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Author: Kuo, Janet
Resulting in 5 citations.
1. Kuo, Janet
Long-Term and Short-Term Economic Resources and Marriage Formation: An Insight into Black-White Differences in Marriage Formation among Cohabitors
Presented: Boston MA, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, May 2014
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Cohabitation; Education; Marriage; Net Worth; Racial Differences; Wealth

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Using male data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 (NLSY 97), we consider wealth accumulation (i.e., net worth) as one of important components of long-term economic prospects that may facilitate the formation of marriage among cohabitors, net of other relatively short-term economic prospects (i.e., earnings and employment status). Additionally, given the black-white disparity in access to wealth, our thesis is that taking into account wealth accumulation will help us further explain black-white differences in marriage formation among cohabitors.Our preliminary results suggest that long-term economic resources—wealth—is particularly central in marriage formation for cohabitors, whereas short-term economic resources--earnings and employment status are key to remaining cohabiting, relative to dissolution. Education, as a proxy for long-term economic prospect too, is significantly associated with increased risk of marriage and decreased risk of separation. Overall, the inclusion of measures for both short-term and long-term economic prospects helps explain the black-white difference in marriage formation substantially.
Bibliography Citation
Kuo, Janet. "Long-Term and Short-Term Economic Resources and Marriage Formation: An Insight into Black-White Differences in Marriage Formation among Cohabitors." Presented: Boston MA, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, May 2014.
2. Kuo, Janet
Who Benefit from College Education? Relationship Outcomes of Cohabitors in the United States
Presented: San Diego CA, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, April-May 2015
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Cohabitation; College Education; College Enrollment; Debt/Borrowing; Labor Market Outcomes; Marriage; Student Loans

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

In the United States, college graduates are more likely to experience patterns of union formation that lead to stable family life. The goal of this proposed study is to extend the existing literature on educational differences in family formation by exploring how varied levels of college experience--with and without attainment of a college degree--interact with loads of college loan debts and labor market outcomes in shaping cohabitors' union transition behavior—progression to marriage or separation. The preliminary results suggest that college enrollment experience can shape union transition behavior of cohabitors beyond degree attainment but the pattern varies by gender. Future analysis will further explore the role that student loan debts and labor market outcomes play in conditioning the association between college enrollment experience and union transitions of cohabitors.
Bibliography Citation
Kuo, Janet. "Who Benefit from College Education? Relationship Outcomes of Cohabitors in the United States." Presented: San Diego CA, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, April-May 2015.
3. Kuo, Janet
Raley, Kelly
Job Autonomy and Marriage Formation: A Comparison between Men and Women
Presented: San Francisco CA, Population Association of America Meetings, May 2012
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Gender Differences; Income; Marriage; Occupational Choice; Occupational Status

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Using data from the NLSY 97, this paper investigates how work-related assets (income, status, and autonomy) shape young adults’ transition to first marriage. We hypothesize that the relationship between work-related assets and marriage varies by age as well as gender and find that for women income is a stronger positive predictor of marriage in the mid-to late-20s than at earlier ages. Additionally, non-monetary aspects of work also matter. Occupational autonomy—being able to structure one’s own work—facilitates entry into first marriage for women in their mid-to late-20s but not in their late teens and early 20s. In contrast, for men, job autonomy has no effect on marriage formation at these ages. When job autonomy and income are taken into account, occupational status does not have a statistically significant association with marriage formation for either women or men.
Bibliography Citation
Kuo, Janet and Kelly Raley. "Job Autonomy and Marriage Formation: A Comparison between Men and Women." Presented: San Francisco CA, Population Association of America Meetings, May 2012.
4. McClendon, David
Kuo, Janet
Raley, Kelly
The Labor of Love: Occupational Education and the Transition to First Marriage
Presented: New Orleans LA, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, April 2013
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Cohabitation; College Education; Education; Marriage; Occupations

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Explanations for the marriage gap by educational attainment in the US emphasize the economic and cultural attractiveness of a college degree on the marriage market. However, education may also shape the opportunities that men and women have to meet other college-educated partners, particularly in contexts with significant educational stratification. We focus on work—and the social ties it supports—and consider whether the educational composition of one’s occupation is important for marriage formation. Employing discrete-time event history methods using the NLSY-97, we find that occupational education is positively associated with transitioning to first marriage and with marrying a college-educated partner for women but not for men. This association does not vary by women’s own educational attainment and is not significant for entry into cohabitation. Our approach calls attention to an unexplored, indirect link between education and marriage that, we argue, helps explain why college-educated adults enjoy better marriage prospects.
Bibliography Citation
McClendon, David, Janet Kuo and Kelly Raley. "The Labor of Love: Occupational Education and the Transition to First Marriage." Presented: New Orleans LA, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, April 2013.
5. Raley, R. Kelly
Kuo, Janet
Does Employment Contribute to Higher College Dropout Rates among Students from Disadvantaged Backgrounds?
Presented: Washington, DC, Population Association of America Annual Meetings, March 31-April 2, 2011
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): College Dropouts; Disadvantaged, Economically; Employment; Family Background; Socioeconomic Background

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The goal of this research is to better understand factors that contribute to the positive association between parental education and other aspects of advantage rooted in family background and college success. We begin our analysis by describing variation by parental education in student employment status during the academic year and during the summer. We find that students with college-educated parents have the lowest levels of employment, and are especially unlikely to be employed for more than 20 hours during the school year. Following we explore whether college-student employment is associated college persistence in the first year. Extensive employment is positively associated with the likelihood of dropping out, but only during the academic year. During the summer, employment is positively associated with persistence. Results indicate, however, that employment does not mediate the association between parental education and college persistence in the first year
Bibliography Citation
Raley, R. Kelly and Janet Kuo. "Does Employment Contribute to Higher College Dropout Rates among Students from Disadvantaged Backgrounds?" Presented: Washington, DC, Population Association of America Annual Meetings, March 31-April 2, 2011.