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Author: Robertson, John George
Resulting in 2 citations.
1. Robertson, John George
Are Young Noncustodial Fathers Left Behind in the Labor Market?
Ph.D. Dissertation, Columbia University, 1995
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: UMI - University Microfilms, Bell and Howell Information and Learning
Keyword(s): Alcohol Use; Armed Forces Qualifications Test (AFQT); Drug Use; Education; Employment; Fatherhood; Fathers; Health Factors; Human Capital; Human Capital Theory; Labor Supply; Marital Status; Parents, Non-Custodial; Parents, Single; Wage Rates

Are Young Noncustodial Fathers Left Behind in the Labor Market? The Study uses the 1990 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY) for employment and earnings history and the NLSY for years 1982 to 1990 to establish father and marital status. The NLSY, a random sample of the U.S. population in 1979, has 5112 male respondents in 1990 between the ages of 25 to 32 years. First earnings are decomposed into the effects of working at all, hours worked, and the wage rate. Labor supply and human capital theory are used to understand the factors that account for differences in earnings between noncustodial fathers, custodial fathers and men without children. Custodial fathers earn 65% more and men without children earn 36% more than noncustodial fathers. Noncustodial fathers' lower wages are accounted for by lower levels of education and accumulated experience as well as lower scores on the Armed Service Qualification (AFQT) test. Noncustodial fathers are less likely to work and, when they worked, worked fewer hours in the year than custodial fathers. While the wage, unearned income, marriage premium, health problems, and use of drugs and alcohol account for some of the difference in hours worked, some difference in work effort remains to be explained. Dissertation Aabstracts International, VOL. 56-11A, Page 4557
Bibliography Citation
Robertson, John George. Are Young Noncustodial Fathers Left Behind in the Labor Market? Ph.D. Dissertation, Columbia University, 1995.
2. Robertson, John George
Young Residential Fathers Have Lower Earnings: Implications for Child Support Enforcement
Social Work Research 21,4 (December 1997): 211-223
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: National Association of Social Workers (NASW)
Keyword(s): Child Support; Earnings; Education; Fathers, Absence; Fathers, Presence; Job Training; Male Sample; Work Hours

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The study reported here used data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth to compare the earnings and work efforts of young nonresidential fathers, residential fathers, and men without children. It found that nonresidential fathers earned less, had lower hourly wages, and worked fewer hours than the other groups of men, primarily because of lower levels of education and job training. These findings lead to the conclusion that obtaining sufficient child support payments from nonresidential fathers will require more than strengthening the enforcement of child support laws. Policy initiatives that foster greater educational and employment opportunities are required. ((c) 1998 APA/PsycINFO, all rights reserved):
Bibliography Citation
Robertson, John George. "Young Residential Fathers Have Lower Earnings: Implications for Child Support Enforcement." Social Work Research 21,4 (December 1997): 211-223.