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Author: Sherry, Bettylou
Resulting in 1 citation.
1. Faith, Myles S.
Heshka, Stanley
Keller, Kathleen, L.
Sherry, Bettylou
Matz, Patty E.
Pietrobelli, Angelo
Allison, David B.
Maternal-Child Feeding Patterns and Child Body Weight: Findings from a Population-Based Sample
Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine 157,9 (September 2003): 926-932.
Also: http://archpedi.ama-assn.org/cgi/content/full/157/9/919
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: American Medical Association
Keyword(s): Body Mass Index (BMI); Child Health; Children, Behavioral Development; Ethnic Differences; Hispanics; Nutritional Status/Nutrition/Consumption Behaviors; Obesity; Racial Differences; Weight

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Objective: Certain mother-child feeding patterns (MCFPs) may promote childhood obesity and/or disordered eating. The objectives of this study were to assess the demographic correlates of select MCFPs and to test whether differences in these MCFPs are associated with child body mass index (BMI: kg/m2) z-scores in a population-based study.

Design: A secondary analysis of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY) Main and Child Cohorts was conducted on more than 1,000 Hispanic, African American, and non-Hispanic/non-African American? (NHNAA) children, aged 3?6 years. MCFPs were measured by three interview questions probing mother-allotted child food choice, child compliance during meals, and child obedience during meals.

Results: Mothers of NHNAA children allotted greater food choice than mothers of African American or Hispanic children. Maternal BMI and other demographic measures were unrelated to MCFPs. The lowest levels of mother-allotted child food choice and child eating compliance were associated with reduced child BMI, with mean BMI z-scores = -.36 and -.41 respectively. Effect sizes were small, however, and MCFPs did not discriminate children who were overweight or at-risk for overweight from children who were not (p> .05).

Conclusions: Feeding strategies providing the least child food choice were associated with reduced child BMI. However, feeding relations did not relate to child overweight status.

Bibliography Citation
Faith, Myles S., Stanley Heshka, Kathleen Keller, Bettylou Sherry, Patty E. Matz, Angelo Pietrobelli and David B. Allison. "Maternal-Child Feeding Patterns and Child Body Weight: Findings from a Population-Based Sample." Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine 157,9 (September 2003): 926-932.