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Author: Dutra, Lauren M.
Resulting in 3 citations.
1. Apollonio, Dorie E.
Dutra, Lauren M.
Glantz, Stanton A.
Associations between Smoking Trajectories, Smoke-free Laws and Cigarette Taxes in a Longitudinal Sample of Youth and Young Adults
PLOS ONE published online (11 February 2021): DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0246321.
Also: https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0246321
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: PLOS
Keyword(s): Geocoded Data; Legislation; Smoking (see Cigarette Use); State-Level Data/Policy; Taxes

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Cigarette smoking patterns vary within the population, with some individuals remaining never smokers, some remaining occasional users, and others progressing to daily use or quitting. There is little research on how population-level tobacco control policy interventions affect individuals within different smoking trajectories. We identified associations between tobacco control policy interventions and changes across different smoking trajectories among adolescents and young adults. Using 15 annual waves of data drawn from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 (NLSY97), we applied a group-based trajectory model to identify associations between days smoked per month, comprehensive smoke-free laws, cigarette tax rates, and known socio-demographic risk factors for membership in different smoking trajectories. Comprehensive smoke-free laws were associated with reduced risk of initiation and reductions in days smoked per month for all trajectories other than occasional users. Higher tax rates were associated with reduced risk of initiation and days smoked for all trajectories other than established users. Overall, population-based tobacco control policies, particularly comprehensive smoke-free laws, were associated with reduced smoking. Tobacco taxes primarily reduced risk of initiation and use among never smokers, experimenters, and quitters, consistent with previous research suggesting that tobacco manufacturers lower prices after tax increases to reduce the cost of continued smoking for established users. These results provide support for expanding smoke-free laws and establishing a minimum tobacco floor price, which could improve public health by reducing the risk of initiation as well as use among occasional and established smokers.
Bibliography Citation
Apollonio, Dorie E., Lauren M. Dutra and Stanton A. Glantz. "Associations between Smoking Trajectories, Smoke-free Laws and Cigarette Taxes in a Longitudinal Sample of Youth and Young Adults." PLOS ONE published online (11 February 2021): DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0246321.
2. Dutra, Lauren M.
Glantz, Stanton A.
Thirty-day Smoking in Adolescence is a Strong Predictor of Smoking in Young Adulthood
Preventive Medicine 109 (April 2018): 17-21.
Also: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S009174351830015X
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Adolescent Behavior; Smoking (see Cigarette Use); Transition, Adulthood

Thirty-day smoking, although a widely used measure of adolescent smoking (age 12-16), has been questioned as an accurate measure of young adult (age 26-30) smoking behavior, particularly when critiquing studies linking use of e-cigarettes with subsequent cigarette smoking. We used logistic regression to test two measures of 30-day adolescent smoking as predictors of young adult smoking in the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997. Adjusting for psychosocial covariates, compared to those who smoked zero days in the past 30 days in adolescence, odds of any past-30-day smoking in young adulthood ranged from 2.85 (95% CI: 1.85-4.37) for those who smoked 1 day to 4.81 (3.50-6.59) for those who smoked daily as adolescents, and adjusted odds of daily smoking in young adulthood ranged from 1.99 (1.24-3.18) to 4.69 (3.42-6.43). Compared with adolescent never smokers, adjusted odds of any past-30-day smoking in young adulthood among adolescent former smokers was 2.11 (1.77-2.53), and among adolescent current smokers, ranged from 3.03 (2.22-4.14) for those who smoked 1-5 cigarettes per month to 8.19 (5.80-11.55) for those who smoked daily. Adjusted odds of daily smoking in young adulthood were 2.49 (2.12-2.91) for adolescent former smokers and, among adolescent current smokers, ranged from 2.54 (1.92-3.37) for those who smoked 1-5 cigarettes per month to 8.65 (6.06-12.35) for those who smoked daily. There is a strong dose-response relationship between 30-day smoking in adolescence--even a single day in the month--and 30-day and daily smoking in young adulthood.
Bibliography Citation
Dutra, Lauren M. and Stanton A. Glantz. "Thirty-day Smoking in Adolescence is a Strong Predictor of Smoking in Young Adulthood." Preventive Medicine 109 (April 2018): 17-21.
3. Song, Anna V.
Dutra, Lauren M.
Neilands, Torsten B.
Glantz, Stanton A.
Association of Smoke-Free Laws With Lower Percentages of New and Current Smokers Among Adolescents and Young Adults: An 11-Year Longitudinal Study
JAMA Pediatrics 169,9 (September 2015): .
Also: http://archpedi.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?articleid=2430959
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: American Medical Association
Keyword(s): Cigarette Use (see Smoking); Geocoded Data; Smoking (see Cigarette Use); State-Level Data/Policy

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Objective: To quantify the effect of 100% smoke-free laws on the smoking behavior of adolescents and young adults in a longitudinal analysis.
Bibliography Citation
Song, Anna V., Lauren M. Dutra, Torsten B. Neilands and Stanton A. Glantz. "Association of Smoke-Free Laws With Lower Percentages of New and Current Smokers Among Adolescents and Young Adults: An 11-Year Longitudinal Study." JAMA Pediatrics 169,9 (September 2015): .