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Source: Sex Roles
Resulting in 2 citations.
1. Baird, Chardie L.
Importance of Community Context for Young Women's Occupational Aspirations
Sex Roles 58,3-4 (February 2008): 208-221
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Career Patterns; Modeling; Occupational Aspirations; Women

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The effects of community context on occupational aspirations are examined in a national sample of young women in high school in the USA in 1979 (n = 2,210). Multilevel statistical models indicate that young women living in counties with a lower divorce rate, a lower percentage of women working, and more people employed in the wholesale and retail industrial sector tended to be less likely to aspire to paid work than young women living in areas with a higher divorce rate, a higher percentage of women working, and fewer people employed in the wholesale and retail industrial sector. Community context does not affect the level of young women's occupational aspirations as predicted by prior scholarship.

An earlier version of this paper was presented at the 2006 Southern Sociological Society Annual Meetings.

Bibliography Citation
Baird, Chardie L. "Importance of Community Context for Young Women's Occupational Aspirations." Sex Roles 58,3-4 (February 2008): 208-221.
2. Kramer, Karen
Pak, Sunjin
Relative Earnings and Depressive Symptoms among Working Parents: Gender Differences in the Effect of Relative Income on Depressive Symptoms
Sex Roles 78, 11-12 (June 2018): 744-759.
Also: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11199-017-0848-6
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Depression (see also CESD); Family Income; Fathers; Gender Attitudes/Roles; Gender Differences; Modeling, Structural Equation; Mothers

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The relationship between income and psychological well-being is well established. Yet, most of this research is conducted at the individual level without taking into account the role played by relative earnings at the couple level. In the present study we estimate the effect of share of family income on depressive symptoms of individuals. Specifically, we examine whether within-person change in the share of family income has differential effects on the level of depressive symptoms of mothers and fathers. Using data from the U.S. National Longitudinal Surveys of Youth (NLSY79), we follow the same individuals over 4 years and analyze their data using a cross-lagged structural equation model. Controlling for net income, we find that an increase in one's share of family income is related to an increased level of depressive symptoms among mothers and a decreased level of depressive symptoms among fathers. When looking at a subsample of stay-at-home parents, we find that a change from providing some share of the family income to stay-at-home parent status over time is related to higher level of depressive symptoms among fathers but not mothers. Furthermore, we find that egalitarian gender ideology moderates this relationship for mothers but not for fathers. We discuss potential implications of our findings to the work-family and gender literature and to counselors and therapists who specialize in treating depression.
Bibliography Citation
Kramer, Karen and Sunjin Pak. "Relative Earnings and Depressive Symptoms among Working Parents: Gender Differences in the Effect of Relative Income on Depressive Symptoms." Sex Roles 78, 11-12 (June 2018): 744-759.