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Author: DeFina, Robert
Resulting in 3 citations.
1. Hannon, Lance
DeFina, Robert
Can Incarceration Really Strip People of Racial Privilege?
Sociological Science published online (18 March 2016): DOI: 10.15195/v3.a10.
Also: https://www.sociologicalscience.com/v3-10-190/
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Sociological Science
Keyword(s): Incarceration/Jail; Modeling, Fixed Effects; Racial Studies

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

We replicate and reexamine Saperstein and Penner's prominent 2010 study which asks whether incarceration changes the probability that an individual will be seen as black or white (regardless of the individual's phenotype). Our reexamination shows that only a small part of their empirical analysis is suitable for addressing this question (the fixed-effects estimates), and that these results are extremely fragile. Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, we find that being interviewed in jail/prison does not increase the survey respondent's likelihood of being classified as black, and avoiding incarceration during the survey period does not increase a person's chances of being seen as white. We conclude that the empirical component of Saperstein and Penner's work needs to be reconsidered and new methods for testing their thesis should be investigated. The data are provided for other researchers to explore.
Bibliography Citation
Hannon, Lance and Robert DeFina. "Can Incarceration Really Strip People of Racial Privilege?" Sociological Science published online (18 March 2016): DOI: 10.15195/v3.a10.
2. Hannon, Lance
DeFina, Robert
Just Skin Deep? The Impact of Interviewer Race on the Assessment of African American Respondent Skin Tone
Race and Social Problems 6,4 (December 2014): 356-364.
Also: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s12552-014-9128-z
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Discrimination; General Social Survey (GSS); Interviewer Characteristics; Racial Differences; Racial Equality/Inequality; Skin Tone

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Over the last decade, the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission has seen a significant increase in the number of discrimination claims based on skin shade. However, in some ways, substantiating colorism has proven to be more difficult than documenting racism, as skin tone data are rarely collected and few existing skin tone measures have been validated. The present study examines an increasingly popular skin tone scale that includes a professionally designed color guide to enhance rater consistency. Logistic regression analysis of data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth and General Social Survey indicates that despite the addition of the color guide, the race of the interviewer matters for the assessment of respondent skin tone. On average, African American respondents with a white interviewer were about 3 times more likely to be classified as dark than those with an African American interviewer. We argue that failing to appropriately account for this race-of-interviewer effect can significantly impact colorism findings.
Bibliography Citation
Hannon, Lance and Robert DeFina. "Just Skin Deep? The Impact of Interviewer Race on the Assessment of African American Respondent Skin Tone." Race and Social Problems 6,4 (December 2014): 356-364.
3. Hannon, Lance
DeFina, Robert
Bruch, Sarah
The Relationship Between Skin Tone and School Suspension for African Americans
Race and Social Problems 5,4 (December 2013): 281-295.
Also: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s12552-013-9104-z
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Black Studies; Discrimination; National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (AddHealth); Racial Differences; School Suspension/Expulsion; Skin Tone

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study contributes to the research literature on colorism–discrimination based on skin tone—by examining whether skin darkness affects the likelihood that African Americans will experience school suspension. Using data from The National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, logistic regression analyses indicated that darker skin tone significantly increased the odds of suspension for African American adolescents. Closer inspection of the data revealed that this overall result was disproportionately driven by the experiences of African American females. The odds of suspension were about 3 times greater for young African American women with the darkest skin tone compared to those with the lightest skin. This finding was robust to the inclusion of controls for parental SES, delinquent behavior, academic performance, and several other variables. Furthermore, this finding was replicated using similar measures in a different sample of African Americans from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health. The results suggest that discrimination in school discipline goes beyond broad categories of race to include additional distinctions in skin tone.
Bibliography Citation
Hannon, Lance, Robert DeFina and Sarah Bruch. "The Relationship Between Skin Tone and School Suspension for African Americans." Race and Social Problems 5,4 (December 2013): 281-295.