Search Results

Source: Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research
Resulting in 7 citations.
1. Andreas, Jasmina Burdzovic
Jackson, Kristina M.
Adolescent Alcohol Use Before and After the High School Transition
Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research 39,6 (June 2015): 1034-1041.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/acer.12730/abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Research Society on Alcoholism and the International Society for Biomedical Research on Alcoholism
Keyword(s): Alcohol Use; Delinquency/Gang Activity; High School

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Results: Alcohol use after HS entry increased at a significantly greater rate than did use during the middle school years, even after accounting for students' age at transition. In addition, early delinquency emerged as a risk factor such that differences in alcohol use existed prior to the transition. That is, children with early delinquency characteristics displayed more rapid progression in alcohol use, but this effect was evident only during middle school.
Bibliography Citation
Andreas, Jasmina Burdzovic and Kristina M. Jackson. "Adolescent Alcohol Use Before and After the High School Transition." Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research 39,6 (June 2015): 1034-1041.
2. Harford, Thomas C.
Parker, Douglas A.
Antisocial Behavior, Family History, and Alcohol Dependence Symptoms
Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research 18,2 (April 1994): 265-268.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1530-0277.1994.tb00012.x/abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Research Society on Alcoholism and the International Society for Biomedical Research on Alcoholism
Keyword(s): Addiction; Alcohol Use; Behavior; Family History; Social Environment; Socioeconomic Factors

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Drawing on data from the National Longitudinal Survey of young adults, this study examines the effects of antisocial behavior on alcohol dependence among young men and women in the United States. An analysis of the data from the study indicates that there are effects of antisocial behavior and that these effects cannot be attributed to a lower social class family of origin or to a positive family history of alcoholism. The analysis also indicates that the strongest effects are found among young adults with both antisocial behavior and a positive family history.
Bibliography Citation
Harford, Thomas C. and Douglas A. Parker. "Antisocial Behavior, Family History, and Alcohol Dependence Symptoms." Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research 18,2 (April 1994): 265-268.
3. Harford, Thomas C.
Parker, Douglas A.
Grant, Bridget F.
Family History, Alcohol Use and Dependence Symptoms Among Young Adults in the United States
Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research 16,6 (December 1992): 1042-1046.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1530-0277.1992.tb00696.x/abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Research Society on Alcoholism and the International Society for Biomedical Research on Alcoholism
Keyword(s): Alcohol Use; Family Background

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Drawing upon data from the National Longitudinal Survey of young adults, this paper examines the effects of family history of alcoholism and current alcohol use by the young adults. A multivariate analysis of the data from the study indicates that there are both main and interaction effects of family history and current alcohol use on dependence symptoms among the young adults.
Bibliography Citation
Harford, Thomas C., Douglas A. Parker and Bridget F. Grant. "Family History, Alcohol Use and Dependence Symptoms Among Young Adults in the United States." Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research 16,6 (December 1992): 1042-1046.
4. Kerr, William C.
Lui, Camillia K.
Williams, Edwina
Ye, Yu
Greenfield, Thomas K.
Lown, E. Anne
Health Risk Factors Associated with Lifetime Abstinence from Alcohol in the 1979 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth Cohort
Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research 41,2 (February 2017): 388-398.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/acer.13302/abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Research Society on Alcoholism and the International Society for Biomedical Research on Alcoholism
Keyword(s): Alcohol Use; Health, Chronic Conditions; Health, Mental; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study used data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 cohort of 14 to 21 year olds followed through 2012 (n = 7,515). Definitions of abstinence and occasional drinking were constructed based on multiple measurements. Descriptive analyses were used to compare the definitions, and in further analysis, lifetime abstainers (n = 718) and lifetime minimal drinkers (n = 1,027) were compared with drinkers across demographics and early-life characteristics (i.e., religion, poverty, parental education, and family alcohol problems) in logistic regression models.
Bibliography Citation
Kerr, William C., Camillia K. Lui, Edwina Williams, Yu Ye, Thomas K. Greenfield and E. Anne Lown. "Health Risk Factors Associated with Lifetime Abstinence from Alcohol in the 1979 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth Cohort." Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research 41,2 (February 2017): 388-398.
5. Veazie, Mark A.
Smith, Gordon S.
Heavy Drinking, Alcohol Dependence, and Injuries at Work among Young Workers in the United States Labor Force
Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research 24,12 (December 2000): 1811-1819.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1530-0277.2000.tb01985.x/abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Research Society on Alcoholism and the International Society for Biomedical Research on Alcoholism
Keyword(s): Alcohol Use; Injuries; Job Hazards; Labor Force Participation

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Background: To determine whether heavily drinking and alcohol-dependent workers are at higher risk of occupational injury, we analyzed the nationally representative cohort of people enrolled in the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth since 1979. Methods: This anlaysis was restricted to the 8569 respondents in the 1989 annual interview (age 24-32) who were employed during the 6 months before the interview. We studied occupational injuries (excluding sprains or strains) reported within 6 months of the interview in 1989 (cross-sectional analysis) and 1990 (prospective analysis). Results: Among current drinkers, significant two-fold increases in the odds of injury for one or more episodes of heavy drinking were reduced to an odds ratio (OR) of 1.2 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.7,2.1) in the cross-sectional analysis and an OR of 1.6 (CI 1.0, 2.8) in the prospective analysis after adjustment for confounding. No dose-response relationship with the frequency of heavy drinking was found. Alcohol-dpendent responsents were not at higher risk of injury in the cross-sectional (OR =1.1, CI 0.7, 1.8) or prospective (OR = 1.3, CI 0.8, 2.2) analysis after adjustment for confounding. Conclusions: For young U.S. workers, common occupational injuries (excluding sprains or strains) may not be strongly associated with alcohol dependence. Confounding by other risk factors may explain much of the association between being a heavy drinker and occupational injuries in the population.
Bibliography Citation
Veazie, Mark A. and Gordon S. Smith. "Heavy Drinking, Alcohol Dependence, and Injuries at Work among Young Workers in the United States Labor Force." Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research 24,12 (December 2000): 1811-1819.
6. Williams, Edwina
Mulia, Nina
Karriker-Jaffe, Katherine J.
Lui, Camillia K.
Changing Racial/Ethnic Disparities in Heavy Drinking Trajectories through Young Adulthood: A Comparative Cohort Study
Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research 42,1 (January 2018): 135-143.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/acer.13541/abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY97
Publisher: Research Society on Alcoholism and the International Society for Biomedical Research on Alcoholism
Keyword(s): Alcohol Use; Ethnic Differences; Racial Differences

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Methods: Data are from the 1979 (n=10,963) and 1997 (n=8,852) cohorts of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth. Generalized estimating equations were used to model trajectories of heavy drinking frequency from ages 17-31. Racial/ethnic differences were determined using sex-stratified models and three-way interactions of race/ethnicity with age, age-squared and cohort.

Results: Racial/ethnic differences in heavy drinking trajectories have changed over time in men and women. In the older NLSY cohort, Hispanic men and Black women surpassed White men's and women's heavy drinking frequency by age 31. This crossover was absent in the younger cohort, where trajectories of all racial-sex groups converged by age 31. Normative trajectories have changed in Hispanics and Whites of both sexes, with a delay in age of peak frequency, and greater levels of heavy drinking in the younger cohort of women.

Conclusion: Changes in heavy drinking trajectories over time suggest the need for targeted interventions during young adulthood. While disparities in young adult heavy drinking were no longer apparent in the more recent birth cohort, continued monitoring is important.

Bibliography Citation
Williams, Edwina, Nina Mulia, Katherine J. Karriker-Jaffe and Camillia K. Lui. "Changing Racial/Ethnic Disparities in Heavy Drinking Trajectories through Young Adulthood: A Comparative Cohort Study." Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research 42,1 (January 2018): 135-143.
7. Windle, Michael T.
Blane, Howard T.
Cognitive Ability and Drinking Behavior in a National Sample of Young Adults
Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research 13,1 (January-February 1989): 43-48.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1530-0277.1989.tb00282.x/abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Research Society on Alcoholism and the International Society for Biomedical Research on Alcoholism
Keyword(s): Alcohol Use; Behavior; Gender Differences; I.Q.

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This research explored the relationship of verbal intelligence to alcohol-related problems using data from the NLSY. It was found that while lower verbal intelligence was associated with a lower risk of drinking, it was also associated, amongst those who drink, with a higher risk for alcohol-related problems.
Bibliography Citation
Windle, Michael T. and Howard T. Blane. "Cognitive Ability and Drinking Behavior in a National Sample of Young Adults." Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research 13,1 (January-February 1989): 43-48.