Search Results

Author: Bahr, Stephen J.
Resulting in 10 citations.
1. Bahr, Stephen J.
Effects of Income and Age at Marriage on Marital Stability
Presented: Chicago, IL, American Sociological Association Annual Meetings, 1977
Cohort(s): Young Women
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Assets; Earnings; Ethnic Groups/Ethnicity; Family Resources; Marital Dissolution; Marital Stability; Marriage

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This research examines the effects of ethnic status, age at marriage, and family assets on marital stability. All three variables were found to significantly affect the chances of instability. The work of Bumpass and Sweet (1972) and Cutright (1971) was supported by the data showing that the effects of age at marriage on marital separation do not primarily reflect economic effects of early marriage. Likewise, it was suggested that the high rate of instability among blacks cannot be explained by their poorer economic status and rate of early marriage.
Bibliography Citation
Bahr, Stephen J. "Effects of Income and Age at Marriage on Marital Stability." Presented: Chicago, IL, American Sociological Association Annual Meetings, 1977.
2. Bahr, Stephen J.
Effects of Income and Assets on Marital Instability: A Longitudinal Analysis
Working Paper, Provo UT: Brigham Young University, 1977
Cohort(s): Young Women
Publisher: Brigham Young University
Keyword(s): Assets; Ethnic Groups/Ethnicity; Family Resources; Marital Instability

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study investigates the effects of income and assets on marital stability. The results show that total family assets, expected family income, and ethnic status significantly influence marital instability. For older couples, assets appear more important; whereas, expected family income had somewhat greater affect among younger couples. Being black and having few assets and a low expected income increased marital instability approximately six times.
Bibliography Citation
Bahr, Stephen J. "Effects of Income and Assets on Marital Instability: A Longitudinal Analysis." Working Paper, Provo UT: Brigham Young University, 1977.
3. Bahr, Stephen J.
The Effects of Welfare on Marital Stability and Remarriage
Journal of Marriage and Family 41,3 (August 1979): 553-560.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/351625
Cohort(s): Young Women
Publisher: National Council on Family Relations
Keyword(s): Aid for Families with Dependent Children (AFDC); Divorce; Marital Dissolution; Marital Stability; Remarriage; Welfare

This paper estimates welfare effects on marital dissolution and remarriage. The findings indicate that white women, receiving welfare, experience marriage dissolution more frequently than low-income women not receiving public assistance. This finding did not hold for black women. As the duration of marriage increases, the relationship between welfare and marital dissolution decreases. Among both black and white women with low incomes, non-AFDC recipients are three times more likely to remarry than AFDC recipients. However, the relationship between AFDC and remarriage decreases as age increases.
Bibliography Citation
Bahr, Stephen J. "The Effects of Welfare on Marital Stability and Remarriage." Journal of Marriage and Family 41,3 (August 1979): 553-560.
4. Bahr, Stephen J.
Welfare and Marital Dissolution: A Reply
Journal of Marriage and Family 43,2 (May 1981): 300-301.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/351381?seq=9
Cohort(s): Mature Women
Publisher: National Council on Family Relations
Keyword(s): Data Quality/Consistency; Research Methodology

This article responds to T.W. Draper's (see PA, Vol 67:03436) reanalysis of the NLS survey data that the present author (1979) used in his study. It is suggested that Draper's conclusions are questionable due to methodological limitations, and these limitations are identified and discussed. [(c)APA]
Bibliography Citation
Bahr, Stephen J. "Welfare and Marital Dissolution: A Reply." Journal of Marriage and Family 43,2 (May 1981): 300-301.
5. Bahr, Stephen J.
Day, Randal D.
Sex Role Attitudes, Female Employment, and Marital Satisfaction
Journal of Comparative Family Studies 9 (Spring 1978): 53-67
Cohort(s): Mature Women, Young Women
Publisher: Canadian Ethnic Studies
Keyword(s): Employment; Husbands, Attitudes; Marital Satisfaction/Quality; Marriage; Sex Roles; Wives, Attitudes

Substantial increases in the proportion of married females in the labor force have occurred during the past 25 years. This has prompted family scholars to ask whether or not the employment of the wife might affect marital satisfaction. Although this question has been examined by a number of scholars, research on this topic needs to be extended in at least two ways. First, sex role attitudes of husband and wife would appear to be important but have not been examined thoroughly. Second, other variables known to be associated with female employment have not been adequately controlled. The purpose of this paper is to examine with appropriate controls the effects of sex role attitudes and the wife's employment status on marital satisfaction.
Bibliography Citation
Bahr, Stephen J. and Randal D. Day. "Sex Role Attitudes, Female Employment, and Marital Satisfaction." Journal of Comparative Family Studies 9 (Spring 1978): 53-67.
6. Bahr, Stephen J.
Galligan, Richard J.
Teenage Marriage and Marital Stability
Youth and Society 15,4 (June 1984): 387-400.
Also: http://yas.sagepub.com/content/15/4/387
Cohort(s): Young Men
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Divorce; Education; Marital Stability; Marriage; Teenagers; Unemployment Duration; Variables, Independent - Covariate

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This longitudinal study hypothesized that level of education and length of unemployment are intervening variables between divorce and age at marriage. This hypothesis was based on the notion that a low level of education and an increased probability of unemployment are consequences of early marriage that affect the rate of divorce. The data utilized were from the Young Men's cohort of the NLS. Findings indicated that those who married at a later age, who had more education, and who did not experience unemployment were more likely to remain in a stable marriage. These three independent variables accounted for approximately 15 percent of the variance in marital stability, thereby supporting the hypothesis. The data suggested that public policies supporting education and employment of young married people may reduce some of the economic stress that contributes to divorce.
Bibliography Citation
Bahr, Stephen J. and Richard J. Galligan. "Teenage Marriage and Marital Stability." Youth and Society 15,4 (June 1984): 387-400.
7. Bahr, Stephen J.
Leigh, Geoffrey K.
Family Size, Intelligence, and Expected Education
Journal of Marriage and Family 40,2 (May 1978): 331-335.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/350763
Cohort(s): Young Men, Young Women
Publisher: National Council on Family Relations
Keyword(s): Duncan Index; Educational Aspirations/Expectations; Family Income; Family Size; Intelligence; Parental Influences

In this paper the relationships between family size, intelligence, and expected education were examined. After other relevant variables were controlled, family size had a negligible association with intelligence and expected education. Existing research which shows that children from large families are less intelligent than children from small families may have resulted from inadequate controls for other relevant variables. The strongest and most consistent predictor of intelligence was educational encouragement, while the best predictors of expected education were educational encouragement and intelligence.
Bibliography Citation
Bahr, Stephen J. and Geoffrey K. Leigh. "Family Size, Intelligence, and Expected Education." Journal of Marriage and Family 40,2 (May 1978): 331-335.
8. Constantine, John A.
Bahr, Stephen J.
Locus of Control and Marital Stability: A Longitudinal Study
Journal of Divorce 4,1 (Fall 1981): 11-22.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1300/J279v04n01_02
Cohort(s): Young Men
Publisher: Haworth Press, Inc.
Keyword(s): Divorce; Locus of Control (see Rotter Scale); Marital Disruption; Marital Stability; Rotter Scale (see Locus of Control); Socioeconomic Status (SES)

The relationship between locus of control and marital stability of young men between the ages of 16-25 who were married is investigated. A factor analysis of the locus of control measures found three factors: a leadership scale, a personal scale and a fate scale. These men were followed for five years to ascertain those who were still married and those who were not. Analysis of covariance controlling for age and socio-economic status was conducted comparing the married group with the divorced or separated group. A significant difference in the two groups appeared on the leadership scale only. The implications for this finding are discussed in relation to clinical practice and future research.
Bibliography Citation
Constantine, John A. and Stephen J. Bahr. "Locus of Control and Marital Stability: A Longitudinal Study." Journal of Divorce 4,1 (Fall 1981): 11-22.
9. Day, Randal D.
Bahr, Stephen J.
Income Changes Following Divorce and Remarriage
Journal of Divorce 9,3 (Spring 1986): 75-88.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1300/J279v09n03_06
Cohort(s): Young Men, Young Women
Publisher: Haworth Press, Inc.
Keyword(s): Gender Differences; Income; Marital Disruption; Marital Status

Data were examined for the young men and young women cohorts of the NLS. All respondents who were married were followed for 10 years and divided into three groups: (1) those who remained married, (2) those who divorced and did not remarry, and (3) those who divorced and remarried. Selected results show that female per capita income decreased substantially after divorce, while male per capita income increased substantially. Among those who remained married there was no difference between males and females in per capita family income. Differences between male and female income levels could not be attributed solely to number of dependents. Even among those with no dependents, females had much lower incomes than males. [(c)APA]
Bibliography Citation
Day, Randal D. and Stephen J. Bahr. "Income Changes Following Divorce and Remarriage." Journal of Divorce 9,3 (Spring 1986): 75-88.
10. Galligan, Richard J.
Bahr, Stephen J.
Economic Well-Being and Marital Stability: Implications for Income Maintenance Programs
Journal of Marriage and Family 40,2 (May 1978): 283-290.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/350759
Cohort(s): Young Women
Publisher: National Council on Family Relations
Keyword(s): Assets; Educational Attainment; Family Resources; Husbands, Income; Marital Dissolution; Marriage; Welfare; Well-Being

The authors examine the effects of economic well-being on marital stability. The results show that income by itself has only a negligible effect on marital dissolution; however, the level of assets has a significant effect even after relevant variables are controlled. The dissolution rate of blacks is significantly higher than for whites as is the rate for less educated women. The results suggest that direct income supplements may have little effect on marital dissolution unless they increase the level of family assets.
Bibliography Citation
Galligan, Richard J. and Stephen J. Bahr. "Economic Well-Being and Marital Stability: Implications for Income Maintenance Programs." Journal of Marriage and Family 40,2 (May 1978): 283-290.