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Author: Pratt, Joanne H.
Resulting in 2 citations.
1. Pratt, Joanne H.
Counting the New Mobile Workforce
Report BTS97-A-01, U.S. Department of Transportation, Bureau of Transportation Statistics, April 1997.
Also: http://www.bts.gov/statpol/wrkforce.pdf
Cohort(s): Mature Women, NLSY79, Young Women
Publisher: Bureau of Transportation Statistics, U.S. Department of Transportation
Keyword(s): Current Population Survey (CPS) / CPS-Fertility Supplement; Labor Market Demographics; Labor Market Surveys; Longitudinal Data Sets; Longitudinal Surveys; Mobility, Labor Market; Self-Employed Workers; Survey of Income and Program Participation (SIPP); Work Hours

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The existing federal surveys that provide policy makers with the data needed to inform their decision-making were designed to monitor the employment and travel patterns of the Industrial Age. They were not designed to monitor the more fluid patterns of work times and locations that are characteristic of the information age.

The thrust of the study is to examine existing federal surveys in order to identify those to which work-at-home questions have been, or can be added in order to generate more reliable information about an increasingly mobile workforce. By this strategy, at little or no cost, new or revised questions can be added while maintaining the continuity of past years' data sets.

In adapting these surveys, the problem is to define "work," "home," and similar words that are commonly used in our language but which have acquired a plethora of associated meanings. The difficulty has not been resolved by the many new terms coined to describe non-traditional ways to work. The problem with words such as "telecommuting," "hoteling," "homebased business," and "mobile workers," is that they are not defined by objective criteria such as the hours worked and locations. To bypass this situation, we recommend phrasing questions in terms of measurable variables such as the place of work and the time in days and hours spent at each location. That approach leaves researchers the option of applying their own definitions that fit the context of their analyses.

About 20 questionnaires were examined to identify those to which work-at-home questions were relevant. During the period of the study, questions were added to the American Housing Survey, Nationwide Personal Transportation Survey, and to the Survey of Income and Program Participation. We propose new questions or rephrasing for the Current Population Survey, the 2000 Census, the Health and Retirement Survey, National Educational Longitudinal Study, National Household Education Survey, and the Panel Study of Income Dynamics. Further, we recommend continuing the topic of work at home in those surveys to which questions had previously been added such as the Characteristics of Business Owners, the National Longitudinal Surveys, and the National Survey of Families and Households.

In addition, a set of core questions with four levels of priority is recommended for consideration in designing future surveys.

Bibliography Citation
Pratt, Joanne H. "Counting the New Mobile Workforce." Report BTS97-A-01, U.S. Department of Transportation, Bureau of Transportation Statistics, April 1997.
2. Pratt, Joanne H.
Myths and Realities of Working at Home: Characteristics of Homebased Business Owners and Telecommuters
Small Business Research Summary 134, Joanne H. Pratt Associates, Dallas TX, March 1993.
Also: http://www.sba.gov/advo/research/rs134.html
Cohort(s): Mature Women, NLSY79, Young Women
Publisher: Joanne H. Pratt Associates
Keyword(s): Earnings; Occupations; Private Sector; Self-Employed Workers; Small Business (Owner/Employer)

This project was carried our for the Office of Advocacy, United States Small Business Administration under contract SBA-6647-OA-91. Home was always a place to work until the industrial age. When manufacturing tools became too big and expensive to use at home, people moved off farms to work in factories. In today's information age, technology is providing people with a "virtual office" -- which permits them to work wherever they are. This study shows that one of the places that people work is in the home. The goal of this study is to describe quantitatively, the reality of work at home. Earnings, age, time spent, and satisfaction of young men and women who operate a homebased business are compared. The findings also dispel the fears of employers that employees cannot be trusted to work at home and the concerns that homebased work exploits employees. Telecommuters closely resemble non-telecommuters in their work habits. Three NLS cohorts are analyzed for this study: 1988 surveys of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY) (men and women ages 23 to 30) and Young Women (women ages 34 to 44), and the 1989 survey of Mature Women (women ages 52 to 66). Four labor market categories of each cohort are examined: self-employed 1) homebased business owners and 2) non-homebased business owners; and wage and salary 3) telecommuters and 4) non-telecommuters.
Bibliography Citation
Pratt, Joanne H. "Myths and Realities of Working at Home: Characteristics of Homebased Business Owners and Telecommuters." Small Business Research Summary 134, Joanne H. Pratt Associates, Dallas TX, March 1993.