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Source: Addictive Behaviors
Resulting in 5 citations.
1. Bares, Cristina
Andrade, Fernando
Racial/Ethnic Differences in the Longitudinal Progression of Co-occurring Negative Affect and Cigarette Use: From Adolescence to Young Adulthood
Addictive Behaviors 37,5 (May 2012): 632-640.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0306460312000172
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): CESD (Depression Scale); Cigarette Use (see Smoking); Depression (see also CESD); Ethnic Differences; Health, Mental; Racial Differences; Smoking (see Cigarette Use); Socioeconomic Status (SES)

Aims: This study examined the longitudinal progression of the co-occurrence of cigarette use and negative affect among the general population of U.S. adolescents and young adults and between racial/ethnic groups.

Methods: Data for this study consisted of Waves 4, 6, and 8 of the NLSY97 longitudinal study containing a nationally representative sample of U.S. adolescents and young adults. A total of 7,979 adolescents (Mean age at Wave 4 = 17.98, SD = 1.44, 49% female) were included in the analyses. To investigate the co-morbidity between negative affect and cigarette use, a latent factor of negative affect and single indicator of cigarette consumption were examined at each wave. A three wave Bivariate Autoregressive Cross-Lagged Effect Model was estimated to test the conjoint trajectory of negative affect and smoking.

Results: For all racial/ethnic groups prior negative affect status influenced future negative affect between waves and prior negative affect was positively related to increases in smoking in subsequent waves. The longitudinal trajectory of negative affect for the three racial/ethnic groups was the same, but racial/ethnic group differences were observed in the strength of the longitudinal relationship between previous and future cigarette use. Specifically, the following racial/ethnic differences were observed, even after controlling for the effect of SES; White young adults were found to exhibit the strongest association between cigarette use in the first two waves, followed by Hispanic individuals and lastly by African Americans. In the last two waves, African American young adults were found to have the strongest association between cigarette use at the latter two waves, followed by White individuals.

Conclusions: Both negative affect and cigarette consumption influence each other during the transition between late adolescence and young adulthood but the magnitude of the associations between cigarettes use across waves differed bet ween racial/ethnic groups. Implications for prevention and treatment programs include considering both cigarette use and negative affect as two factors that jointly impact each other and that should be targeted simultaneously.

Bibliography Citation
Bares, Cristina and Fernando Andrade. "Racial/Ethnic Differences in the Longitudinal Progression of Co-occurring Negative Affect and Cigarette Use: From Adolescence to Young Adulthood." Addictive Behaviors 37,5 (May 2012): 632-640.
2. Grimm, Kevin J.
Stegmann, Gabriela
Modeling Change Trajectories with Count and Zero-inflated Outcomes: Challenges and Recommendations
Addictive Behaviors published online (10 September 2018): DOI: 10.1016/j.addbeh.2018.09.016.
Also: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0306460318310177
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Adolescent Behavior; Alcohol Use; Modeling; Modeling, Mixed Effects

The goal of this article is to describe models to examine change over time with an outcome that represents a count, such as the number of alcoholic drinks per day. Common challenges encountered with this type of data are: (1) the outcome is discrete, may have a large number of zeroes, and may be overdispersed, (2) the data are clustered (multiple observations within each individual), (3) the researchers needs to carefully consider and choose an appropriate time metric, and (4) the researcher needs to identify both a proper individual (potentially nonlinear) change model and an appropriate distributional form that captures the properties of the data. In this article, we provide an overview of generalized linear models, generalized estimating equation models, and generalized latent variable (mixed-effects) models for longitudinal count outcomes focusing on the Poisson, negative binomial, zero-inflated, and hurdle distributions. We review common challenges and provide recommendations for identifying an appropriate change trajectory while determining an appropriate distributional form for the outcome (e.g., determining zero-inflation and overdispersion). We demonstrate the process of fitting and choosing a model with empirical longitudinal data on alcohol intake across adolescence collected as part of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997.
Bibliography Citation
Grimm, Kevin J. and Gabriela Stegmann. "Modeling Change Trajectories with Count and Zero-inflated Outcomes: Challenges and Recommendations." Addictive Behaviors published online (10 September 2018): DOI: 10.1016/j.addbeh.2018.09.016.
3. Huang, David Y.C.
Lanza, H. Isabella
Anglin, M. Douglas
Association Between Adolescent Substance Use and Obesity in Young Adulthood: A Group-based Dual Trajectory Analysis
Addictive Behaviors 38,11 (November 2013): 2653-2660.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0306460313001846
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Alcohol Use; Body Mass Index (BMI); Family Income; Modeling, Biometric; Modeling, Trajectory analysis; Obesity; Smoking (see Cigarette Use); Substance Use; Weight

Purpose: This study investigated whether and how trajectories of substance use in adolescence were associated with obesity trajectories in young adulthood. We hypothesized that: (1) exposure to persistent substance use throughout adolescence may heighten obesity risk in young adulthood; and (2) such associations may differ once gender, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, and obesity status in adolescence, are considered.

Methods: The study included 5141 adolescents from the child sample of the 1979 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth and utilized biennial data across the 12 assessments (1986–2008) to examine trajectories of substance use behaviors (i.e., cigarette smoking, alcohol use, and marijuana use) from ages 12 to 18 and obesity trajectories from ages 20 to 24. Group-based dual trajectory modeling was applied to examine sequential associations of trajectories of each type of substance use behavior with obesity trajectories.

Results: Three distinctive trajectory patterns were respectively identified for cigarette smoking, alcohol use, and marijuana use from ages 12 to 18, as well as for obesity status (BMI ≥ 30) from ages 20 to 24. Taking into account gender, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, and obesity status in adolescence, adolescents with the most problematic smoking trajectory (High-decreasing) were more likely to exhibit a High-obesity trajectory from ages 20 to 24. Also, adolescents with an Increasing marijuana use trajectory were more likely to exhibit an Increased obesity trajectory in young adulthood.

Conclusions: The current study demonstrates that adolescent substance use is associated with subsequent obesity in young adulthood. The associations appear to differ based on the type of substance use and patterns of use.

Bibliography Citation
Huang, David Y.C., H. Isabella Lanza and M. Douglas Anglin. "Association Between Adolescent Substance Use and Obesity in Young Adulthood: A Group-based Dual Trajectory Analysis." Addictive Behaviors 38,11 (November 2013): 2653-2660.
4. Malone, Patrick S.
Northrup, Thomas F.
Masyn, Katherine E.
Lamis, Dorian A.
Lamont, Andrea E.
Initiation and Persistence of Alcohol Use in United States Black, Hispanic, and White Male and Female Youth
Addictive Behaviors 37,3 (March 2012): 299-305.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0306460311003728
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Alcohol Use; Ethnic Differences; Gender Differences; Modeling; Racial Differences

Background: The relation between early and frequent alcohol use and later difficulties is quite strong. However, the degree that alcohol use persists, which is often a necessary cause for developing alcohol-related problems or an alcohol use disorder, is not well studied, particularly with attention to race and gender. A novel statistical approach, the Multi-facet Longitudinal Model, enables the concurrent study of age of initiation and persistence.

Methods: The models were applied to longitudinal data on youth alcohol use from ages 12 through 19, collected in the (U.S.) National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 cohort (N = 8984).

Results: Results confirmed that Black adolescents initiate alcohol use at later ages than do White youth. Further, after initiation, White adolescents were substantially more likely than Black adolescents to continue reporting alcohol use in subsequent years. Hispanic teens showed an intermediate pattern. Gender differences were more ambiguous, with a tendency for boys to be less likely to continue drinking after initiation than were girls.

Conclusions: Novel findings from the new analytic models suggest differential implications of early alcohol use by race and gender. Early use of alcohol might be less consequential for males who initiate alcohol use early, Black, and Hispanic youth than for their female and White counterparts.

Bibliography Citation
Malone, Patrick S., Thomas F. Northrup, Katherine E. Masyn, Dorian A. Lamis and Andrea E. Lamont. "Initiation and Persistence of Alcohol Use in United States Black, Hispanic, and White Male and Female Youth." Addictive Behaviors 37,3 (March 2012): 299-305.
5. Wells, Samantha L.
Graham, Kathryn
Speechley, Mark
Koval, John J.
Do Predisposing and Family Background Characteristics Modify or Confound the Relationship Between Drinking Frequency and Alcohol-Related Aggression? A Study of Late Adolescent and Young Adult Drinkers
Addictive Behaviors 31,4 (April 2006): 661-675.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0306460305001516
Cohort(s): NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Alcohol Use; Behavior, Violent; Poverty; Risk-Taking

The present study examined whether predisposing and family background characteristics confounded (common cause/general deviance theory) or modified (conditional/interactive theory) the association between drinking frequency and alcohol-related aggression. A secondary analysis of the US National Longitudinal Survey of Youth was conducted using a composite sample of drinkers, ages 17 to 21, from the 1994, 1996, and 1998 Young Adult surveys (n =602). No evidence of confounding of the relationship between drinking frequency and alcohol-related aggression was found. In addition, predisposing characteristics did not modify the association between drinking frequency and alcohol-related aggression. However, family background variables (mother's education and any poverty) were important explanatory variables for alcohol-related aggression among males, whereas recent aggression (fights at school or work) was an important predictor for females. Overall, lack of support for the conditional/interactive and common cause theories of the alcohol and aggression relationship suggests that alcohol has an independent explanatory role in alcohol-related aggression. In addition, the gender differences found in the present study highlight the need for more gender-focussed [sic] research on predictors of alcohol-related aggression, especially among adolescents and young adults. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR; Copyright 2006 Elsevier]
Bibliography Citation
Wells, Samantha L., Kathryn Graham, Mark Speechley and John J. Koval. "Do Predisposing and Family Background Characteristics Modify or Confound the Relationship Between Drinking Frequency and Alcohol-Related Aggression? A Study of Late Adolescent and Young Adult Drinkers." Addictive Behaviors 31,4 (April 2006): 661-675.