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Source: Victims and Offenders: An International Journal of Evidence-based Research, Policy, and Practice
Resulting in 2 citations.
1. Bouffard, Leana Allen
Koeppel, Maria D.H.
Sex Differences in the Health Risk Behavior Outcomes of Childhood Bullying Victimization
Victims and Offenders: An International Journal of Evidence-based Research, Policy, and Practice 12,4 (2017): 549-565.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/15564886.2015.1118420
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Taylor & Francis Group
Keyword(s): Alcohol Use; Bullying/Victimization; Drug Use; Gender Differences; Sexual Activity; Smoking (see Cigarette Use)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Short- and long-term health consequences of bullying victimization are well documented and include physical and mental health issues as well as increased involvement in risky behavior, but research exploring sex differences in victimization outcomes is still limited. This study uses data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth—1997 to examine the consequences of victimization by sex and, more specifically, relationships between bullying victimization and later health risk behaviors—including risky sexual activity, smoking, alcohol use, and drug use. Multivariate analyses identified sex differences for specific health risk indicators, and a substantial difference was evident for overall risk.
Bibliography Citation
Bouffard, Leana Allen and Maria D.H. Koeppel. "Sex Differences in the Health Risk Behavior Outcomes of Childhood Bullying Victimization." Victims and Offenders: An International Journal of Evidence-based Research, Policy, and Practice 12,4 (2017): 549-565.
2. Lo, Celia C.
Ash-Houchen, William
Gerling, Heather M.
Cheng, Tyrone C.
From Childhood Victim to Adult Criminal: Racial/Ethnic Differences in Patterns of Victimization-Offending among Americans in Early Adulthood
Victims and Offenders: An International Journal of Evidence-based Research, Policy, and Practice published online (17 April 2020): DOI: 10.1080/15564886.2020.1750517.
Also: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/15564886.2020.1750517
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Taylor & Francis Group
Keyword(s): Bullying/Victimization; Crime; Ethnic Differences; Racial Differences

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

A sample of Americans in early adulthood was surveyed to determine (1) whether and how victimization shapes future offending among non-Hispanic Whites, non-Hispanic Blacks, and Hispanics and to examine (2) whether and how a victimization-offending relationship differs by race/ethnicity. Study data came from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 cohort. Violent victimization was indicated by experiencing bullying or by having seen a person suffer a gunshot; each variable was measured once for childhood and once for adolescence. Criminal offending was indicated by arrest(s) occurring after a respondent's immediate past interview with a researcher, covering 2004-2015, and we used a final sample numbering 58,783 person-waves for our study. Needing to consider repeat measures of the same variables over time, we used generalized estimating equations (GEE) in our data analysis. Generally, the results showed that an experience of violent victimization in childhood increased the likelihood of crime commission in early adulthood, across all racial/ethnic groups. Yet for each distinct group, we also observed a distinct pattern(s) in the victimization-offending relationship. Minimizing offending thus will require exploiting what is known (and what is learned in the future) about race/ethnicity's role in victimization.
Bibliography Citation
Lo, Celia C., William Ash-Houchen, Heather M. Gerling and Tyrone C. Cheng. "From Childhood Victim to Adult Criminal: Racial/Ethnic Differences in Patterns of Victimization-Offending among Americans in Early Adulthood." Victims and Offenders: An International Journal of Evidence-based Research, Policy, and Practice published online (17 April 2020): DOI: 10.1080/15564886.2020.1750517.