Search Results

Source: Child Indicators Research
Resulting in 5 citations.
1. Burton, Peter
Phipps, Shelley
Zhang, Lihui
From Parent to Child: Emerging Inequality in Outcomes for Children in Canada and the U.S.
Child Indicators Research 6,2 (June 2013): 363-400.
Also: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s12187-012-9175-1/fulltext.html
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Canadian National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (NLSCY); Child Self-Administered Supplement (CSAS); Children, Poverty; Comparison Group (Reference group); Cross-national Analysis; Educational Aspirations/Expectations; Educational Attainment; Family Income; Income Distribution; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

In this paper, we ask whether there are Canada/U.S. differences in the extent to which children who were rich versus poor during their early years have developed differences in outcomes by the time they reach adolescence or early adulthood. Using comparable longitudinal data for each country, separate analyses are first conducted for rich compared to poor children living in Canada and rich compared to poor children living in the United States. We then pool data sets to test whether any rich/poor child outcome gaps that have emerged are greater (or smaller) in Canada compared to the U.S. Our data source for Canada is the Statistics Canada National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth and for the U.S. we use the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 79, Child-Young Adult supplement. Key findings include: 1) rich child/poor child outcome gaps are evident for all outcomes in both countries; 2) larger gaps between rich and poor children are evident in the U.S. for math scores and high school completion.
Bibliography Citation
Burton, Peter, Shelley Phipps and Lihui Zhang. "From Parent to Child: Emerging Inequality in Outcomes for Children in Canada and the U.S." Child Indicators Research 6,2 (June 2013): 363-400.
2. Hong, Jun Sung
Espelage, Dorothy L.
Kim, Johnny S.
Social-Ecological Antecedents of Oppositional-Defiant Behavior in U.S. Schools: Findings from a Nationally Representative Sample of Early Adolescents
Child Indicators Research 11,1 (February 2018): 307-327.
Also: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s12187-016-9434-7
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Gender Differences; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Neighborhood Effects; Peers/Peer influence/Peer relations; School Performance

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study examines social-ecological antecedents of oppositional-defiant school behavior among early adolescents in the U.S. (ages 12-14; n = 733). Using the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, the sample was drawn from the mother-child dataset, which included youth who, in the first of two years in the study (2002 or 2004), were living with their mothers and were enrolled in school. Participants had to have responded to at least one of the 13 items from a self-administered survey and their mothers had to have responded to at least one of the two items measuring oppositional-defiant school behavior in Time 1 (2002 or 2004; age 10 or 12) and Time 2 (2004 or 2006; age 12 or 14). Male sex, oppositional-defiant school behavior in Time 1, lack of cognitive stimulation, and negative peer influence were associated with oppositional-defiant school behavior in Time 2. The implications for practice from this study are discussed.
Bibliography Citation
Hong, Jun Sung, Dorothy L. Espelage and Johnny S. Kim. "Social-Ecological Antecedents of Oppositional-Defiant Behavior in U.S. Schools: Findings from a Nationally Representative Sample of Early Adolescents." Child Indicators Research 11,1 (February 2018): 307-327.
3. Moore, Kristin Anderson
Ling, Thomson J.
Kinukawa, Akemi
Vandivere, Sharon
Creating a Longitudinal Indicator: an Exploratory Analysis of Turbulence
Child Indicators Research [electronic resource] 2,1 (March 2009): 5-32.
Also: http://www.springerlink.com/content/637030247m6h346v/fulltext.pdf
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Child Care Arrangements; Child Development; Family Structure; Parental Marital Status; Residence; Turbulence; Work Histories

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This exploratory paper conceptualizes, develops, and assesses a potential longitudinal indicator of children's contexts. Three sets of activities are used to create and examine a cumulative, longitudinal measure of turbulence that aggregates children's experiences with different types of change. The initial step involves conceptualizing a construct based on theory and previous research and distinguishing it from related or similar constructs. A second set of activities involves defining and coding a measure of the construct. A third step involves examining predictive or concurrent validity. Turbulence encompasses varied types of change experienced by a developing child, for example, repeated changes in child care arrangements, family structure, income, residence and schooling. Each has been separately linked to poorer outcomes for children. For this exploratory work, retrospective data collected in Round 1 of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, 1997 cohort, were used. A measure was conceptualized and constructed; and the predictive validity of turbulence, over and above background factors, was assessed for a set of adolescent outcomes. Substantively, we conclude that turbulence is an important and measurable construct, but that better data are needed than currently available. The value of the paper is that it illustrates a general approached for conceptualizing, developing, and examining longitudinal, cumulative indicators.
Bibliography Citation
Moore, Kristin Anderson, Thomson J. Ling, Akemi Kinukawa and Sharon Vandivere. "Creating a Longitudinal Indicator: an Exploratory Analysis of Turbulence ." Child Indicators Research [electronic resource] 2,1 (March 2009): 5-32.
4. Shandra, Carrie L.
Hogan, Dennis P.
Delinquency Among Adolescents with Disabilities
Child Indicators Research 5,4 (December 2012): 771-788.
Also: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs12187-012-9135-9
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Arrests; Crime; Delinquency/Gang Activity; Disability; Health, Chronic Conditions; Health, Mental; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study expands upon previous research by utilizing nationally representative data and multivariate analyses to examine the relationship between an adolescent's disability status and their likelihood of engaging in a spectrum of delinquent behaviors through age 16. Logistic regression models of 7,232 adolescents from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 are used to investigate the association between the presence of a learning disability or emotional condition, chronic health condition, sensory condition, physical disability, or multiple conditions and ten delinquent acts, including violence-related delinquency, property crimes, drug offenses, and arrest. Additional analyses explore differences in delinquency prevalence by more specific types of limiting conditions. Results indicate that adolescents with learning disabilities or emotional conditions are particularly at risk of committing delinquent acts. Findings suggest that disability status is important to consider when examining adolescent delinquency; however, not all youth with disabilities have equal experiences.
Bibliography Citation
Shandra, Carrie L. and Dennis P. Hogan. "Delinquency Among Adolescents with Disabilities ." Child Indicators Research 5,4 (December 2012): 771-788.
5. Zhang, Lihui
Violence in Early Life: A Canada-US Comparison
Child Indicators Research 8,2 (June 2015): 299-346. also: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s12187-014-9234-x
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Adolescent Behavior; Behavior, Antisocial; Behavior, Violent; Bullying/Victimization; Canadian National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (NLSCY); Child Self-Administered Supplement (CSAS); Comparison Group (Reference group); Cross-national Analysis; Family Structure; Maternal Employment; Regions

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

In this paper, comparable surveys from 1994 to 2008 are used to show that two geographically and culturally connected nations, Canada and the United States (US), have starkly contrasting violence rates among children and youth and that this cross-country violence gap has emerged among those as young as 2 years old for hitting, 4 years old for bullying, and 12 years old for fighting. Such early life differences remain important as children grow up. The US-Canada violence gaps do not appear to reduce as personal and family characteristics are adjusted for, for example, race, family structure, poverty, and region. Policies in areas most relevant for childhood development, including maternity or parental leave, health care, and child care, are compared across the two countries to identify potential areas where more attention may be paid to improve children’s outcomes.
Bibliography Citation
Zhang, Lihui. "Violence in Early Life: A Canada-US Comparison." Child Indicators Research 8,2 (June 2015): 299-346.