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Source: Management Science
Resulting in 2 citations.
1. Addoum, Jawad M.
Korniotis, George M.
Kumar, Alok
Stature, Obesity, and Portfolio Choice
Management Science 63,10 (October 2017): 3393-3413.
Also: https://doi.org/10.1287/mnsc.2016.2508
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences
Keyword(s): Assets; Cross-national Analysis; Financial Behaviors/Decisions; Financial Investments; Health and Retirement Study (HRS); Height; Obesity

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Using multiple U.S. and European data sources, we show that observed physical attributes are related to participation in financial markets. Specifically, we find that individuals who are relatively tall and of normal weight are more likely to hold stocks in their financial portfolios. We consider several potential mechanisms that could drive the relation between physical attributes and portfolio decisions. We find that teenage social experiences as well as genetic and prenatal endowments that are fixed at birth are the two channels through which height affects financial decisions. Furthermore, we find that the relation between body mass index and portfolio decisions is largely driven by education and race.
Bibliography Citation
Addoum, Jawad M., George M. Korniotis and Alok Kumar. "Stature, Obesity, and Portfolio Choice." Management Science 63,10 (October 2017): 3393-3413.
2. Segal, Carmit
Working When No One Is Watching: Motivation, Test Scores, and Economic Success
Management Science 58,8 (August 2012): 1438-1457.
Also: http://pubsonline.informs.org/doi/abs/10.1287/mnsc.1110.1509
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences
Keyword(s): Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB); Earnings; Economic Well-Being; Motivation; Personality/Big Five Factor Model or Traits; Test Scores/Test theory/IRT; Tests and Testing

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This paper provides evidence that scores on simple, low-stakes tests are associated with future economic success because the scores also reflect test takers' personality traits associated with their level of intrinsic motivation. To establish this, I use the coding speed test that was administered without incentives to participants in the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY). I show that, controlling for cognitive ability, the coding speed scores are correlated with future earnings of male NLSY participants. I provide evidence that the coding speed scores relate to intrinsic motivation. I show that the scores of the highly motivated, though less educated, group (potential recruits to the U.S. military), are higher than the NLSY participants' scores. I use controlled experiments to show directly that intrinsic motivation is an important component of the unincentivized coding speed scores and that it relates to test takers' personality traits.
Bibliography Citation
Segal, Carmit. "Working When No One Is Watching: Motivation, Test Scores, and Economic Success." Management Science 58,8 (August 2012): 1438-1457.