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Author: Patil, Divya
Resulting in 3 citations.
1. Cohen, Alison K.
Kazi, Chandni
Headen, Irene
Rehkopf, David
Hendrick, C. Emily
Patil, Divya
Abrams, Barbara
Educational Attainment and Gestational Weight Gain among U.S. Mothers
Women's Health Issues 26,4 (July-August 2016): 460-467.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1049386716300457
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Body Mass Index (BMI); Educational Attainment; Gestation/Gestational weight gain; Weight

Methods: We used data from 1979 through 2010 for women in the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (1979) cohort (n = 6,344 pregnancies from 2,769 women). We used generalized estimating equations to estimate the association between educational attainment and GWG adequacy (as defined by 2009 Institute of Medicine guidelines), controlling for diverse social factors from across the life course (e.g., income, wealth, educational aspirations and expectations) and considering effect measure modification by race/ethnicity and prepregnancy overweight status.

Results: In most cases, women with more education had increased odds of gaining a recommended amount of gestational weight, independent of educational aspirations and educational expectations and relatively robust to sensitivity analyses. This trend manifested itself in a few different ways. Those with less education had higher odds of inadequate GWG than those with more education. Among those who were not overweight before pregnancy, those with less education had higher odds of excessive GWG than college graduates. Among women who were White, those with less than a high school degree had higher odds of excessive GWG than those with more education.

Bibliography Citation
Cohen, Alison K., Chandni Kazi, Irene Headen, David Rehkopf, C. Emily Hendrick, Divya Patil and Barbara Abrams. "Educational Attainment and Gestational Weight Gain among U.S. Mothers." Women's Health Issues 26,4 (July-August 2016): 460-467.
2. Patil, Divya
The Association Between Maternal Work Precarity and Infant Low Birth Weight in a Nationally Representative Cohort of Women in the United States
Master's Thesis, Department of Epidemiology, University of Washington, 2018
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: ProQuest Dissertations & Theses (PQDT)
Keyword(s): Birthweight; Job Characteristics; Maternal Employment; Work Hours

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

As a larger proportion of women enter and remain in the workforce, consideration should be given to how work characteristics can affect pregnancy outcomes. We investigated the association between maternal work precarity and delivery of a low birth weight infant. Data on work characteristics and covariates were collected from 2,871 women enrolled in the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 and outcome information was obtained from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth Children Cohort. Work precarity was characterized as a composite measure of four work characteristics (material rewards [score 0-2], working time arrangements [score 0-2], collective organization [score 0-1], and employability opportunities [score 0-1]) and was categorized into three groups labeled low (0-2), medium (3), and high (4-6) based on the number of characteristics that a participant had. Low birth weight was defined as weight less than 2500 grams at birth.
Bibliography Citation
Patil, Divya. The Association Between Maternal Work Precarity and Infant Low Birth Weight in a Nationally Representative Cohort of Women in the United States. Master's Thesis, Department of Epidemiology, University of Washington, 2018.
3. Rehkopf, David
Headen, Irene
Hubbard, Alan
Deardorff, Julianna
Kesavan, Yamini
Cohen, Alison K.
Patil, Divya
Ritchie, Lorrene
Abrams, Barbara
Adverse Childhood Experiences and Later Life Adult Obesity and Smoking in the United States
Annals of Epidemiology 26,7 (July 2016): 488-492.e5.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1047279716301600
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Childhood; Childhood Adversity/Trauma; Household Influences; Modeling, Instrumental Variables; Obesity; Smoking (see Cigarette Use)

Background: Prior work demonstrates associations between physical abuse, household alcohol abuse and household mental illness early in life with obesity and smoking. Studies, however, have not generally been in nationally representative samples and have not conducted analyses to account for bias in the exposure.

Methods: We used data from the 1979 U.S. National Longitudinal Survey of Youth to test associations between measures of adverse childhood experiences with obesity and smoking and used an instrumental variables approach to address potential measurement error of the exposure.

Results: Models demonstrated associations between childhood physical abuse and obesity at age 40 years (OR 1.23, 95% CI 1.00-1.52) and ever smoking (OR 1.83, 95% CI 1.56-2.16), as well as associations between household alcohol abuse (OR 1.53, 95% CI 1.31-1.79) and household mental illness (OR 1.29, 95% CI 1.04-1.60) with ever smoking. We find no evidence of association modification by gender, socioeconomic position or race/ethnicity. Instrumental variables analysis using a sibling's report of adverse childhood experiences demonstrated a relationship between household alcohol abuse and smoking, with a population attributable fraction of 17% (95% CI 2.0% to 37%) for ever smoking and 6.7% (95% CI 1.6% to 12%) for currently smoking.

Conclusions: Findings suggest long-term impacts of childhood exposure to physical abuse, household alcohol abuse and parental mental illness on obesity and smoking, and that the association between household alcohol abuse and smoking is not solely due to measurement error.

Bibliography Citation
Rehkopf, David, Irene Headen, Alan Hubbard, Julianna Deardorff, Yamini Kesavan, Alison K. Cohen, Divya Patil, Lorrene Ritchie and Barbara Abrams. "Adverse Childhood Experiences and Later Life Adult Obesity and Smoking in the United States." Annals of Epidemiology 26,7 (July 2016): 488-492.e5.