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Author: Zhang, Weihui
Resulting in 2 citations.
1. Huang, Ying
Zhang, Weihui
The Earning of Immigrant Young Adults: Analysis Within and Across Cohorts
Presented: Washington DC, Association for Public Policy Analysis and Management (APPAM) Annual Fall Research Conference, November 2016
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Association for Public Policy Analysis and Management (APPAM)
Keyword(s): Earnings; Immigrants; National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (AddHealth)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

In this study, we use two nationally representative cohorts--the National Longitudinal Study of Youth (NLSY79) and the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (Add Health)--to examine the effects of generation and duration of residence on their earnings in the first few years upon their entrance of labor market. We exploit the cohort design of these two data sources to investigate the role of compositional changes (at micro-level) and structural changes (at the macro-level) play in affecting the economic achievement of immigrant youth and young adults, the second generation immigrants, and their native peers. Our approach to immigrants' economic attainment is guided by contemporary discussions of policies on immigration and immigrants in the United States. Our goal is to provide a greater understanding of how immigrant and second-generation youths progress through the initial stages of the labor market experience.
Bibliography Citation
Huang, Ying and Weihui Zhang. "The Earning of Immigrant Young Adults: Analysis Within and Across Cohorts." Presented: Washington DC, Association for Public Policy Analysis and Management (APPAM) Annual Fall Research Conference, November 2016.
2. Zhang, Weihui
Yang, Tse-Chuan
Maternal Smoking and Infant Low Birth Weight: Exploring the Biological Mechanism Through the Mother's Pre-pregnancy Weight Status
Population Research and Policy Review published online (12 October 2019): DOI: 10.1007/s11113-019-09554-x.
Also: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11113-019-09554-x
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Birthweight; Mothers, Health; Pre/post Natal Behavior; Smoking (see Cigarette Use); Weight

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Maternal smoking has been found to adversely affect birth outcomes, such as increasing the odds of having low birth weight infants. However, the mechanisms explaining how a mother's smoking is linked to a child's low birth weight status are underexplored. This study merged two nationally representative datasets in the United States (US)--the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 (NLSY79) and the NLSY79 Child and Young Adult (NLSYCYA)--to examine whether maternal weight status before pregnancy serves as a biological mechanism. We applied a recently developed mediation analysis technique to a data sample of 6550 mother-child pairs, and we compared the estimated coefficients across nested probability models. We found that maternal body mass index (BMI) (in kg/m2), a widely used measure of weight status, reduces the odds of delivering a low birth weight infant, and this mechanism explains about 10.2% of the adverse impact of maternal smoking on having a low birth weight child. Moreover, when categorizing maternal pre-pregnancy BMI into four weight statuses (i.e., underweight, normal weight, overweight, and obese), we found that, in contrast to mothers with normal weight status, underweight mothers are 70% more likely to have a low birth weight child. Our findings suggest that maternal weight status plays a role in understanding how maternal smoking affects low birth weight outcome, indicating that maintaining a proper weight status for women who plan to give birth may be a possible policy to promote infant health.
Bibliography Citation
Zhang, Weihui and Tse-Chuan Yang. "Maternal Smoking and Infant Low Birth Weight: Exploring the Biological Mechanism Through the Mother's Pre-pregnancy Weight Status." Population Research and Policy Review published online (12 October 2019): DOI: 10.1007/s11113-019-09554-x.