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Source: Social Security Bulletin
Resulting in 6 citations.
1. Chirikos, Thomas N.
Nestel, Gilbert
Functional Capacities of Older Men for Extended Work Lives
Special Report, Social Security Administration, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 1988. Social Security Bulletin 52,8 (August 1989): 14-16
Cohort(s): Older Men
Publisher: Social Security Administration
Keyword(s): Disabled Workers; Health Factors; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Job Requirements; Markov chain / Markov model; Mortality; Occupations; Retirement

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The extent to which health conditions or physical job requirements affect the functional capacity of older men to remain at work is an important consideration in judging policies designed to advance the age of retirement. A continuous-time Markov model of retirement, disability and death is developed in this report to test hypotheses about the influence of impaired health and non-sedentary work on the ability of men in their seventh decade to delay retirement. The model is estimated with panel data covering a seventeen-year period for a nationally representative sample of older American men. Poor health is found to affect significantly the likelihood of retiring in a disabled state. Since the impairment status of the elderly may deteriorate over time as mortality rates improve, retirement policy must be braced for the very real possibility that the fraction of older workers who will have difficulty in delaying retirement because of their health problems will increase in the future. However, physical job requirements are found to play a slightly more ambiguous role in the ability of men to delay retirement. Workers in non-sedentary jobs are indeed more likely to retire disabled. But cohort projections of the fractions of men in various non-sedentary and sedentary job categories capable of extending their work lives are quite similar, even when differences in background characteristics of these men is taken into account. Thus, even though some workers will be adversely affected by advancing the age of retirement, this hardship is unlikely to fall disproportionately on only some small number of workers or those at work in specific types of jobs.
Bibliography Citation
Chirikos, Thomas N. and Gilbert Nestel. "Functional Capacities of Older Men for Extended Work Lives." Special Report, Social Security Administration, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 1988. Social Security Bulletin 52,8 (August 1989): 14-16.
2. Choudhury, Sharmila
Leonesio, Michael V.
Life-Cycle Aspects of Poverty Among Older Women
Social Security Bulletin 60,2 (Summer 1997): 17-36.
Also: ORES Working Paper Series Number 71, Office of Research, Evaluation, and Statistics, Social Security Administration, April 1997.
Cohort(s): Mature Women
Publisher: Social Security Administration
Keyword(s): Economic Well-Being; Economics of Gender; Life Cycle Research; Poverty; Socioeconomic Status (SES)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

In this paper we focus on the relationship between a woman's economic status earlier in life and her poverty status in old age. Previous research on the determinants of poverty among aged women has documented the socioeconomic and demographic correlates of the poor, and has examined the financial impact of adverse late-life events such as widowhood, deterioration of health, and loss of employment. Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Mature Women, we find that most women who experience these types of adverse events in their later years do not become poor and that a large majority of older NLSMW respondents who were poor in 1991-2 were poor earlier in their adult lives. Whether women are impoverished by adverse late-life events depends on their economic resources just prior to the event. But, the financial resources available in old age, in turn, depend very much on their long-term economic status throughout much of their adult lives. This article under scores the fact that for most older women these adverse events do not appear to precipitate poverty spells -- at least not within the first couple of years -- and directs attention at longer term circumstances that make some women more vulnerable.
Bibliography Citation
Choudhury, Sharmila and Michael V. Leonesio. "Life-Cycle Aspects of Poverty Among Older Women." Social Security Bulletin 60,2 (Summer 1997): 17-36.
3. Kingson, Eric R.
Health of Very Early Retirees
Social Security Bulletin 45,9 (September 1982): 3-9
Cohort(s): Older Men
Publisher: Social Security Administration
Keyword(s): Benefits, Insurance; Early Retirement; Health Factors; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Mortality; Retirees; Retirement; Social Security

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study examines the health of a sample representative of 1.8 million men aged 45-59 in l969 who permanently withdrew from the labor force before age 62 between l966-l975. The analysis concentrates on comparing the health of men receiving Social Security disability benefits with that of men reporting work-limiting health conditions at labor force withdrawal but not receiving Social Security disability benefits. The data suggest that the health of these groups is more similar than dissimilar.
Bibliography Citation
Kingson, Eric R. "Health of Very Early Retirees." Social Security Bulletin 45,9 (September 1982): 3-9.
4. Leonesio, Michael V.
The Economics of Retirement: A Nontechnical Guide
Social Security Bulletin 29,4 (Winter 1996): 29-50.
Also: http://www.socialsecurity.gov/policy/docs/ssb/v59n4/v59n4p29.pdf
Cohort(s): Older Men
Publisher: Social Security Administration
Keyword(s): Age and Ageing; Economic Changes/Recession; Retirement

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Concern about the economic consequences of the aging of the United States population has prompted considerable research activity during the past two decades. Economists have carefully examined retirement patterns and trends, and sought to identify and measure the determinants of the timing of retirement by older workers. Much of the published retirement research is fairly technical by nature and is somewhat inaccessible to nonspecialist audiences. This article provides a nontechnical overview of this research. In contrast to other reviews of the retirement literature, this exposition emphasizes the basic ideas and reasoning that economists use in their research. In the course of recounting how economists’ views about retirement have evolved in recent years, the article highlights landmark pieces of research, points out the specific advances made by the various researchers, and assesses what has been learned along the way.
Bibliography Citation
Leonesio, Michael V. "The Economics of Retirement: A Nontechnical Guide." Social Security Bulletin 29,4 (Winter 1996): 29-50.
5. Social Security Administration
Security for American's Children: a Report from the Annual Conference of the National Academy of Social Insurance; Part 2
Social Security Bulletin 55,2 (22 June 1992): 69-75
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Social Security Administration
Keyword(s): Behavioral Problems; Child Health; Child Support; Children; Family Background; Family Income; Health Care; Social Security; Test Scores/Test theory/IRT

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The health and economic security of children and their families were discussed by an array of experts at a January meeting of the National Academy of Social Insurance. This issure of the Social Security Bulletin contains summaries of the conference's five major presentations. Some of the topics include: how family income affects outcomes for children; whether the source of the family income matters; the effect family income on children's educational attainment; the dynamics of child support and its consequences on children; public and private programs that help to meet the Nation's economic and health care needs.
Bibliography Citation
Social Security Administration. "Security for American's Children: a Report from the Annual Conference of the National Academy of Social Insurance; Part 2." Social Security Bulletin 55,2 (22 June 1992): 69-75.
6. Weaver, David A.
Work and Retirement Decisions of Older Women: A Literature Review
Social Security Bulletin 57,1 (Spring 1994): 3-24.
Also: ORES Working Paper Series Number 61, Office of Research, Evaluation, and Statistics, Social Security Administration, May 1994
Cohort(s): Mature Women
Publisher: Social Security Administration
Keyword(s): Employment; Labor Force Participation; Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID); Retirement; Women

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This article presents summaries of 13 studies published 1980-94 that examined the impact of Old-Age Services and Disability Insurance program and other factors on older women's decision to work or retire. Data are from BLS; study data are from the Retirement History Study, the New Beneficiary Survey, the Panel Study of Income Dynamics, and the National Longitudinal Survey of Mature Women Tables show labor force participation rate for women aged 55 and older, by age and selected birth years 1915-1938.
Bibliography Citation
Weaver, David A. "Work and Retirement Decisions of Older Women: A Literature Review." Social Security Bulletin 57,1 (Spring 1994): 3-24.