Search Results

Author: Stewart, Jennifer
Resulting in 4 citations.
1. Christie-Mizell, C. André
Keil, Jacqueline M.
Laske, Mary Therese
Stewart, Jennifer
Bullying Behavior, Parents’ Work Hours and Early Adolescents’ Perceptions of Time Spent With Parents
Youth and Society 43,4 (December 2011): 1570-1595.
Also: http://yas.sagepub.com/content/43/4/1570.abstract
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Behavioral Problems; Bullying/Victimization; Child Self-Administered Supplement (CSAS); Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Maternal Employment; Parent-Child Interaction; Social Capital

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This research investigates the relationships among bullying behavior, mother’s and father’s work hours, and early adolescents’ perceptions of whether they spend sufficient time with their parents. In cross-sectional models, we find maternal work hours are modestly associated with increases in bullying behavior. However, in more rigorous change models, our findings indicate that over time maternal work hours bear no direct relationship to bullying behavior. Moreover, in our final models, an interaction between father’s work hours and perceptions of time spent with him has one of the most robust associations with bullying for adolescents. When paternal employment is full- or overtime and youth perceive they do not spend enough with their fathers, bullying behavior increases. Other important factors that shape bullying behavior are the quality of the home environment and the adolescent’s school performance.
Bibliography Citation
Christie-Mizell, C. André, Jacqueline M. Keil, Mary Therese Laske and Jennifer Stewart. "Bullying Behavior, Parents’ Work Hours and Early Adolescents’ Perceptions of Time Spent With Parents." Youth and Society 43,4 (December 2011): 1570-1595.
2. Christie-Mizell, C. André
Keil, Jacqueline M.
Stewart, Jennifer
Pryor, Erin M.
Child and Adolescent Bullying Behavior: Parents' Work Hours and Children's Perceptions of Time
Presented: Boston MA, American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, July 2008
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Adolescent Behavior; Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Bullying/Victimization; Child Self-Administered Supplement (CSAS); Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Maternal Employment; Parent-Child Interaction; Social Capital

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This research investigates the relationships among bullying behavior, mother’s and father’s work hours, and early adolescents’ perceptions of whether they spend sufficient time with their parents. In cross-sectional models, we find maternal work hours are modestly associated with increases in bullying behavior. However, in more rigorous change models, our findings indicate that over time maternal work hours bear no direct relationship to bullying behavior. Moreover, in our final models, an interaction between father’s work hours and perceptions of time spent with him has one of the most robust associations with bullying for adolescents. When paternal employment is full- or overtime and youth perceive they do not spend enough with their fathers, bullying behavior increases. Other important factors that shape bullying behavior are the quality of the home environment and the adolescent’s school performance.
Bibliography Citation
Christie-Mizell, C. André, Jacqueline M. Keil, Jennifer Stewart and Erin M. Pryor. "Child and Adolescent Bullying Behavior: Parents' Work Hours and Children's Perceptions of Time." Presented: Boston MA, American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, July 2008.
3. Christie-Mizell, C. André
Steelman, Lala Carr
Stewart, Jennifer
Seeing Their Surroundings: The Effects of Neighborhood Setting and Race on Maternal Distress
Social Science Research 32,3 (September 2003): 402-429.
Also: http://search.epnet.com/direct.asp?an=10425007&db=aph
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Academic Press, Inc.
Keyword(s): CESD (Depression Scale); Depression (see also CESD); Educational Attainment; Ethnic Differences; Family Structure; Household Income; Marital Status; Maternal Employment; Neighborhood Effects; Racial Differences; Rural/Urban Differences

Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth at two points in time, we examine the relationship between maternal psychological distress and perceived neighborhood disorder for three groups: African Americans, Mexican Americans and whites. Findings show that across all racial groups neighborhood perceptions are more salient in shaping levels of distress than is objective neighborhood location. However, objective location (e.g., central city residence) does considerably influence how mothers perceive their neighborhoods in the first place. These results suggest that future research on the independent consequences of the neighborhood context should incorporate both subjective assessments and objective indicators of living arrangements. We also observe that perceived neighborhood disorder and psychological distress are affected by marital status, educational attainment, household income, and employment. Moreover, compared to their Mexican American and white counterparts, family structure (e.g., number of children) appears to be more detrimental in shaping outcomes for African American mothers. [Copyright 2003 Elsevier]
Bibliography Citation
Christie-Mizell, C. André, Lala Carr Steelman and Jennifer Stewart. "Seeing Their Surroundings: The Effects of Neighborhood Setting and Race on Maternal Distress." Social Science Research 32,3 (September 2003): 402-429.
4. Stewart, Jennifer
The Mommy Track: The Consequences of Gender Ideology and Aspirations on Age at First Motherhood
Journal of Sociology and Social Welfare 30,2 (June 2003): 3-30.
Also: http://www.wmich.edu/hhs/newsletters_journals/jssw/30-2.htm
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Western Michigan University School of Social Work
Keyword(s): Adolescent Fertility; Age at First Birth; Childbearing; Disadvantaged, Economically; Family Background; Fertility; Gender Differences; Pregnancy, Adolescent; Racial Differences; Self-Esteem; Socioeconomic Background

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

While there is extensive and compelling evidence that growing up in an impoverished background leads to early fertility, few studies explain why early socioeconomic disadvantage leads to early childbearing. Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, I test whether gender ideology, as well as educational and occupational aspirations, mediates the connection between poverty and teen fertility patterns. Traditional gender ideology depresses age at first motherhood. Adolescent aspirations appear to act as protective factors in the production of early pregnancy.[ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
(PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved)
Bibliography Citation
Stewart, Jennifer. "The Mommy Track: The Consequences of Gender Ideology and Aspirations on Age at First Motherhood." Journal of Sociology and Social Welfare 30,2 (June 2003): 3-30.