Search Results

Author: Bronte-Tinkew, Jacinta
Resulting in 6 citations.
1. Bronte-Tinkew, Jacinta
Moore, Kristin Anderson
Capps, Randolph C.
Zaff, Jonathan
The Influence of Father Involvement on Youth Risk Behaviors Among Adolescents: A Comparison of Native-Born and Immigrant Families
Social Science Research 35,1 (March 2006): 181-209.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0049089X04000845
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Academic Press, Inc.
Keyword(s): Adolescent Behavior; Fathers and Sons; Fathers, Involvement; Immigrants; Modeling, Logit; Risk-Taking

This study explores how father involvement is associated with adolescent risk behaviors among youth in first, second, and third-generation families in US. Using data from the National Longitudinal Study of Youth 1997 (Rounds One–Three), and discrete time logit regressions, we find that father involvement predicts a reduced likelihood of subsequent engagement in risky behaviors among adolescents. Being a first-generation immigrant youth is also associated with reduced risky behaviors. Two-way interaction models indicate that father involvement matters more for sons than for daughters. Two-way interaction models also indicate that father involvement does not interact with immigration status to predict adolescent risky behaviors, but is significant for adolescents in immigrant and native-born families. These findings are preliminary because of two important limitations. First, these data did not capture country of origin variations, and the analyses did not take into consideration cultural differences in parenting among immigrant groups that are likely to influence adolescent outcomes. A strength is that all analyses control for maternal involvement.
Bibliography Citation
Bronte-Tinkew, Jacinta, Kristin Anderson Moore, Randolph C. Capps and Jonathan Zaff. "The Influence of Father Involvement on Youth Risk Behaviors Among Adolescents: A Comparison of Native-Born and Immigrant Families." Social Science Research 35,1 (March 2006): 181-209.
2. Bronte-Tinkew, Jacinta
Moore, Kristin Anderson
Carrano, Jennifer
Father-Child Relationship, Parenting Styles, and Adolescent Risk Behaviors in Intact Families
Journal of Family Issues 27,6 (June 2006): 850-881.
Also: http://jfi.sagepub.com/cgi/reprint/27/6/850
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Adolescent Behavior; Delinquency/Gang Activity; Fathers and Children; Fathers, Involvement; Gender Differences; Modeling, Logit; Parenting Skills/Styles; Risk-Taking; Substance Use

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The father-child relationship and father's parenting style are examined as predictors of first delinquency and substance use, using data from the National Longitudinal Study of Youth 1997, Rounds 1 to 3 (N = 5,345), among adolescents in intact families. Discrete time logistic regressions indicate that a more positive father-child relationship predicts a reduced risk of engagement in multiple first risky behaviors. Having a father with an authoritarian parenting style is associated with an increased risk of engaging in delinquent activity and substance use. Two-way interaction models further indicate that the negative effect of authoritarian parenting is reduced when fathers have a positive relationship with their adolescent. Permissive parenting also predicts less risky behavior when the father-child relationship is positive. The positive influence of the father-child relationship on risk behaviors is stronger for male than for female adolescents.
Bibliography Citation
Bronte-Tinkew, Jacinta, Kristin Anderson Moore and Jennifer Carrano. "Father-Child Relationship, Parenting Styles, and Adolescent Risk Behaviors in Intact Families ." Journal of Family Issues 27,6 (June 2006): 850-881.
3. Bronte-Tinkew, Jacinta
Scott, Mindy E.
Lilja, Emily
Single Custodial Fathers’ Involvement and Parenting during Adolescence and Outcomes in Emerging Adulthood
Presented: New Orleans LA, Population Association of America Meetings, April 2008.
Also: http://paa2008.princeton.edu/abstractViewer.aspx?submissionId=81444
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Disconnected Youth; Fathers, Influence; High School Completion/Graduates; Parental Influences; Parents, Single; Transition, Adulthood

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study uses nationally representative data from the NLSY97 (Rounds 1 through 7) to examine the effects of single custodial fathers’ involvement and parenting of adolescents on offspring outcomes during emerging adulthood. Results suggest that the greatest proportion of single custodial fathers exhibited permissive parenting styles. Single custodial fathers did not differ from fathers in two biological parent homes in their levels of closeness, support, or awareness. Results also indicate that offspring that reside with a single father during adolescence have reduced odds of completing high school and greater odds of being disconnected during emerging adulthood compared to offspring that reside with two biological parents. Findings suggest that residing in a single father household during adolescence continues to affect offspring well-being as they enter emerging adulthood.
Bibliography Citation
Bronte-Tinkew, Jacinta, Mindy E. Scott and Emily Lilja. "Single Custodial Fathers’ Involvement and Parenting during Adolescence and Outcomes in Emerging Adulthood." Presented: New Orleans LA, Population Association of America Meetings, April 2008.
4. Bronte-Tinkew, Jacinta
Scott, Mindy E.
Lilja, Emily
Single Custodial Fathers’ Involvement and Parenting: Implications for Outcomes in Emerging Adulthood
Journal of Marriage and Family 72,5 (October 2010): 1107-1127.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1741-3737.2010.00753.x/abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Blackwell Publishing, Inc. => Wiley Online
Keyword(s): Disconnected Youth; Fathers, Involvement; High School Completion/Graduates; Parents, Single; Transition, Adulthood

Using a sample of 3,977 youths from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY97), this study examines the unique characteristics of single-custodial-father families with adolescents and the effects of single fathers' involvement and parenting on outcomes in emerging adulthood. Findings suggest that single-custodial-father families are distinct from single-mother and 2-biological-parent families in terms of sociodemographic characteristics, parenting styles, and involvement. Parenting styles and involvement mediate the differences between single-father families and 2-parent families in terms of high school completion and disconnectedness and partially mediate differences for single-custodial-father families with a partner. Family and sociodemographic characteristics are also associated with being disconnected for adolescents residing with a cohabiting custodial father.
Bibliography Citation
Bronte-Tinkew, Jacinta, Mindy E. Scott and Emily Lilja. "Single Custodial Fathers’ Involvement and Parenting: Implications for Outcomes in Emerging Adulthood." Journal of Marriage and Family 72,5 (October 2010): 1107-1127.
5. Bronte-Tinkew, Jacinta
Zaff, Jonathan
Effects of Father Involvement on Adolescent Outcomes in Immigrant and Native Born Families
Presented: Atlanta, GA, Population Association of America Annual Meetings, May 2002
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Adolescent Behavior; Family Background; Family History; Fathers, Involvement; Immigrants; Risk-Taking

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

While there has been growing interest in father-adolescent relationships, much needs to be learned to determine how the quality of father involvement impacts youth risk behaviors. Current findings have provided only a preliminary picture and even less is known about the impact of father involvement on immigrant youth. Immigrant children constitute one of the fastest growing child populations in the U.S. Therefore, examining how father involvement is related to risk behaviors among this sub-population with unique needs is important for policy makers, practitioners and parents. We present three hypotheses that have been supported by our preliminary analysis of the National Longitudinal Study of Youth, (1997-1999) and which will be tested using a Cox regression analysis: 1) high levels of father involvement are related to reduced levels of risk behaviors; 2) immigrant status reduces the likelihood of risk behaviors; 3) father involvement moderates the relationship between immigration status and risk behaviors.
Bibliography Citation
Bronte-Tinkew, Jacinta and Jonathan Zaff. "Effects of Father Involvement on Adolescent Outcomes in Immigrant and Native Born Families." Presented: Atlanta, GA, Population Association of America Annual Meetings, May 2002.
6. Bronte-Tinkew, Jacinta
Zaff, Jonathan
Moore, Kristin Anderson
Father Involvement and Youth Transition into Risky Behaviors in Immigrant and Native-Born Families
Presented: Minneapolis, MN, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, May 2003
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Adolescent Behavior; Behavioral Problems; Fathers, Involvement; Immigrants

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study explores how father involvement is related to adolescent risk behaviors among youth in first and second-generation immigrant families and US native-born families. Using data from the National Longitudinal Study or Youth (1997 - 1999) and discrete time regressions, we test three hypotheses: 1) high levels of father involvement are related to reduced likelihood of engaging in risk behaviors; 2) immigrant status (being first or second-generation youth) reduces the likelihood of involvement in risky behaviors; and 3) father involvement interacts with immigration status, race or gender in its effects on youth risk behaviors. Findings indicate that father involvement, and being an immigrant youth (1st or 2nd gen) is associated with reduced risky behaviors. Two-way interactions indicate that father involvement does not interact with gender, race or youth immigration status in predicting risky behaviors.
Bibliography Citation
Bronte-Tinkew, Jacinta, Jonathan Zaff and Kristin Anderson Moore. "Father Involvement and Youth Transition into Risky Behaviors in Immigrant and Native-Born Families." Presented: Minneapolis, MN, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, May 2003.