Search Results

Author: Aughinbaugh, Alison Aileen
Resulting in 20 citations.
1. Aughinbaugh, Alison Aileen
Child Outcomes as Signals and the Receipt of Child Support
Ph.D. Dissertation, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 1998
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: UMI - University Microfilms, Bell and Howell Information and Learning
Keyword(s): Child Support; Educational Attainment; Endogeneity; Family Structure; Family Studies; Fertility; Heterogeneity; Parents, Non-Custodial; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading); Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test (PPVT)

Children from nonintact families achieve educational outcomes that are significantly lower than children from intact families. Empirical evidence suggests that the receipt of child support makes up for over half of this educational disadvantage. Moreover, previous work estimates that child support has benefits for the children that receive it that is several times greater than that of other dollars. This result would arise if (1) unobserved factors such as the noncustodian's altruism toward the child or the level of conflict between the parents are correlated with both the child support and child achievement outcomes or (2) noncustodial parents use child support strategically to influence custodians to invest more heavily in the children. This study considers both possibilities. Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY), this study evaluates the impact of child achievement on child support payments. The empirical model accounts for the endogeneity of family structure, fertility, measurement error in child achievement, and the quality of the information the noncustodian has about the child through a semiparametric, maximum likelihood framework. A discrete factor specification of unobserved heterogeneity links the child outcomes, the propensity that a woman and her child are eligible to receive child support, and the amount of child support received. The empirical results provide strong evidence that child achievement has a positive effect on both the receipt and amount of child support. This result is robust across various specifications and actually increases substantially with the inclusion of controls for the endogeneity of family structure and for the endogeneity and measurement error associated with the proxies for child achievement. This is the relationship predicted by a principal-agent model in which the noncustodial parent is unable to observe the resources devoted to the child by the custodian, but does observe a signal of those resources. The findings of this study improves our understanding of the links between child support and child achievement. It points out some low-cost policies that could increase the well-being of children in nonintact families. Consider, for example, a change in school policies to send report cards to noncustodial as well as custodial parents. This provides the noncustodian with more accurate information regarding the child's achievement. If the custodial parent recognizes that it is now easier for the noncustodian to monitor the resources devoted to the child, this policy may lead to increased investments in the child.
Bibliography Citation
Aughinbaugh, Alison Aileen. Child Outcomes as Signals and the Receipt of Child Support. Ph.D. Dissertation, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 1998.
2. Aughinbaugh, Alison Aileen
Does Head Start Yield Long-Term Benefits?
Journal of Human Resources 36,4 (Fall 2001): 641-665.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3069637
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: University of Wisconsin Press
Keyword(s): Head Start; Preschool Children; Program Participation/Evaluation; School Suspension/Expulsion; Test Scores/Test theory/IRT; Tests and Testing

Using a new data set, the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 (NLSY97), this paper examines the relationships between Head Start and school suspensions, grade retentions, and scores on math achievement tests. The body of previous work that has studied the effects of Head Start on child outcomes has examined relatively young children or small samples from compensatory preschool programs other than Head Start. Using the NLSY97 helps to remedy some of the data issues because it is a large nationally representative data set and contains outcomes up to the teenage years. The estimates indicate that Head Start participation does not have long-term benefits. This finding is compatible with past work showing that compensatory preschool programs that are long in duration and intensive are more likely to improve participants' outcomes.
Bibliography Citation
Aughinbaugh, Alison Aileen. "Does Head Start Yield Long-Term Benefits?" Journal of Human Resources 36,4 (Fall 2001): 641-665.
3. Aughinbaugh, Alison Aileen
Signals of Child Achievement as Determinants of Child Support
Presented: New Orleans, LA, American Economic Association Meeting, January 2001
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: American Economic Association
Keyword(s): Child Support; Family Income; Mothers, Income; Parents, Non-Custodial; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading); Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test (PPVT); Transfers, Financial; Transfers, Parental

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

For children from non-intact households, the receipt of an additional dollar of child support has been found to have benefits that are several times larger than those of mother's earnings or family income (John W. Graham et al., 1994; Virginia W. Knox, 1996; Laura M. Argys et al., 1998). The obvious explanation is that custodians who receive child support or noncustodians who pay child support differ from those who do not in unobserved ways. In this case, the child-support variable will pick up the effects of omitted variables with which it is correlated. Graham et al. (1994) and Knox (1996) attempt to correct for unobserved heterogeneity using instrumental variables. Their results show that the coefficient estimate on child-support income is much larger than that on family income. However, because of the imprecision of the estimates, one cannot conclude that child support has a benefit to children that is significantly larger than that of other income. This paper examines an alternative reason for the finding that child support has a larger impact on children than other dollars: child-support transfers and investments in children are strategically linked. A current payment of child support by a noncustodial parent (NCP) may depend on the past investments in the child by the custodial parent (CP). Because a NCP is unlikely to have complete information about investments in his child, he may use information about the child's achievement as a signal of how well the CP cares for the child. This would provide the CP with an incentive to invest more in the child than she would otherwise. This hypothesis is tested by estimating the effect of child achievement on the probability that a custodial parent receives child support and on the amount of child support received using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 Mother-Child Supplement. No previous estimation of child support has included measures of child achievement.
Bibliography Citation
Aughinbaugh, Alison Aileen. "Signals of Child Achievement as Determinants of Child Support." Presented: New Orleans, LA, American Economic Association Meeting, January 2001.
4. Aughinbaugh, Alison Aileen
The Effects of High School Math Curriculum on College Attendance: Evidence from the NLSY97
Economics of Education Review 31,6 (December 2012): 861-870.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0272775712000726?v=s5
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): College Characteristics; College Enrollment; High School Curriculum

Using a sample of youth who graduated from high school in the late 1990s and early 2000s, this paper examines the impact of high school math curriculum on the decision to go to college. Results that control for unobserved differences between students and their families suggest that a more rigorous high school math curriculum is associated with a higher probability of attending college and of attending a 4-year college. The household fixed effect results imply that students who take an advanced academic math curriculum in high school (algebra II or precalculus, trigonometry, or calculus) are about 17 percentage points more likely to go to college and 20 percentage points more likely to start college at a 4-year school by age 21 compared to those students whose highest math class was algebra I or geometry.
Bibliography Citation
Aughinbaugh, Alison Aileen. "The Effects of High School Math Curriculum on College Attendance: Evidence from the NLSY97." Economics of Education Review 31,6 (December 2012): 861-870.
5. Aughinbaugh, Alison Aileen
The Impact of Attrition on the Children of the NLSY79
Journal of Human Resources 39,2 (Spring 2004 ): 536-563.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3559026
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: University of Wisconsin Press
Keyword(s): Attrition; Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Behavioral Problems; Family Characteristics; Family Income; Marital Status; Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test (PPVT)

This paper examines the impact of attrition among the women of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 (NLSY79) and children in the NLSY79 Mother-Child Supplement (NLSY79-C). Attrition among the children is nonrandom with respect to mother's marital status, grandfather's completed schooling, and family income. These differences that are related to the probability of attrition do not appear to impact estimates of the effects of family income or maternal employment early in the child's life on either PPVT or BPI standard scores. However, the women who are not interviewed in any child-supplement year and the children for whom supplemental information is never collected appear to be the most disadvantaged. The omission of these children from the NLSY79-C may impact estimates of family characteristics on child outcomes, but because there are relatively few such children, the effects of their omission are likely to be small.
Bibliography Citation
Aughinbaugh, Alison Aileen. "The Impact of Attrition on the Children of the NLSY79." Journal of Human Resources 39,2 (Spring 2004 ): 536-563.
6. Aughinbaugh, Alison Aileen
Who Goes To College? Evidence From The NLSY97
Monthly Labor Review 131,8 (August 1, 2008): 33-43.
Also: http://www.bls.gov/opub/mlr/2008/08/art3abs.htm
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: U.S. Department of Labor
Keyword(s): College Education; Colleges; Ethnic Studies; Gender; High School Transcripts; Racial Studies

Estimates from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 show that sex, race, and ethnicity are unrelated to the student's decision to complete the first year of college, but are related to the decision to start college; high school grades, by contrast, affect both the decision to start college and the decision to stay in college for the first year. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
Bibliography Citation
Aughinbaugh, Alison Aileen. "Who Goes To College? Evidence From The NLSY97." Monthly Labor Review 131,8 (August 1, 2008): 33-43.
7. Aughinbaugh, Alison Aileen
Gardecki, Rosella M.
Attrition in the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997
Presented: Washington, DC, Bureau of Labor Statistics Conference Center, NLSY97 Tenth Anniversary Conference, May 29-30, 2008.
Also: http://www.fcsm.gov/07papers/Aughinbaugh.V-C.pdf
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: U.S. Department of Labor
Keyword(s): Attrition; Cigarette Use (see Smoking); Gender Differences; Nonresponse; Research Methodology; Sample Selection; Socioeconomic Status (SES)

This paper measures the level, the patterns, and the implications of attrition in the NLSY97. Much of the survey methodology literature considers participation in surveys as a multi-step process, where step 1 is establishing contact and step 2 involves gaining cooperation (Watson and Woods 2006). Because few NLSY97 sample members are unlocatable, however, we study attrition as a simple one-step process.

The first section of this paper describes the patterns of wave non-response, first attrition, and return in the NLSY97. The second section estimates (1) the probability of first attrition, and (2) among attritors, the probability of return in a subsequent round as functions of employment, schooling, and demographic events at the most recent interview thus we can assess whether certain groups of individuals (e.g. the unemployed, students, the married) are more likely to leave and return to the NLSY97. In the third section, we estimate quantile regressions in an attempt to examine whether attritors and returnees differ from those who remain in the survey with respect to the distribution of wage rates and total earnings. Lastly, we conclude by summarizing what the estimates presented here tell us about the nature and implications of attrition in the NLSY97.

Bibliography Citation
Aughinbaugh, Alison Aileen and Rosella M. Gardecki. "Attrition in the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997." Presented: Washington, DC, Bureau of Labor Statistics Conference Center, NLSY97 Tenth Anniversary Conference, May 29-30, 2008.
8. Aughinbaugh, Alison Aileen
Gittleman, Maury
Does Money Matter? A Comparison of the Effect of Income on Child Development in the United States and Great Britain
Presented: Washington, DC, Population Association of America Meetings, March 2001
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB); Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Britain, British; Child Development; Cross-national Analysis; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Motor and Social Development (MSD); NCDS - National Child Development Study (British); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading); Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test (PPVT); Verbal Memory (McCarthy Scale)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

An earlier version of this paper was presented in Ann Arbor, MI, Conference on "Cross-National Comparative Research Using Panel Surveys", October 2000

In this paper, we examine the effect of income on child development, as measured by scores on cognitive, behavior, and social assessments. Children's scores on various cognitive assessments have been shown to be related to success as adults. For instance, Currie and Thomas (1999) find that children's test scores at age seven are positively related to their employment and earnings as adults - even when a rich set of controls are included in the regressions. Consequently, addressing the question of whether higher levels of financial resources help children perform better on achievement tests may inform policies that aim to help children succeed as adults...Our results indicate that the relationship between income and test scores is, in fact, stronger in the US than in Great Britain when no other characteristics of the child or her family are taken into account. However, once controls for background characteristics and the mother's ability are included, the impact of income on child outcomes is very similar in the two countries. Our estimates of the effect of income on child outcomes are in line with those from previous studies that use US data: income has a positive and significant, but small effect on child development.

Bibliography Citation
Aughinbaugh, Alison Aileen and Maury Gittleman. "Does Money Matter? A Comparison of the Effect of Income on Child Development in the United States and Great Britain." Presented: Washington, DC, Population Association of America Meetings, March 2001.
9. Aughinbaugh, Alison Aileen
Gittleman, Maury
Does Money Matter? A Comparison of the Effect of Income on Child Development in the United States and Great Britain
Journal of Human Resources 38,2 (Spring 2003): 416-440.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1558750
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: University of Wisconsin Press
Keyword(s): Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB); Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Britain, British; Cross-national Analysis; Family Income; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Motor and Social Development (MSD); NCDS - National Child Development Study (British); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading); Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test (PPVT); Verbal Memory (McCarthy Scale)

In this paper, we examine the effect of income on child development in the United States and the United Kingdom, as measured by scores on cognitive, behavior, and social assessments. In line with previous results for the US we find that for both countries income generally has an effect on child development that is positive and significant, but whose size is small relative to other family background variables
Bibliography Citation
Aughinbaugh, Alison Aileen and Maury Gittleman. "Does Money Matter? A Comparison of the Effect of Income on Child Development in the United States and Great Britain." Journal of Human Resources 38,2 (Spring 2003): 416-440.
10. Aughinbaugh, Alison Aileen
Gittleman, Maury
Maternal Employment and Adolescent Risky Behavior
Presented: Atlanta, GA, Population Association of America Annual Meetings, May 2002
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Adolescent Behavior; Alcohol Use; Child Health; Cigarette Use (see Smoking); Crime; Drug Use; Maternal Employment; Modeling, Fixed Effects; Sexual Activity; Smoking (see Cigarette Use); Substance Use

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Previous examinations of the impact of maternal employment on children have usually focused on young children. In this study, we examine the relationship between maternal employment and risky behavior by adolescents using the NLSY79 Young Adult Supplement. We analyze the link between mothers' employment measured early in life and during adolescence and the decisions of children to smoke cigarettes, drink alcohol, use marijuana, and to engage in sexual activity. Characteristics of the mother that are not measured may affect both employment and her influence on the likelihood that the child engages in risky behaviors. Further, maternal employment will be tied to decisions such as those affecting marital status or spousal employment that may also influence or be influenced by child behavior. We explore three approaches to addressing these econometric issues: (1) inclusion of a wide range of controls for maternal characteristics, (2) instrumental variables, and (3) fixed effects.
Bibliography Citation
Aughinbaugh, Alison Aileen and Maury Gittleman. "Maternal Employment and Adolescent Risky Behavior." Presented: Atlanta, GA, Population Association of America Annual Meetings, May 2002.
11. Aughinbaugh, Alison Aileen
Gittleman, Maury
Maternal Employment and Adolescent Risky Behavior
Working Paper No. 366, Bureau of Labor Statistics, February 2003.
Also: http://www.bls.gov/ore/pdf/ec030030.pdf
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: U.S. Department of Labor
Keyword(s): Adolescent Behavior; Alcohol Use; Child Health; Cigarette Use (see Smoking); Crime; Drug Use; Maternal Employment; Modeling, Fixed Effects; Sexual Activity; Smoking (see Cigarette Use); Substance Use

This paper examines the impact of maternal employment during a child?s first three years and during adolescence on his or her decisions to engage in a range of risky behaviors: smoking cigarettes, drinking alcohol, using marijuana and other drugs, engaging in sex and committing crimes. Using data from the NLSY79 and its young adult supplement, we find little evidence that mother?s employment early in the child?s life has lasting consequences on participation in risky behaviors. Similarly, with the possible exception of drinking alcohol?our results do not indicate that maternal employment during adolescence is correlated with increased involvement in risky activities. An earlier version of this paper was presented at the Annual Meeting of the Population Association of America, Atlanta, GA, May 9-11, 2002 and the Annual Congress of the European Society of Population Economics, Bilbao, Spain, June 13-15, 2002.
Bibliography Citation
Aughinbaugh, Alison Aileen and Maury Gittleman. "Maternal Employment and Adolescent Risky Behavior." Working Paper No. 366, Bureau of Labor Statistics, February 2003.
12. Aughinbaugh, Alison Aileen
Gittleman, Maury
Maternal Employment and Adolescent Risky Behavior
Journal of Health Economics 23,4 (July 2004): 815-839.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0167629604000542
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Adolescent Behavior; Alcohol Use; Cigarette Use (see Smoking); Crime; Drug Use; Maternal Employment; Modeling, Fixed Effects; Sexual Activity; Smoking (see Cigarette Use); Substance Use

This paper examines the impact of maternal employment during a child's first 3 years and during adolescence on his or her decisions to engage in a range of risky behaviors: smoking cigarettes, drinking alcohol, using marijuana and other drugs, engaging in sex and committing crimes. Using data from the NLSY79 and its young adult supplement, we do not find strong evidence that mother' s employment-whether early in the child' s life or during adolescence-affects the likelihood of participation in risky behaviors. We note as a caveat, however, that insufficient statistical precision makes it difficult, at times, to distinguish some potentially important effects from effects that are essentially equal to zero.
Bibliography Citation
Aughinbaugh, Alison Aileen and Maury Gittleman. "Maternal Employment and Adolescent Risky Behavior." Journal of Health Economics 23,4 (July 2004): 815-839.
13. Aughinbaugh, Alison Aileen
Gittleman, Maury
Pierret, Charles R.
Why Is the Rate of College Dropout So High?
Presented: Atlanta GA, American Economic Association Annual Meeting, January 2019
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY97
Publisher: American Economic Association
Keyword(s): College Education; Dropouts

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

During most of the twentieth century, the U.S. led the world in the percentage of its population with a college education; today, that lead has vanished. Sparked in part by the growth in the college wage premium, the proportion of high school graduates going on to post‐secondary school has been on the rise in recent decades. However, this increase in college attendance has not resulted in a proportionate rise in the number of those with four year‐degrees, because the United States has the highest dropout rate in the developed world. With a college education said to be increasingly necessary to compete in the labor market, it is important to understand why so many individuals do not achieve success in postsecondary institutions. We address this issue by examining the college attendance and completion experience of two cohorts of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY), that from 1979 and that from 1997. The percentage of high school completers who attend college rose by almost 30 percentage points between the NLSY79 and NLSY97 samples. The bulk of the growth is through starting college at a two‐year institution. This is the case throughout the test score and family income distributions. In contrast, the percentage of college attendees who earn a bachelor's degree six years after high school completion is unchanged between the two cohorts (at about 37 percent), with an increase for women and a decrease for men.
Bibliography Citation
Aughinbaugh, Alison Aileen, Maury Gittleman and Charles R. Pierret. "Why Is the Rate of College Dropout So High?" Presented: Atlanta GA, American Economic Association Annual Meeting, January 2019.
14. Aughinbaugh, Alison Aileen
Pierret, Charles R.
Rothstein, Donna S.
The Impact of Family Structure Transitions on Youth Achievement: Evidence from the Children of the NLSY79
Demography 42,3 (August 2005): 447-468.
Also: http://www.springerlink.com/content/p827q00p7x183118/
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Marital Disruption; Marital Stability; Modeling, Fixed Effects; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

We investigated the sensitivity of measures of cognitive ability and socioemotional development to changes in parents' marital status using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, 1979. We used several scores for each assessment, taken at different times relative to parents' marital transitions, which allowed us to trace the effects starting up to five years before a parent's change in marital status and continuing for up to six years afterward. It also allowed us to correct for the unobserved heterogeneity of the transition and nontransition samples by controlling for the child's fixed effect in estimating the time path of his or her response to the transition. We found that children from families with both biological parents scored significantly better on the BPI and the PIAT-math and PIAT-reading assessments than did children from nonintact families. However, much of the difference disappeared when we controlled for background variables. Furthermore, when we controlled for child fixed effects, we did not find significant longitudinal variation in these scores over long periods that encompass the marital transition. This finding suggests that most of the variation is due to cross-sectional differences and is not a result of marital transitions per se.
Bibliography Citation
Aughinbaugh, Alison Aileen, Charles R. Pierret and Donna S. Rothstein. "The Impact of Family Structure Transitions on Youth Achievement: Evidence from the Children of the NLSY79 ." Demography 42,3 (August 2005): 447-468.
15. Aughinbaugh, Alison Aileen
Pierret, Charles R.
Rothstein, Donna S.
The National Longitudinal Surveys of Youth: Research Highlights
Monthly Labor Review (September 2015): .
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/monthlylaborrev.2015.09.006
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult, NLSY97
Publisher: U.S. Department of Labor
Keyword(s): Bureau of Labor Statistics; Data Sets Documentation; Research Methodology

To help mark the Monthly Labor Review's centennial, the editors invited several producers and users of BLS data to take a look back at the last 100 years. This article highlights research based on data from the National Longitudinal Surveys of Youth. The studies presented demonstrate the breadth and uniqueness of the surveys, covering topics from employment and education to health and criminal behavior.
Bibliography Citation
Aughinbaugh, Alison Aileen, Charles R. Pierret and Donna S. Rothstein. "The National Longitudinal Surveys of Youth: Research Highlights." Monthly Labor Review (September 2015): .
16. Aughinbaugh, Alison Aileen
Robles, Omar
Sun, Hugette
Marriage and Divorce: Patterns by Gender, Race, and Educational Attainment
Monthly Labor Review (October 2013):.
Also: http://www.bls.gov/opub/mlr/2013/article/marriage-and-divorce-patterns-by-gender-race-and-educational-attainment.htm
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: U.S. Department of Labor
Keyword(s): Divorce; Educational Attainment; Ethnic Differences; Gender Differences; Marriage; Racial Differences

Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 (NLSY79), this article examines marriages and divorces of young baby boomers born during the 1957–1964 period. The article presents data on marriages and divorces by age, gender, race, and Hispanic origin, as well as by educational attainment.
Bibliography Citation
Aughinbaugh, Alison Aileen, Omar Robles and Hugette Sun. "Marriage and Divorce: Patterns by Gender, Race, and Educational Attainment." Monthly Labor Review (October 2013):.
17. Aughinbaugh, Alison Aileen
Rothstein, Donna S.
Do Cognitive Skills Moderate the Influence of Neighborhood Disadvantage on Subsequent Educational Attainment?
Economics of Education Review 44 (February 2015): 83-99.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S027277571400096X
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB); Cognitive Ability; Delinquency/Gang Activity; Educational Attainment; Educational Outcomes; Geocoded Data; Neighborhood Effects; Noncognitive Skills; Test Scores/Test theory/IRT

This paper examines how neighborhood quality affects young adults' educational outcomes, and whether neighborhood effects are moderated by cognitive test scores and other proxies for investments during childhood. The empirical results imply that high cognitive test scores help young adults overcome the effects of having lived in a disadvantaged neighborhood during adolescence with respect to attainment of a high school diploma and enrollment in a two- or four-year college. The results are robust to using alternative proxies for investments in children, such as mother's highest grade completed and measures of non-cognitive skills.
Bibliography Citation
Aughinbaugh, Alison Aileen and Donna S. Rothstein. "Do Cognitive Skills Moderate the Influence of Neighborhood Disadvantage on Subsequent Educational Attainment? ." Economics of Education Review 44 (February 2015): 83-99.
18. Aughinbaugh, Alison Aileen
Sun, Hugette
Fertility of Women in the NLSY79
Monthly Labor Review (April 2016): .
Also: http://www.bls.gov/opub/mlr/2016/article/fertility-of-women-in-the-nlsy79.htm
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: U.S. Department of Labor
Keyword(s): College Degree; Educational Attainment; Family Size; Fertility; First Birth

This article uses data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 (NLSY79)—a survey of people born between 1957 and 1964—to examine the fertility patterns of women up to age 46. Women in the NLSY79 cohort have two children, on average, and more than 80 percent of them give birth to at least one child by age 46. The bulk of first births occur before age 30. Fertility patterns differ markedly by education. Women with a college degree are more than twice as likely as those who never attended college to have no children, with this pattern being stronger among Black and Hispanic women. Fertility is delayed as education increases. Patterns of fertility related to labor market experience are evident, but they are weaker than those related to educational attainment.
Bibliography Citation
Aughinbaugh, Alison Aileen and Hugette Sun. "Fertility of Women in the NLSY79." Monthly Labor Review (April 2016): .
19. Gittleman, Maury
Aughinbaugh, Alison Aileen
Pierret, Charles R.
Why Is the Rate of College Dropout so High and Why Is It Rising for Men?
Presented: Boston MA, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, May 2014
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY97
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): College Dropouts; College Graduates; Gender Differences

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Using the NLSY79 and NLSY97, we examine changes in college completion rates and their causes. We find that college completion rates fell from one cohort to the next, with the rate for men dropping sharply, while that for women increased. Thus, any explanation for these trends must be able to account for gender differences. We will model the probability of completing college as a function of three different categories of variables: 1) student attributes; 2) characteristics of the postsecondary institutions; and 3) measures of any “mismatch” between the ability of the student and the quality of the institution. We will decompose differences over time in college completion rates into portions attributable to changes in the observed characteristics between cohorts and to changes in the coefficients. The portion attributable to changes in the observed characteristics will be further examined to assess the relative importance of student characteristics, institutional resources and mismatch.
Bibliography Citation
Gittleman, Maury, Alison Aileen Aughinbaugh and Charles R. Pierret. "Why Is the Rate of College Dropout so High and Why Is It Rising for Men?" Presented: Boston MA, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, May 2014.
20. Rothstein, Donna S.
Pierret, Charles R.
Aughinbaugh, Alison Aileen
The Impact of Family Structure Transitions on Youth Achievement: Evidence from the Children of the NLSY79
Presented: Atlanta, GA, Society of Government Economists, ASSA Program, January 2002
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: Society of Government Economists (SGE)
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Cognitive Ability; Family Structure; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

See also citation number 4151.
Bibliography Citation
Rothstein, Donna S., Charles R. Pierret and Alison Aileen Aughinbaugh. "The Impact of Family Structure Transitions on Youth Achievement: Evidence from the Children of the NLSY79." Presented: Atlanta, GA, Society of Government Economists, ASSA Program, January 2002.