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Source: Economics Bulletin
Resulting in 4 citations.
1. Chatterjee, Swarnankur
Health Insurance Coverage and the Role Of Income Uncertainty
Economics Bulletin 29, 2 (3 June 2009): 1254-1262.
Also: http://www.accessecon.com/Pubs/EB/2009/Volume29/EB-09-V29-I2-P70.pdf
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Economics Bulletin
Keyword(s): Benefits, Insurance; Educational Attainment; Income; Insurance, Health

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This paper uses the National Longitudinal Survey data set to examine the role of income uncertainty in explaining the likelihood of health insurance coverage among individuals. After controlling for a number of socioeconomic, demographic, and behavioral factors, the results suggest that individuals who face greater income uncertainty are less likely to have health insurance coverage. Additionally, the likelihood of health insurance coverage increases with income and educational attainment.
Bibliography Citation
Chatterjee, Swarnankur. "Health Insurance Coverage and the Role Of Income Uncertainty." Economics Bulletin 29, 2 (3 June 2009): 1254-1262.
2. Debeaumont, Ronald
Nsiah, Christian
Do Unions Reduce the Wage Penalty Experienced by Obese Women?
Economics Bulletin 36,1 (2016): 281-290.
Also: http://econpapers.repec.org/article/eblecbull/eb-14-00865.htm
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Economics Bulletin
Keyword(s): Collective Bargaining; Obesity; Unions; Wage Penalty/Career Penalty; Weight

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Unions have been shown to reduce wage inequality, thus resulting in higher wages for certain disadvantaged groups. Overweight individuals, especially women, generally receive lower wages than thinner individuals with similar socioeconomic characteristics. This paper demonstrates that union wage protection extends to overweight women in the U.S. Specifically, obese women do not experience a wage penalty when employed in jobs covered by collective bargaining.
Bibliography Citation
Debeaumont, Ronald and Christian Nsiah. "Do Unions Reduce the Wage Penalty Experienced by Obese Women?" Economics Bulletin 36,1 (2016): 281-290.
3. Kosovich, Stephen M.
How do firms interpret a job loss? Evidence from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth NLSY79
Economics Bulletin 29,2 (19 May 2009):1086-1100
Also: http://www.accessecon.com/Pubs/EB/2009/Volume29/EB-09-V29-I2-P55.pdf
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Economics Bulletin
Keyword(s): Displaced Workers; Job Turnover; Layoffs; Modeling, Probit

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Empirical studies in the job displacement literature have found that workers face significant earnings losses on average, when they are permanently displaced from jobs. Previous research also suggests that the costliness of job loss varies widely. Gibbons and Katz (1991) develop and test a theoretical model in which layoffs provide the market with information concerning the quality of laid off workers, while plant and firm closings do not. Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, this paper tests a model that describes how firms can use additional information about job losses to determine worker quality. The results suggest that workers face the most stigma from very recent and uncommon job losses.
Bibliography Citation
Kosovich, Stephen M. "How do firms interpret a job loss? Evidence from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth NLSY79." Economics Bulletin 29,2 (19 May 2009):1086-1100.
4. Zagorsky, Jay L.
Are Blondes Really Dumb?
Economics Bulletin 36,1 (2016): 401-410.
Also: http://econpapers.repec.org/scripts/search.pl?ft=blondes
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Economics Bulletin
Keyword(s): Armed Forces Qualifications Test (AFQT); I.Q.; Physical Characteristics

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Discrimination based on appearance has serious economic consequences. Women with blonde hair are often considered beautiful, but dumb, which is a potentially harmful stereotype since many employers seek intelligent workers. Using the NLSY79, a large nationally representative survey tracking young baby boomers, this research analyzes the IQ of white women and men according to hair color. Blonde women have a higher mean IQ than women with brown, red and black hair. Blondes are more likely classified as geniuses and less likely to have extremely low IQ than women with other hair colors, suggesting the dumb blonde stereotype is a myth.
Bibliography Citation
Zagorsky, Jay L. "Are Blondes Really Dumb?" Economics Bulletin 36,1 (2016): 401-410.