Search Results

Author: Raley, R. Kelly
Resulting in 8 citations.
1. Harris, Kathleen Mullan
Raley, R. Kelly
Rindfuss, Ronald R.
Family Configurations and Child-Care Patterns: Families with Two or More Preschool-Age Children
Social Science Quarterly 83, 2 (June 2002): 455-471.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/1540-6237.00094/abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Blackwell Publishing, Inc. => Wiley Online
Keyword(s): Births, Repeat / Spacing; Child Care; Children, Preschool; Family Characteristics; Family Size; Family Structure; Fertility; Household Composition; Household Structure; Life Course; Maternal Employment; Preschool Children; Social Roles; Women's Roles; Work Hours

Objectives. This article examines the extent to which mothers must find child-care arrangements for more than one preschool child, and when they do, the strategies they adopt to juggle their work and family roles. Methods. We use national data from numerous studies with information on fertility and child care among employed mothers with children. Results. We find that it is a common life-course experience for mother to need child care for two or more preschool-age children. Employed mothers' preferred strategy for child care for their multiple preschool-age children is to place all preschoolers in the same type of arrangement, choosing parental care more often and center care less often than employed mothers with one preschooler. Conclusions. Previous child-care research has ignored the complexities parents face when they must make child-care decisions about all their preschool-age children simultaneously. Child-Care decisions need to be studied within the family and household context.
Bibliography Citation
Harris, Kathleen Mullan, R. Kelly Raley and Ronald R. Rindfuss. "Family Configurations and Child-Care Patterns: Families with Two or More Preschool-Age Children." Social Science Quarterly 83, 2 (June 2002): 455-471.
2. Kuo, Janet Chen-Lan
Raley, R. Kelly
Is It All About Money? Work Characteristics and Women’s and Men’s Marriage Formation in Early Adulthood
Journal of Family Issues 37,8 (June 2016): 1046-1073.
Also: http://jfi.sagepub.com/content/37/8/1046.abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Control; Earnings; Family Formation; Marital Status; Marriage; Occupational Information Network (O*NET)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 97, this article investigates how work characteristics (earnings and autonomy) shape young adults' transition to first marriage separately for men and women. The results suggest that earnings are positively associated with marriage and that this association is as strong for women as men in their mid to late 20s. Additionally, occupational autonomy—having the control over one's own work structure—facilitates entry into first marriage for women in their mid to late 20s but, for men, occupational autonomy is not associated with marriage at these ages. These results suggest that even as women's earnings are increasingly important for marriage, other aspects of work are also important for stable family formation.
Bibliography Citation
Kuo, Janet Chen-Lan and R. Kelly Raley. "Is It All About Money? Work Characteristics and Women’s and Men’s Marriage Formation in Early Adulthood." Journal of Family Issues 37,8 (June 2016): 1046-1073.
3. McClendon, David
Kuo, Janet Chen-Lan
Raley, R. Kelly
Opportunities to Meet: Occupational Education and Marriage Formation in Young Adulthood
Demography 51,4 (August 2014): 1319-1344.
Also: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24980386
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Educational Attainment; Marriage; Modeling, Hazard/Event History/Survival/Duration; Occupational Information Network (O*NET); Occupations

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

We focus on work--and the social ties that it supports--and consider whether the educational composition of occupations is important for marriage formation during young adulthood. Employing discrete-time event-history methods using the NLSY-97, we find that occupational education is positively associated with transitioning to first marriage and with marrying a college-educated partner for women but not for men.
Bibliography Citation
McClendon, David, Janet Chen-Lan Kuo and R. Kelly Raley. "Opportunities to Meet: Occupational Education and Marriage Formation in Young Adulthood." Demography 51,4 (August 2014): 1319-1344.
4. Raley, R. Kelly
Gore, Kurt A.
Pearson, Jennifer
Chasing a Greased Pig: How Can We Get a Handle on Adolescent Dating and Romantic Relationships?
Presented: Los Angeles CA, Population Association of America Meetings, March-April 2006
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Adolescent Behavior; Dating; Ethnic Differences; National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (AddHealth)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study uses data from the first wave of the National Longitudinal Survey of Adolescent Health (Add Health) as well as the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth – 1997 (NLSY) to investigate the question of whether dating and romance are essentially the same. Our approach is to first compare the proportion who say they are dating (NLSY) to the proportion who say they are romantically involved in the (Add Health). Next, we will use the Add Health to examine the proportion of adolescents reporting romantic involvement who say that they went out alone or with a group. Finally, the analyses investigate the predictors of dating and romantic involvement to provide greater insight into the differing meanings of dating and romance. We find evidence to support the conclusion that dating and romance do not describe equivalent relationship types.
Bibliography Citation
Raley, R. Kelly, Kurt A. Gore and Jennifer Pearson. "Chasing a Greased Pig: How Can We Get a Handle on Adolescent Dating and Romantic Relationships?" Presented: Los Angeles CA, Population Association of America Meetings, March-April 2006.
5. Raley, R. Kelly
Harris, Kathleen Mullan
Rindfuss, Ronald R.
The Quality and Comparability of Child Care Data in U.S. Surveys
Social Science Research 29,3 (September 2000): 356-381.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0049089X00906732
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Academic Press, Inc.
Keyword(s): Child Care; Data Quality/Consistency; National Survey of Families and Households (NSFH); Survey of Income and Program Participation (SIPP)

This paper examines the quality and comparability of child care data obtained from eight waves of data from four nationally representative data sources: the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (1986 and 1988), the Survey of Income and Program Participation (1986, 1987, 1988, and 1990), the National Child Care Survey, and the National Survey of Families and Households. We examine whether different study designs and survey techniques for asking questions about child care produce similar results on both the levels and determinants of child care. We identified four main sources of difference in the data sets that could impact the quality and comparability of child care research: when the interview is conducted; screening questions used to determine who is asked about child care; the population of parents and children represented in the survey; and the way child care questions are asked. Our findings indicate that summer interviews and screening on mother's work status produce the largest differences in the levels and effects of child care across these studies. Even after removing the effects of summer interviews and screening questions, however, substantial differences exist across the studies.
Bibliography Citation
Raley, R. Kelly, Kathleen Mullan Harris and Ronald R. Rindfuss. "The Quality and Comparability of Child Care Data in U.S. Surveys." Social Science Research 29,3 (September 2000): 356-381.
6. Raley, R. Kelly
Kim, Yujin
Early Family Formation: An Important Impediment to College Completion?
Presented: Dallas, TX, Population Association of America Meetings, April 2010
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): College Dropouts; College Education; College Enrollment; Educational Attainment; Family Formation; Fertility

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Substantial amounts of previous research have investigated the impact of a teen birth on high school completion. Although the effects of fertility on high school degree attainment are weaker than once believed, the general consensus is that teen fertility does have negative effects on educational attainment. Yet, we know little about the effects of fertility and family formation at higher levels on postsecondary attainment despite the fact that fertility rates are higher in the early twenties than they are in the teen years and rates of college-dropout are higher than rates of dropping out of high school. This extended abstract describes analysis using data from the 1997 NLSY to investigate the influence of family formation events on college persistence and degree attainment for both men and women.
Bibliography Citation
Raley, R. Kelly and Yujin Kim. "Early Family Formation: An Important Impediment to College Completion?" Presented: Dallas, TX, Population Association of America Meetings, April 2010.
7. Raley, R. Kelly
Kim, Yujin
Daniels, Kimberly
Young Adults' Fertility Expectations and Events: Associations With College Enrollment and Persistence
Journal of Marriage and Family 74,4 (August 2012): 866-879.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1741-3737.2012.00990.x/abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Blackwell Publishing, Inc. => Wiley Online
Keyword(s): College Dropouts; College Education; College Enrollment; Expectations/Intentions; Fertility; Parenthood; Pregnancy and Pregnancy Outcomes

The analyses described in this article investigated the association between adolescent fertility expectations and college enrollment (N = 7,838). They also explored the potential impact of fertility expectations and events on college persistence among 4-year (n = 2,605) and 2-year (n = 1,962) college students. The analysis, which used data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 cohort, showed a significant association between expectations for early parenthood and the likelihood of going to a 4-year college or 2-year college for both men and women. In addition, the authors found that pregnancies were associated with an increased risk of college dropout for women; however, if all of the estimated effect of pregnancies on the risk of dropout were causal, they would still not be a major factor contributing to educational attainment because fertile pregnancies among college women are so rare.
Bibliography Citation
Raley, R. Kelly, Yujin Kim and Kimberly Daniels. "Young Adults' Fertility Expectations and Events: Associations With College Enrollment and Persistence." Journal of Marriage and Family 74,4 (August 2012): 866-879.
8. Raley, R. Kelly
Kuo, Janet
Does Employment Contribute to Higher College Dropout Rates among Students from Disadvantaged Backgrounds?
Presented: Washington, DC, Population Association of America Annual Meetings, March 31-April 2, 2011
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): College Dropouts; Disadvantaged, Economically; Employment; Family Background; Socioeconomic Background

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The goal of this research is to better understand factors that contribute to the positive association between parental education and other aspects of advantage rooted in family background and college success. We begin our analysis by describing variation by parental education in student employment status during the academic year and during the summer. We find that students with college-educated parents have the lowest levels of employment, and are especially unlikely to be employed for more than 20 hours during the school year. Following we explore whether college-student employment is associated college persistence in the first year. Extensive employment is positively associated with the likelihood of dropping out, but only during the academic year. During the summer, employment is positively associated with persistence. Results indicate, however, that employment does not mediate the association between parental education and college persistence in the first year
Bibliography Citation
Raley, R. Kelly and Janet Kuo. "Does Employment Contribute to Higher College Dropout Rates among Students from Disadvantaged Backgrounds?" Presented: Washington, DC, Population Association of America Annual Meetings, March 31-April 2, 2011.