowment and possible mechanisms through which the mother may learn the child's endowment. Then it uses a quasi-structural approach to form approximations to the mother's employment and child-care decision rules and jointly estimate them with the child cognitive development production function and wage equation. Using a sample of single mothers from the NLSY79, it finds evidence that maternal employment and child-care decisions are sensitive to past achievement scores. In particular, a mother whose child has taken the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test before entering kindergarten and whose child's standardized test score is above a certain threshold intends to use child care more and work more part-time hours immediately after observing the child's performance on the achievement test.
Bibliography Citation
Nazarov, Zafar. "Maternal Input Choices and Child Cognitive Development: Testing for Reverse Causality." RAND Working Paper WR-813, Rand Corporation, November 2010.
2. Nazarov, Zafar
Maternal Input Choices and Child Cognitive Development: Testing for Reverse Causality
Applied Economics Letters published online (16 March 2019): DOI: 10.1080/13504851.2019.1591588.
Also: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/13504851.2019.1591588
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Routledge ==> Taylor & Francis (1998)
Keyword(s): Achievement; Child Care; Maternal Employment; Parental Investments; Parents, Single; Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test (PPVT)

I assess whether the results of child achievement tests affect maternal employment and the child-care choices of mothers with prekindergarten children. To test this hypothesis, I use a quasi-structural approach to form approximations to the mother's employment and child-care decision rules and jointly estimate them with the child cognitive development production function and wage equation. Using a sample of single mothers from the NLSY79, I find evidence that maternal employment and child-care decisions are sensitive to past achievement scores. In particular, a mother whose child has taken the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test before entering kindergarten and whose child's standardized test score is above a certain threshold intends to use childcare more and work more part-time hours immediately after observing the child's performance on the achievement test.
Bibliography Citation
Nazarov, Zafar. "Maternal Input Choices and Child Cognitive Development: Testing for Reverse Causality." Applied Economics Letters published online (16 March 2019): DOI: 10.1080/13504851.2019.1591588.
3. Rendall, Michael S.
Ghosh-Dastidar, Bonnie
Weden, Margaret M.
Nazarov, Zafar
Socio-Demographic Differentials in Experiencing a Major Occupational Injury in the Prime Working Ages: Estimation Using Within-Survey and Cross-Survey Multiple Imputation of Injury Histories
Presented: Washington, DC, Population Association of America Annual Meetings, March 31-April 2, 2011
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Accidents; Injuries, Workplace; Modeling, Hazard/Event History/Survival/Duration; Survey of Income and Program Participation (SIPP)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Sociodemographic differentials in ever experiencing a major workplace injury in the prime working ages (25 to 44) are estimated from left- and right-censored injury histories in the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY79), and the Survey of Income and Program Participation (SIPP). Because the injury hazard is higher for individuals with previous injuries, the age-specific hazard for those with no previous injury since age 25 must first be estimated. Injury histories from age 25, however, are available for a fraction of the NLSY sample and for none in the SIPP sample (only the most recent injury is recorded). For unbiased incorporation of all NLSY and SIPP observations, injury histories are first multiply imputed within the NLSY from non-left-censored histories. Injury histories are then multiply imputed from this “completed” NLSY dataset to every SIPP individual. Efficiency and bias of NLSY-only and NLSY-SIPP estimation are compared to estimation that ignores injury history.
Bibliography Citation
Rendall, Michael S., Bonnie Ghosh-Dastidar, Margaret M. Weden and Zafar Nazarov. "Socio-Demographic Differentials in Experiencing a Major Occupational Injury in the Prime Working Ages: Estimation Using Within-Survey and Cross-Survey Multiple Imputation of Injury Histories." Presented: Washington, DC, Population Association of America Annual Meetings, March 31-April 2, 2011.
4. Rendall, Michael S.
Weden, Margaret M.
Lau, Christopher
Brownell, Peter B.
Nazarov, Zafar
Fernandes, Meenakshi
Evaluation of Bias in Estimates of Early Childhood Obesity From Parent-Reported Heights and Weights
American Journal of Public Health 104,7 (July 2014): 1255-1262.
Also: http://ajph.aphapublications.org/doi/full/10.2105/AJPH.2014.302001
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: American Public Health Association
Keyword(s): Body Mass Index (BMI); Child Health; Data Quality/Consistency; Height; Obesity; Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID); Weight

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Objectives: We evaluated bias in estimated obesity prevalence owing to error in parental reporting. We also evaluated bias mitigation through application of Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s biologically implausible value (BIV) cutoffs.

Methods: We simulated obesity prevalence of children aged 2 to 5 years in 2 panel surveys after counterfactually substituting parameters estimated from 1999-2008 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey data for prevalence of extreme height and weight and for proportions obese in extreme height or weight categories.

Results: Heights reported below the first and fifth height-for-age percentiles explained between one half and two thirds, respectively, of total bias in obesity prevalence. Bias was reduced by one tenth when excluding cases with height-for-age and weight-for-age BIVs and by one fifth when excluding cases with body mass–index-for-age BIVs. Applying BIVs, however, resulted in incorrect exclusion of nonnegligible proportions of obese children.

Conclusions: Correcting the reporting of children's heights in the first percentile alone may reduce overestimation of early childhood obesity prevalence in surveys with parental reporting by one half to two thirds. Excluding BIVs has limited effectiveness in mitigating this bias.

Bibliography Citation
Rendall, Michael S., Margaret M. Weden, Christopher Lau, Peter B. Brownell, Zafar Nazarov and Meenakshi Fernandes. "Evaluation of Bias in Estimates of Early Childhood Obesity From Parent-Reported Heights and Weights." American Journal of Public Health 104,7 (July 2014): 1255-1262.
5. Weden, Margaret M.
Brownell, Peter B.
Rendall, Michael S.
Lau, Christopher
Fernandes, Meenakshi
Nazarov, Zafar
Parent-Reported Height and Weight as Sources of Bias in Survey Estimates of Childhood Obesity
American Journal of Epidemiology 178,3 (1 August 2013): 461-473.
Also: http://aje.oxfordjournals.org/content/178/3/461.abstract
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: Johns Hopkins University Press
Keyword(s): Body Mass Index (BMI); Child Health; Data Quality/Consistency; Height; Obesity; Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID); Weight

Parental reporting of height and weight was evaluated for US children aged 2–13 years. The prevalence of obesity (defined as a body mass index value (calculated as weight (kg)/height (m)2) in the 95th percentile or higher) and its height and weight components were compared in child supplements of 2 nationally representative surveys: the 1996–2008 Children of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 Cohort (NLSY79-Child) and the 1997 Child Development Supplement of the Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID-CDS). Sociodemographic differences in parent reporting error were analyzed. Error was largest for children aged 2–5 years. Underreporting of height, not overreporting of weight, generated a strong upward bias in obesity prevalence at those ages. Frequencies of parent-reported heights below the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (Atlanta, Georgia) first percentile were implausibly high at 16.5% (95% confidence interval (CI): 14.3, 19.0) in the NLSY79-Child and 20.6% (95% CI: 16.0, 26.3) in the PSID-CDS. They were highest among low-income children at 33.2% (95% CI: 22.4, 46.1) in the PSID-CDS and 26.2% (95% CI: 20.2, 33.2) in the NLSY79-Child. Bias in the reporting of obesity decreased with children's age and reversed direction at ages 12–13 years. Underreporting of weight increased with age, and underreporting of height decreased with age. We recommend caution to researchers who use parent-reported heights, especially for very young children, and offer practical solutions for survey data collection and research on child obesity.
Bibliography Citation
Weden, Margaret M., Peter B. Brownell, Michael S. Rendall, Christopher Lau, Meenakshi Fernandes and Zafar Nazarov. "Parent-Reported Height and Weight as Sources of Bias in Survey Estimates of Childhood Obesity." American Journal of Epidemiology 178,3 (1 August 2013): 461-473.