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Author: Dunn, Dennis
Resulting in 2 citations.
1. Waldron, Ingrid
Herold, Joan
Dunn, Dennis
How Valid are Self-Report Measures for Evaluating Relationships Between Women's Health and Labor Force Participation?
Women and Health 7,2 (Summer 1982): 53-66.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1300/J013v07n02_06
Cohort(s): Mature Women
Publisher: Haworth Press, Inc.
Keyword(s): Disabled Workers; Employment; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Marital Status; Mortality; Self-Reporting; Unemployment; Work History

For a sample of white women aged 45-64, women who were out of the labor force had poorer self-reported health and higher mortality than women who were in the labor force. It has been hypothesized that women who are out of the labor force may tend to exaggerate their poor health in self-report data. However, no evidence of bias of this type was found in an analysis of the relationships between self-reported health and subsequent mortality. The validity of self-reports of illness as a reason for not seeking work has been assessed using data for a sample of 30-44 year old women who were out of the labor force. Over 90% of the women who gave illness or disability as their main reason for not seeking work had previous or contemporaneous independent, self-report evidence of poor health. The findings of this study and previous evidence indicate that poor health reduces the likelihood that a woman will join the labor force, and this is a major reason why women who are not in the labor force have poorer health than those who are in the labor force.
Bibliography Citation
Waldron, Ingrid, Joan Herold and Dennis Dunn. "How Valid are Self-Report Measures for Evaluating Relationships Between Women's Health and Labor Force Participation?" Women and Health 7,2 (Summer 1982): 53-66.
2. Waldron, Ingrid
Herold, Joan
Dunn, Dennis
Staum, Roger
Reciprocal Effects of Health and Labor Force Participation Among Women: Evidence from Two Longitudinal Studies
Journal of Occupational Medicine 24,2 (February 1982): 126-132.
Also: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7057280
Cohort(s): Mature Women
Publisher: American Occupational Medical Assciation, 1968-
Keyword(s): Blue-Collar Jobs; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Retirement; Self-Reporting; Wives; Work History

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study examines the effects of health on labor force participation and the effects of labor force participation on women's health. The results indicate that there are significant relationships between self- reported health and subsequent changes in labor force participation; however, no significant relationships were observed between labor force participation and subsequent self-reported change in health. The evidence shows that health affects women's labor force participation; however, no evidence was found that, on the average, labor force participation has harmful or beneficial effects on the general health of middle-aged married women.
Bibliography Citation
Waldron, Ingrid, Joan Herold, Dennis Dunn and Roger Staum. "Reciprocal Effects of Health and Labor Force Participation Among Women: Evidence from Two Longitudinal Studies." Journal of Occupational Medicine 24,2 (February 1982): 126-132.