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Author: Reynolds, C. Lockwood
Resulting in 3 citations.
1. Johnson, Eric
Reynolds, C. Lockwood
The Effect of Household Hospitalizations on the Educational Attainment of Youth
Economics of Education Review 37 (December 2013): 165-182.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0272775713001271
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): College Graduates; Dropouts; Educational Attainment; Gender Differences; High School Completion/Graduates; Hospitalization; Household Influences

We utilize data from the NLSY97 to investigate the effect of week-long hospitalizations of household members on the educational attainment of youth. These significant household health events could result in a combination of financial and time constraints on the household, limiting the educational opportunities available to survey respondents. We find that household hospitalizations lead to reductions in the likelihood of completing high school, attending college and completing a bachelor's degree. These negative effects are disproportionately experienced by male respondents. Respondents with higher pre-hospitalization ability appear to be insulated from these health events. Birth-order and the gender composition of siblings also appear to play a role. We find that the oldest children in the household bear the burden of a hospitalization, substantially lowering the educational attainment of these respondents, while insulating their younger siblings. Similarly, the presence of a brother appears to insulate respondents from the negative impacts of household hospitalizations.
Bibliography Citation
Johnson, Eric and C. Lockwood Reynolds. "The Effect of Household Hospitalizations on the Educational Attainment of Youth." Economics of Education Review 37 (December 2013): 165-182.
2. Lovenheim, Michael F.
Reynolds, C. Lockwood
Changes in Postsecondary Choices by Ability and Income: Evidence from the National Longitudinal Surveys of Youth
Journal of Human Capital 5,1 (Spring 2011): 70-109.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/pss/10.1086/660123
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY97
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
Keyword(s): Armed Forces Qualifications Test (AFQT); College Education; Gender Differences; High School Completion/Graduates; Higher Education; Income Level

We characterize changes over time in the choices high school graduates make concerning 2-year attendance, 4-year attendance, and college nonattendance across the joint income and ability distribution. We find that college nonattendance decreased substantially between cohorts for both men and women and that these declines were larger for higher-ability students. On the 2-year/4-year margin, there is evidence of growing ability constraints among women. Furthermore, income has become more important among higher-ability men, and increases in 2-year attendance among high-ability but low-income men come at the expense of 4-year college enrollment. State-level college costs explain little of the changes we document.
Bibliography Citation
Lovenheim, Michael F. and C. Lockwood Reynolds. "Changes in Postsecondary Choices by Ability and Income: Evidence from the National Longitudinal Surveys of Youth." Journal of Human Capital 5,1 (Spring 2011): 70-109.
3. Lovenheim, Michael F.
Reynolds, C. Lockwood
The Effect of Housing Wealth on College Choice: Evidence from the Housing Boom
NBER Working Paper No. 18075, National Bureau of Economic Research, May 2012.
Also: http://www.nber.org/papers/w18075
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)
Keyword(s): Assets; College Characteristics; College Enrollment; Colleges; Wealth

The higher education system in the United States is characterized by a large degree of quality heterogeneity, and there is a growing literature suggesting students attending higher quality universities have better educational and labor market outcomes. In this paper, we use NLSY97 data combined with the difference in the timing and strength of the housing boom across cities to examine how short-run home price growth affects the quality of postsecondary schools chosen by students. Our findings indicate a $10,000 increase in a family’s housing wealth in the four years prior to a student becoming of college-age increases the likelihood she attends a flagship public university relative to a non-flagship public university by 2.0 percent and decreases the relative probability of attending a community college by 1.6 percent. These effects are driven by relatively lower and middle-income families. We show that these changes are due to the effect of housing wealth on where students apply, not on whether they are admitted. We also find that short-run increases in home prices lead to increases in direct quality measures of the institutions students attend. Finally, for the lower-income sample, we find home price increases reduce student labor supply and that each $10,000 increase in home prices is associated with a 1.8% increase in the likelihood of completing college.
Bibliography Citation
Lovenheim, Michael F. and C. Lockwood Reynolds. "The Effect of Housing Wealth on College Choice: Evidence from the Housing Boom." NBER Working Paper No. 18075, National Bureau of Economic Research, May 2012.