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Author: Sweeney, Megan Mcdonnell
Resulting in 5 citations.
1. Sweeney, Megan Mcdonnell
Gender, Race, and Changing Families: the Shifting Economic Foundations of Marriage
Ph.D. Dissertation, The University of Wisconsin – Madison, 1998. DAI-A 59/09, p. 3663, Mar 1999
Cohort(s): NLSY79, Older Men, Young Men
Publisher: UMI - University Microfilms, Bell and Howell Information and Learning
Keyword(s): Economics of Gender; Gender Differences; Marriage; Occupational Attainment; Racial Differences; Women's Roles; Women's Studies

Given dramatic changes in the labor market positions of women and men, gender role attitudes, and consumption patterns that have occurred during the past thirty years, it is expected that the relationship between economic prospects and entry into first marriage will have shifted both for women and for men. In general, we would expect some increase over time in the importance of female economic prospects for marriage and some decline in the importance of male economic prospects resulting from these trends. Yet many important theories of marriage in the social sciences--particularly the work of Gary Becker--assume marriage is based on the economic specialization of spouses and suggest that women's improving economic prospects will make marriage less desirable. This perspective on marriage has influenced a large and diverse group of social scientists who attribute recent declines in marriage to improvements in women's labor market position. This dissertation questions the appropriateness of the assumptions underlying this view for contemporary patterns of marriage. Through an investigation of the changing relationship between economic prospects and entry into first marriage for two recent cohorts of young adults in the National Longitudinal Surveys of Labor Market Experience, this research investigates the possibility that the influence of economic factors on marriage has shifted in recent decades. This project further improves upon the conceptualizations of economic prospects used in previous studies of marriage by investigating the impact of future earnings expectations and uncertainty on the marriage process. Because the effects of economic prospects on marriage may change with age, special attention is also focused on how the effects of economic prospects on marriage change both over historical time and over the life course of individuals. Racial and gender differences in the association between economic prospects and marriage are also investigated.
Bibliography Citation
Sweeney, Megan Mcdonnell. Gender, Race, and Changing Families: the Shifting Economic Foundations of Marriage. Ph.D. Dissertation, The University of Wisconsin – Madison, 1998. DAI-A 59/09, p. 3663, Mar 1999.
2. Sweeney, Megan Mcdonnell
Two Decades of Family Change: The Shifting Economic Foundations of Marriage
American Sociological Review 67,1 (February 2002): 132-147.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3088937
Cohort(s): NLSY79, Young Men, Young Women
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Earnings; Economic Changes/Recession; Family Structure; Gender Differences; Marriage; Oppenheimer's Model; Racial Differences

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Has the relationship between economic prospects and marriage formation in the United States changed in recent decades? To answer this question, a discrete-time event-history analysis was conducted using data from multiple cohorts of the National Longitudinal Surveys of Labor Market Experience. Among women, results indicate growth in the importance of earnings for marriage formation between the early baby-boom cohort (born between 1950 and 1954) and late baby-boom cohort (born between 1961 and 1965). Evidence of cohort change in the relationship between men's economic prospects and marriage, however, is limited. Despite important racial differences in the economic and attitudinal context of marriage, key results are generally similar for whites and for African Americans. Taken together, these findings imply that men and women are growing to resemble one another with respect to the relationship between economic prospects and marriage, although this convergence is driven primarily by changing patterns of marriage among women. These results are largely supportive of Oppenheimer's career-entry theory of marriage and suggest that Becker's specialization and trading model of marriage may be outdated.
Bibliography Citation
Sweeney, Megan Mcdonnell. "Two Decades of Family Change: The Shifting Economic Foundations of Marriage." American Sociological Review 67,1 (February 2002): 132-147.
3. Sweeney, Megan Mcdonnell
Women, Men, and Changing Families: The Shifting Economic Foundations of Marriage
Presented: Washington, DC, Population Association of America Meetings, March 1997
Cohort(s): NLSY79, Young Men, Young Women
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Economics of Gender; Employment; Family Circumstances, Changes in; Family Models; Family Studies; Gender Differences; Marriage; Modeling, Hazard/Event History/Survival/Duration; Racial Differences

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The purpose of this paper is to understand how the relationship between economic prospects and marriage may have changed over the last few decades, with an emphasis on exploring the potential differences between men and women. Given great change in the economic context in which men and women make decisions about relationships since the late 1960s, it is expected that the correlates of marriage may have shifted. This paper uses discrete-time hazard models to analyze data from multiple cohorts of the National Longitudinal Surveys (young women, young men, and youth samples). The effects of economic and employment characteristics on entry into first marriage are compared for 'early' and 'late' baby boom cohorts of men and women. Particular attention is paid to how these effects may have changed differently for blacks and whites.
Bibliography Citation
Sweeney, Megan Mcdonnell. "Women, Men, and Changing Families: The Shifting Economic Foundations of Marriage." Presented: Washington, DC, Population Association of America Meetings, March 1997.
4. Sweeney, Megan Mcdonnell
Women, Men, and Changing Families: The Shifting Economic Foundations of Marriage
CDE Working Paper No. 97-14, Center for Demography and Ecology, Madison WI, November 1997.
Also: http://www.ssc.wisc.edu:80/cde/cdewp/97-14ab.htm
Cohort(s): NLSY79, Young Men, Young Women
Publisher: Center for Demography and Ecology
Keyword(s): Economic Changes/Recession; Economics, Demographic; Family Circumstances, Changes in; Gender Differences; Marriage; Modeling, Hazard/Event History/Survival/Duration; Racial Differences

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Based on data from multiple cohorts of the National Longitudinal Survey of Labor Market Experience (NLS), this study uses continuous-time proportional hazard models to investigate whether the relationship between economic prospects and entry into first marriage has changed in recent decades. Results indicate substantial change in marriage patterns between the early and late baby-boom cohorts. While women's economic prospects have become more important for marriage formation over time, men's economic prospects have generally become less important. In contrast to theories linking women's economic independence to declines in marriage, economic prospects are positively related to marriage of both men and women in the later cohort. These findings imply, with respect to the relationship between economic prospects and marriage, that men and women are increasingly coming to resemble one another. Results are somewhat less conclusive for blacks than for whites.
Bibliography Citation
Sweeney, Megan Mcdonnell. "Women, Men, and Changing Families: The Shifting Economic Foundations of Marriage." CDE Working Paper No. 97-14, Center for Demography and Ecology, Madison WI, November 1997.
5. Sweeney, Megan Mcdonnell
Cancian, Maria
The Changing Importance of White Women's Economic Prospects for Assortative Mating
Journal of Marriage and Family 66,4 (November 2004): 1015-1029.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.0022-2445.2004.00073.x/pdf
Cohort(s): NLSY79, Young Women
Publisher: National Council on Family Relations
Keyword(s): Economics of Gender; Labor Force Participation; Marriage; Socioeconomic Factors; Wages, Women

Given recent changes in the labor force participation and economic standing of women, we ask whether a woman's position in the labor market has become a more important determinant of her position in the marriage market. Unlike much prior research on trends over time in assortative mating, we take an individual-level approach to the analysis and rely on improved measures of labor market position, such as measuring wives' wages before marriage and considering multiple indicators of husbands' longer term economic standing. Our analysis relies on data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Young Women (N= 759) and the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (N= 767). Our results are consistent with growth over time in the importance of women's earnings potential in determining their marriage prospects. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
Bibliography Citation
Sweeney, Megan Mcdonnell and Maria Cancian. "The Changing Importance of White Women's Economic Prospects for Assortative Mating." Journal of Marriage and Family 66,4 (November 2004): 1015-1029.