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Source: Department of Sociology, University of California, Los Angeles
Resulting in 2 citations.
1. Kofman, Yelizavetta
The Hidden Social Costs of Precarious Employment: Parental Co-Residence, Marriage Timing, and Political Participation During Young Adulthood
Ph.D. Dissertation, Department of Sociology, University of California, Los Angeles, 2015
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Department of Sociology, University of California, Los Angeles
Keyword(s): Employment, Intermittent; Marital Status; Political Attitudes/Behaviors/Efficacy; Residence, Return to Parental Home/Delayed Homeleaving

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Precarious employment--that is, jobs that entail a nonstandard contract, are short term, and/or do not provide fringe benefits like health insurance and retirement savings--has become a widely discussed topic in the media and a key research topic among scholars. Despite increasing scholarly and public interest in precarious employment, however, few studies have considered the effects of such employment beyond typical work and career outcomes. Using longitudinal panel data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997, this study examines the effect of precarious employment on the social and political lives of contemporary young adults.
Bibliography Citation
Kofman, Yelizavetta. The Hidden Social Costs of Precarious Employment: Parental Co-Residence, Marriage Timing, and Political Participation During Young Adulthood. Ph.D. Dissertation, Department of Sociology, University of California, Los Angeles, 2015.
2. Schwartz, Christine R.
Educational Homogamy in Marital and Cohabiting Unions: A Test of the Double Selection Hypothesis
Working Paper, Department of Sociology, University of California - Los Angeles, August 2004.
Also: http://www.iuperj.br/rc28/papers/schwartz_rc282004_final.pdf
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Department of Sociology, University of California, Los Angeles
Keyword(s): Cohabitation; Education; Marriage

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study uses log-linear models and data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY79) to compare the odds of educational homogamy in marriage and cohabitation. I find that differences in the educational resemblance of married and cohabiting couples vary considerably depending on the sample used and the point at which assortative mating patterns are measured. Cohabiting couples are much less likely to be educationally homogamous than married couples using a sample of prevailing unions. Restricting the sample to newly formed unions, however, largely eliminates this difference. Nevertheless, I find support for the hypothesis that couples who enter marriage via cohabitation are 'doubly selected' and are more homogamous than cohabiting couples who split up. I find no difference in the educational resemblance of couples whose marriages are preceded by cohabitation and those marry without first cohabiting.
Bibliography Citation
Schwartz, Christine R. "Educational Homogamy in Marital and Cohabiting Unions: A Test of the Double Selection Hypothesis." Working Paper, Department of Sociology, University of California - Los Angeles, August 2004.