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Author: Guzzo, Karen Benjamin
Resulting in 8 citations.
1. Dorius, Cassandra J.
Guzzo, Karen Benjamin
Maternal Multipartnered Fertility and Adolescent Well-being
Presented: New York NY, American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, August 2013
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Drug Use; Fertility, Multiple Partners; Modeling, Logit; Modeling, OLS; Sexual Activity; Sexual Experiences/Virginity; Well-Being

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Over the past decade, there has been an emerging body of research focusing on multipartnered fertility, where a parent has children by more than one partner. The growth in union dissolution and nonmarital childbearing has increased the prevalence of multipartnered fertility, altered the circumstances in which it occurred, and fostered concern over the implications for families, particularly children .However, it is not clear if concern over multipartnered fertility, in and of itself, is warranted. We draw on 24 waves (1979-2010) of nationally representative data from the 1979 National Longitudinal Study of Youth main youth interviews to create detailed relationship histories of mothers and then link these data to self-reported assessments of adolescent well-being found in 9 waves (1994-2010) of the young adult (NLSY79-YA) supplement. Preliminary OLS and Logit regression models suggest that maternal multipartnered fertility has a significant direct and moderating effect on adolescent drug use and sexual debut net of cumulative family instability and exposure to particular family forms like marriage, cohabitation, and divorce. Moreover, maternal multipartnered fertility remained a significant predictor of both drug use and the timing of first sex even after accounting for selection into this family form and controlling for the adolescent’s experience of poverty, unemployment, and educational disadvantage at the time of birth and throughout childhood.
Bibliography Citation
Dorius, Cassandra J. and Karen Benjamin Guzzo. "Maternal Multipartnered Fertility and Adolescent Well-being." Presented: New York NY, American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, August 2013.
2. Dorius, Cassandra J.
Guzzo, Karen Benjamin
The Long Arm of Maternal Multipartnered Fertility and Adolescent Well-being
NCFMR Working Paper Series WP-13-04, National Center for Family and Marriage Research, Bowling Green State University, August 2013
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: National Center for Family and Marriage Research
Keyword(s): Age at First Intercourse; Cohabitation; Delinquency/Gang Activity; Drug Use; Family Size; Family Structure; Fertility, Multiple Partners; Household Composition; Marital History/Transitions

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Over the past decade, there has been an emerging body of research focusing on multipartnered fertility, where a parent has children by more than one partner. However, it is not clear if concern over multipartnered fertility, in and of itself, is warranted. We draw on 24 waves (1979-2010) of nationally representative data from the 1979 National Longitudinal Study of Youth main youth interviews to create detailed relationship histories of mothers and then link these data to self-reported assessments of adolescent well-being found in 9 waves (1994-2010) of the young adult (NLSY79-YA) supplement. Results suggest that maternal multipartnered fertility has a significant direct and moderated effect on adolescent drug use and sexual debut net of cumulative family instability and exposure to particular family forms like marriage, cohabitation, and divorce. Moreover, maternal multipartnered fertility remained a significant predictor of both drug use and the timing of first sex even after accounting for selection into this family form and controlling for the adolescent’s experience of poverty, unemployment, and educational disadvantage at the time of birth and throughout childhood.
Bibliography Citation
Dorius, Cassandra J. and Karen Benjamin Guzzo. "The Long Arm of Maternal Multipartnered Fertility and Adolescent Well-being." NCFMR Working Paper Series WP-13-04, National Center for Family and Marriage Research, Bowling Green State University, August 2013.
3. Guzzo, Karen Benjamin
A Research Note on the Stability of Coresidential Unions Formed Postconception
Journal of Marriage and Family 80,4 (August 2018): 841-852.
Also: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10834-018-9568-5
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Blackwell Publishing, Inc. => Wiley Online
Keyword(s): Cohabitation; Coresidence; Fathers; Marital History/Transitions; Marital Stability; Pre/post Natal Behavior; Pregnancy and Pregnancy Outcomes; Unions

There is a large literature examining the stability of mid‐pregnancy unions, and parallel work on unions formed after a nonmarital birth, but research has yet to compare pre‐ and postbirth unions and simultaneously consider whether the union is with the father or a new partner. Using the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, 1997 Cohort, the author compares the stability of coresidential unions (cohabitations and marriages) among three groups of mothers with nonunion first conceptions: those with a mid‐pregnancy union with the father (n = 203), those with a postbirth union with the father (n = 333), and those with a union with a new partner (n = 342). Compared to mid‐pregnancy unions with the father, postbirth father unions are 35% more likely to dissolve. New‐partner unions are more likely to dissolve than both types of father unions. These associations persist when accounting for union type and socioeconomic and demographic characteristics.
Bibliography Citation
Guzzo, Karen Benjamin. "A Research Note on the Stability of Coresidential Unions Formed Postconception." Journal of Marriage and Family 80,4 (August 2018): 841-852.
4. Guzzo, Karen Benjamin
Do Young Mothers and Fathers Differ in the Likelihood of Returning Home?
Journal of Marriage and Family 78,5 (October 2016): 1332-1351.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/jomf.12347/abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Blackwell Publishing, Inc. => Wiley Online
Keyword(s): First Birth; Gender Differences; Marital Stability; Parenthood; Residence, Return to Parental Home/Delayed Homeleaving

Building on research examining "boomerang" adult children, the author examines multigenerational living among young parents. Returning home likely differs between young mothers and fathers given variation in socioeconomic characteristics, health and risk taking, their own children's coresidence, and union stability. Using the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 (NLSY97), the author finds that more than 40% of young parents (n = 2,721) live with their own parents at their first child's birth or subsequently. Mothers are generally less likely to move home than fathers but only when not controlling for child coresidence and union stability. Individuals who live with all their children are less likely to return home, and controlling for child coresidence reverses gender differences, though this association disappears in the full model. Young parents who are stably single and those who experience dissolution are highly likely to return home compared to the stably partnered, with the association significantly stronger for fathers than mothers.
Bibliography Citation
Guzzo, Karen Benjamin. "Do Young Mothers and Fathers Differ in the Likelihood of Returning Home?" Journal of Marriage and Family 78,5 (October 2016): 1332-1351.
5. Guzzo, Karen Benjamin
The Living Arrangements of Young Parents and Their Children
Presented: San Diego CA, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, April-May 2015
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): First Birth; Household Composition; Modeling, Hazard/Event History/Survival/Duration; Parenthood

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Multigenerational household research often overlooks the middle generation -- those who live with their own parents and their own children. Similarly, work on boomerang kids rarely considers young parents, who might particularly need help from their parents. Using the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 (NLSY97), I examine the characteristics of three types of young parents aged 24 (N = 1,984): living with parents consistently between birth and age 24; living with parents at birth but subsequently moved out; and living independently at birth. Results show that more than half of young parents live with their own parents at their first birth or subsequently. Among those who were either living independently at birth or moved out subsequently, event history models reveal that union instability is strongly associated with the odds of moving back home, as is not living with their firstborn child. Overall, young parents have complicated and fluid living arrangements.
Bibliography Citation
Guzzo, Karen Benjamin. "The Living Arrangements of Young Parents and Their Children." Presented: San Diego CA, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, April-May 2015.
6. Guzzo, Karen Benjamin
Union Formation and Stability Among Non-Cohabiting, Unmarried Parents: Incorporating Unions with Their Child's Parent
Presented: Washington DC, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, March-April 2016
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Childbearing, Premarital/Nonmarital; Cohabitation; First Birth; Parental Marital Status

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Although many nonmarital births are to cohabitors, roughly 40% of such births are to those not living with a partner. Many of these individuals will go on to form unions, some of which are likely to be with their child's biological parent. In this paper, I will use the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 (NLSY97) to analyze the likelihood that never-married, never-cohabited young adults with a first birth outside a coresidential union will remain single, form a coresidential union with the child's other biological parent, or form a union with a new partner, paying attention to differences across race-ethnicity, socioeconomic and demographic characteristics as well as considering partner characteristics and relationship quality. I will also investigate the stability of these unions, comparing whether unions formed with the child's biological parent are more or less stable than those formed with new partners.
Bibliography Citation
Guzzo, Karen Benjamin. "Union Formation and Stability Among Non-Cohabiting, Unmarried Parents: Incorporating Unions with Their Child's Parent." Presented: Washington DC, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, March-April 2016.
7. Guzzo, Karen Benjamin
Dorius, Cassandra J.
Challenges in Measuring and Studying Multipartnered Fertility in American Survey Data
Population Research and Policy Review 35,4 (August 2016): 553-579.
Also: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11113-016-9398-9
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult, NLSY97
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Data Analysis; Data Quality/Consistency; Fertility, Multiple Partners; Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study; National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (AddHealth); National Survey of Family Growth (NSFG); Survey of Income and Program Participation (SIPP)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Multipartnered fertility ("MPF") has become a major topic of interest in the United States due to potential negative linkages with parental, child, and family wellbeing. A first step in studying any newly emerging (or newly identified) social phenomenon is to properly define the issue and identify its prevalence. However, this is problematic in the case of MPF because most existing sources of data were not originally designed to study MPF. We examine the major data sources used to produce estimates of MPF in the United States, discussing the methodological issues that produce conflicting prevalence estimates and providing guidelines for producing comparable estimates. We also discuss important considerations for research seeking to link MPF and outcomes. Our recommendations will help researchers situate their findings in the broader literature and spur future research.
Bibliography Citation
Guzzo, Karen Benjamin and Cassandra J. Dorius. "Challenges in Measuring and Studying Multipartnered Fertility in American Survey Data." Population Research and Policy Review 35,4 (August 2016): 553-579.
8. Guzzo, Karen Benjamin
Dorius, Cassandra J.
Does Maternal Multipartnered Fertility Affect the Mother-Child Relationship?
Presented: Boston MA, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, May 2014
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Fertility, Multiple Partners; Mothers; Parent Supervision/Monitoring; Parent-Child Relationship/Closeness; Siblings; Well-Being

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Multipartnered fertility (MPF) is widely considered detrimental to family and child well-being, yet the mechanisms by which MPF may affect well-being are unclear. We suggest that due to the higher instability and greater complexity of families with MPF, children with half-siblings may have a weaker mother-child relationship than children with only full siblings. Using the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 (NLSY) and drawing from both mother’s and children’s reports, we compare the perceptions of firstborn children with younger siblings from MPF and single-partner fertility (SPF) homes regarding how much their mothers monitor and spend time with them, how close they feel to their mother and how much they share with their mother, and how often they perceive their mother missing important events. The NLSY provides rich background information and data on family instability and transitions to more accurately allow us to isolate the effects of MPF from other factors.
Bibliography Citation
Guzzo, Karen Benjamin and Cassandra J. Dorius. "Does Maternal Multipartnered Fertility Affect the Mother-Child Relationship?" Presented: Boston MA, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, May 2014.